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Old May 10, 2005, 9:31 AM   #11
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DavidFong wrote:
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What a wonderful and interesting flower, Lovelife! Is this from your own garden, or elsewhere? How long did it bloom? Although not a cactus (I think bromeliads are more like pineapples...), it certainly has a cactus-like look.

Here is a bromeliad from my father's garden, but the macro-shot does not show the full array of floweres that were present on this bromeliad...


Cheerio, David.

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The pineapple belongs to the same plant family but does live off very acid soil. This plant has a very interesting life cycle. It takes 3 to 4 years to reach full maturity. When it approaches the end of its life cycle it throws out this shoot or spike. The spike will stay in color for about 4 weeks and produce tiny florets. The spike then begins to die back and the plant enters the final phase procreation. It sends a tiny shoot from the plant base, which begins a new plant. All of the plant energy is directed to the offspring and the leaves begin to slowly wither over 4-6 months while the baby called a pup takes hold. The pup cannot feed itself until a cup gets large enough to hold water and catch falling plant derbies. This variety of Bromo does not use any nutrients in the soil. When the pup is ready, it sends a signal back to the mother plant, which will decay in a 3-week period. I have done experiments cutting off a new pup and planting it separately. The mother not at full strength will generate another pup because she did not get the signal indicating a successful regeneration. The pup requires 1/3 oz of water and some dead plant leaves in the cup every 2 days. I did it 3 times to one mother plant. I could not believe how the badly decaying mother still had the energy to throw another pup.

Now that is specie survival instinct.
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Old May 10, 2005, 3:55 PM   #12
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LoveLife wrote:
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interesting composition and color... seems a bit noisy, though. was that intentional?
The noise if there, was not intentional. Where do you see the noise on the pink spike? If so, that is not noise it is the surface texture. The pink area is hard with spines, a powdery surface and is not a flower. The flowers are the tiny purple and pink buds. This plant species Bromeliads (BRO-ME'-LE-AD'S) belong to their own plant family with almost 3,000 species and hundreds of hybrids dating back thousands of years. They are indigenous to South America, Central America and the Southern United States. I live in the north east and have this plant indoorsfor 10 years. This is the third genertion and third spike.
could be just the texture of the plant... if so, my apologies.

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Old May 10, 2005, 6:20 PM   #13
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LoveLife wrote:
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DavidFong wrote:
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What a wonderful and interesting flower, Lovelife! Is this from your own garden, or elsewhere? How long did it bloom? Although not a cactus (I think bromeliads are more like pineapples...), it certainly has a cactus-like look.

Here is a bromeliad from my father's garden, but the macro-shot does not show the full array of floweres that were present on this bromeliad...


Cheerio, David.

FZ10 guide --- http://www.users.bigpond.com/vkelim/photography.html
The pineapple belongs to the same plant family but does live off very acid soil. This plant has a very interesting life cycle. It takes 3 to 4 years to reach full maturity. When it approaches the end of its life cycle it throws out this shoot or spike. The spike will stay in color for about 4 weeks and produce tiny florets. The spike then begins to die back and the plant enters the final phase procreation. It sends a tiny shoot from the plant base, which begins a new plant. All of the plant energy is directed to the offspring and the leaves begin to slowly wither over 4-6 months while the baby called a pup takes hold. The pup cannot feed itself until a cup gets large enough to hold water and catch falling plant derbies. This variety of Bromo does not use any nutrients in the soil. When the pup is ready, it sends a signal back to the mother plant, which will decay in a 3-week period. I have done experiments cutting off a new pup and planting it separately. The mother not at full strength will generate another pup because she did not get the signal indicating a successful regeneration. The pup requires 1/3 oz of water and some dead plant leaves in the cup every 2 days. I did it 3 times to one mother plant. I could not believe how the badly decaying mother still had the energy to throw another pup.

Now that is specie survival instinct.
Great shots on these lesser known plants I grow them extensively in my own garden about 6 diff. species some change color in the centre others have a flower spike and some have wonderfull foliage.
Good tip on feeding the pup after early segregation from the parent (did not know that) and yes they do fine indoors they also grow strapped to a tree branch feeeding mostly from debries and the air.
Here is one with nice leaves.

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Old May 10, 2005, 8:42 PM   #14
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wow cool plant thanks for the insight on it , i found it very interesting and a look all its own


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Old May 10, 2005, 9:05 PM   #15
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boyzo wrote:
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Great shots on these lesser known plants I grow them extensively in my own garden about 6 diff. species some change color in the centre others have a flower spike and some have wonderfull foliage.
Good tip on feeding the pup after early segregation from the parent (did not know that) and yes they do fine indoors they also grow strapped to a tree branch feeeding mostly from debries and the air.
Here is one with nice leaves.


Your picture looks like specie that I used to have. Does it get a tall red spike?
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Old May 11, 2005, 10:37 AM   #16
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LoveLife wrote:
[quote]boyzo wrote:
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Great shots on these lesser known plants I grow them extensively in my own garden about 6 diff. species some change color in the centre others have a flower spike and some have wonderfull foliage.
Good tip on feeding the pup after early segregation from the parent (did not know that) and yes they do fine indoors they also grow strapped to a tree branch feeeding mostly from debries and the air.
Here is one with nice leaves.




Your picture looks like specie that I used to have. Does it get a tall red spike?
No flower spike
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Old May 11, 2005, 4:30 PM   #17
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boyzo wrote:
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LoveLife wrote:
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boyzo wrote:
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Great shots on these lesser known plants I grow them extensively in my own garden about 6 diff. species some change color in the centre others have a flower spike and some have wonderfull foliage.
Good tip on feeding the pup after early segregation from the parent (did not know that) and yes they do fine indoors they also grow strapped to a tree branch feeeding mostly from debries and the air.
Here is one with nice leaves.




Your picture looks like specie that I used to have. Does it get a tall red spike?
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No flower spike
This type of plant should get a spike, how old is it? Try this: take a pinch of dried leavesand dried skin from an apple, each piece nobigger then 10 x 10x 1mm. Place it in the cup of the plant and make sure the cup is filled with water. The material will eventually decay giving the plant added nutrition. I feed my plants every 4 months.
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Old May 11, 2005, 4:55 PM   #18
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[/quote]
This type of plant should get a spike, how old is it? Try this: take a pinch of dried leaves and dried skin from an apple, each piece no bigger then 10 x 10 x 1mm. Place it in the cup of the plant and make sure the cup is filled with water. The material will eventually decay giving the plant added nutrition. I feed my plants every 4 months.
[/quote]
I thinkits 5 years old some broms have a flower down inside the Cup or Vase, I water the cup, will try your feed idea with leaves,
Here is a Bromiliad attatched to a tree a narrow leaved species very hardy nice flower.
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