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Old Jun 6, 2005, 3:34 PM   #11
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backyarder1 wrote:
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Just took this one today. The sun is shining brightly right now. Used Aperature mode, set at F8.0 and a tripod. Still looks fuzzy to me. Its either something I am doing wrong or there is something wrong with the camera.
the lighting in this pic looks sufficient, but there's no EXIF info for the pic, so i can't tell what settings you used. but this image is very "busy"... there's a lot of vegetation, and no central focal point. what were you "aiming" at when you snapped the shot? when you have so much detail, especially when there's no clear focal point, the camera may be trying to focus on too many things at once, and is unable to focus on any of them clearly. try selecting the 1-area or spot focus mode, aim at something large enough in the foreground to be suitable, and then while you're holding the shutter down 1/2 way, move the camera to compose the shot (or use manual focus to lock the focus on the foreground). with the camera set at f8 in aperture mode, you should have enough DOF to make the rest of the image clear.


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Old Jun 6, 2005, 6:43 PM   #12
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The first shot seems Ok the contrast is low because of the overcast light, the large leaves of the small shrub are in focus bark can be seen peeling of the gum tree.
The second shot has more sun but is busy with lots of detail an no apparent plane of focus.

Busy garden scenes are not the best for checking camera focus accuracy.

I would try shooting something geometric ie the side of a house, A 1 plain subject, set the camera on a tripod plumb and true turn the OIS (optical image stabiliser) OFF
Set distance to enable detail not too close not too far
Pick a well lit day aperture set to f5.6 and iso set to the lowest (50) use the self timer to avoid shake. make sure the focus lock signal occurs with the half press on the shutter.
The house picture should have well defined edges and show texture as well if the camera is OK.

With landscapes focus at point 1/3 into the scene this gives best overall depth of field .... this is an approximation of the Hyperfocal distance point often used on SLRs but applies to digi cams also.
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Old Jun 7, 2005, 1:57 AM   #13
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backyarder1 wrote:
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It's very sunny out today, when I took the second photo. But if you are taking a shady garden, which I was in the first shot, you'll never get good overhead sun. I'm wondering if the lens of my camera doesn't have something wrong with it. Since its not an SLR camera, I can't look through it and see if it is clear. I need to take it to a camera store or something and see if they can look through it.
You are wasting people's time by not supplying the Exif information.
Aperture: f/??
ISO: ??
Focal Length: Ex. 54.5mm (328mm 35mm)
Exposure Time: Ex. 0.02s (10/500)

Then we can help.

Picture II: Mad dogs mad Englishmen go out in the midday sun, not photographers looking for DOF.

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Old Jun 7, 2005, 9:33 AM   #14
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I think the 9 spot focusing mode might be part of the problem. The subject is full of detail at multiple depths and the cam era might be having a hard time deciding where to focus. Why don't you try some exposures in spot mode or one area (like squirl already suggested).

While you are at it I think you should use the exposure bracketing feature. Try something like a 5.6 setting in A mode with a +/- 1 bracket value. REview the three exposures and you will get a better idea of the best setting for your given conditions.
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Old Jun 7, 2005, 10:56 AM   #15
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Hi; You can do a lot of corrections in P&P if you have any photo editing software such as Photoshop.
I did a quick adujust auto levels plus unsharp and it made it clearer I think...see what you think (I also made it smaller to view here....)

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Old Jun 7, 2005, 11:18 AM   #16
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I agree with the previous comments. I think that using 9-point focusing might be part of your problem. I almost always use spot or 1-point focus. That way, you can press the shutter half way and focus on what you want to, and then recompose the shot and trip the shutter. Using the smallest possible aperture (largest f-stop number) will also help to increase your depth of field.
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Old Jun 7, 2005, 2:28 PM   #17
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I appreciate everyone's help. One thing I can say is that if some of you think that the top photo is clear enough, than maybe I am trying too hard. After all, I'm a writer, not a photographer. A lot of places don't pay any extra for photos so they aren't going to get Ansel Adams.

I got every digital photography book out of the library I can find so maybe I will figure it out. If I do, I'll let you all know.

You can see by this photo that I don't do too bad with other things. Its just the landscapes that I am having a hard time with.


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Old Jun 7, 2005, 5:01 PM   #18
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backyarder1 wrote:
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I appreciate everyone's help. One thing I can say is that if some of you think that the top photo is clear enough, than maybe I am trying too hard. After all, I'm a writer, not a photographer. A lot of places don't pay any extra for photos so they aren't going to get Ansel Adams.

I got every digital photography book out of the library I can find so maybe I will figure it out. If I do, I'll let you all know.

You can see by this photo that I don't do too bad with other things. Its just the landscapes that I am having a hard time with.

Doesn't seem all that much better to me. Have you tried the suggestions above?

The 'masters' on this list could have (may have!) written some of the books you borrowed. EXIF info would help. Kinda like going to a doctor and telling him 'I hurt all over'. Without more info, how can he help? So instead, you go to the library and get a lot of medical books.... sigh.

(not trying to be fascicious)
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Old Jun 7, 2005, 5:02 PM   #19
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Well, have you tried using the USM filter? (Unsharp Mask) To me the pictures that you took have enough detail to be enhanced by a sharpening technique in post processing.
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Old Jun 7, 2005, 5:04 PM   #20
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Yeap, but as everybody else said, use a tripod, use Aperture Priority (F8.0) for better Depth of Field. and turn off the Image stabilization. That shoulld do it.
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