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Old May 29, 2005, 12:27 PM   #1
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Hi everyone

I am currently helping my partner a keen photographer to go digital. I have just purchased an fz20 having wanted the fz10 for years. Now can't wait for delivery.

My partner is a photography students and already gets some work from freinds etc weddings, portraits.

I am looking to buy the perfect printer to accompany the fz20. I already have a lifelong attachment to Epson.

I am considering

r200

r300

r320

1290

r1800

r2400

any others to consider?

Is the fz10 a good enougth camera to produce high quality a3 prints or should I stick to a4 printers. I want to get the best printer possible but want to avoid one that is too good for the camera. I was once told you would need a 8-10 megapixel camera to really produce high quality a3 prints?



Thanks in advance for any opinions you can profer


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Old May 31, 2005, 4:42 AM   #2
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Maybe you will find in the near future detailed information at:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Epson-R2400/






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Old May 31, 2005, 11:58 AM   #3
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I would stick to 8x10 with the FZ20 and use a R300 at home. When you need a an A3 send it out to be processed. Unless you do a lot of A3 the R300 will do a great job and the A3 can be done by an outside source probably with better results,
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Old Jun 1, 2005, 12:18 AM   #4
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I've owned quite a few printers from Epson and a few from Canon. I was also one of the first using the pigment inks and a CIS (continuous ink system). While I'm just an amateur at best (or maybe because of it ??) I've finally 'given up' and now do my color management/photo manipulation at home but send my digital files out for 'regular' print processing. The digital image printing have come a long way in just the last year or so at places like Sam's Club. Sometimes I'll print an image first. Since those home prints are not intended to be the final product, I print them using a speedy Canon printer and good non-OEM inks. Final product matches awfully close to those 'in-house' prints. Fact is, printing 'in house' is more expensive then sending the work out now, all things considered. And no printer headaches !



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Old Jun 1, 2005, 1:34 PM   #5
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I use an Epson Stylus Photo 1280 and am very satisfied with the results. Very true color reproduction. It uses a 6 color ink system. It also incorporates P.I.M. Print Image Matching, a plug-in used in conjunction with Photoshop. I've printed 13 x 19 inch images using a 5 megapixel image and it looks outstanding.
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Old Jun 1, 2005, 4:26 PM   #6
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A lot of folks here seem to like Epson, but I gotta tell you....

For the budget minded, I think the Canon line is superior. I picked up a Pixma IP4000 for $105 including Shipping about 4 months ago. For a sub$100 photo printer with only 3 color inks, I am just routinely STUNNED at the quality of the prints. Sometime a little tweaking is required, but believe me, it's ususally due to the monitor settings, not the Printer. If my monitor is calibrated properly, what you see on the screen is what you get in your hands in 40 seconds for a 4x6 print!
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Old Jun 1, 2005, 7:47 PM   #7
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Lots of good suggestions here. It's a tough call. Since you need a printer, perhaps go with the R200 for "proofs" (smaller prints), and have larger sized prints sent out to be made on pro $200,000 equipment. The R200 is the same as the R300 except you can't print direct from a printer. If you print from your PC, then the R200 might be a better choice.

The Canons - really all the modern photo inkjets, are excellent from a print-quality standpoint. The deciding factor - to me,is the R200 and the R300give you the ability to print directly on (special/coated/easy-to-find) CDs. You might want to considerhaving your logo, and the client's name on a photo-cd. A nice touchall things (photoquality) being about equal.

Really - it's a win, win, win, win - no matter how you go about it. And, you can always change your workflow down the road. It's not etched in stone.

The other thing you didn't mention, is photo permanence. How long will the photos last? For that, the best choice are Epson durabrite pigment-based (not dye-based)ink printers.





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Old Jun 2, 2005, 12:21 AM   #8
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Goldar wrote:
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Lots of good suggestions here. It's a tough call. <snipped>
The other thing you didn't mention, is photo permanence. How long will the photos last? For that, the best choice are Epson durabrite pigment-based (not dye-based)ink printers.

Agreed. One of the reasons I switched to Canon was the ability to refill using third party inks (without buying software or 'chip breakers') and speed even with high res printing (plus the printheads can be changed as easily as changing an ink cartridge.) Lyson now sells inks for them also. The MAIN downside to the Canon is that they are currently dye-based, so pemanence IS quite 'iffy'. With Epson's pigment inks that problem is solved (though they were using a 'hybrid' at one time weren't they?). BUT there are a plethora of other problems/annoyances in setting up/using the Epson printers for professional purposes.

A couple years ago I would havewhole-heartedly agreed that an Epson printer using pigment inks (I used the 'Generations' inks from MediaStreet) was the way to go. Now Ienjoy not worrying about the printing end of it. A lot will depend on how much printing you do, for whom, and for how much money. Plus how 'picky' you are, your time constraints, and how much you worry about such things as fading.

As I said in the earlier post, for me it's better to print using a dye-based Canon and then 'outsource' the 'real' prints. Whichever way you go, please do NOT believe that an inkjetdye-based print will actually look great in 25 years (it won't), OR that an Epson printer will be as simple as 'plug and play' (it won't.)




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