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Old Jun 7, 2005, 5:29 PM   #21
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I apologize for being such a newbie. I didn't even know what EXIF was until I looked it up. Next time, I'll figure out how to include that information. I will also turn off stabilization since several people suggestion that, but it doesn't make sense to me that that would help.

And I imagine the books I checked out will help mefigure outsome of the post processing techniques.
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Old Jun 7, 2005, 5:48 PM   #22
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backyarder1 wrote:
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I apologize for being such a newbie. I didn't even know what EXIF was until I looked it up. Next time, I'll figure out how to include that information. I will also turn off stabilization since several people suggestion that, but it doesn't make sense to me that that would help.

And I imagine the books I checked out will help me figure out some of the post processing techniques.
No need to apologize for heaven's sake! Ask via private mail if not publicly. Also, chances are a quick 'search' in the forum will pull up some old posts that explain the unfamiliar to you.
[edit] I just now did such a search using "EXIF information". Try it, you'll like it !!

You'll find the members on this list VERY helpful most of the time. If you haven't already, you may want to check out the owners manual posted on this forum. There is a LOT more information here than you'll find in the one that comes with your camera. The models may be different but the controls generally are the same.
Don't mean to denigrate getting books either. But you might also check out online sites mentioned in some prior posts for photography tips. Be aware that you can EASILY get 'drowned' in information. Best place to start IMHO are the 'sticky' posts of this Panasonic forum. They also point to other online sources of great information.

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Old Jun 7, 2005, 5:52 PM   #23
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Thanks. I agree. Forums are generally the best place to learn things. I'll take your advice and check out the manual , etc.

Now if I could just find a forum to answer my dhtml questions!
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Old Jun 7, 2005, 7:35 PM   #24
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I think some people were a bit harsh in the way they gave you advise.
I am a relative newbie too and it can be a bit intimidating sometimes here .....(My general view tends to be that if a photo looks good never mind how it was taken...techique is fine but it does not make art unless one has vision? There are many beautiful pictures here and elsehwere taken on just a P setting!)
but I think everyone means well so don't take criticism to heart!
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Old Jun 7, 2005, 7:44 PM   #25
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Thanks. I didn't take anything as too harsh. Everybody on this forum is great.
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Old Jun 11, 2005, 12:04 AM   #26
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Backyarder,

It is the nature of digital photos to look a little soft. I have been looking into this matter and find that the experts invariably recommend the use of the unsharp mask on ALL digital photos.

I copied your first photo into PSP9 and used USM, 0.6 radius 200 strength and 5% clipping to the whole image. The resultant image appeared critically sharp at 100% magnification.

Regards, J.Rosier
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Old Jun 11, 2005, 8:23 AM   #27
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RE: usharp mask.

That's what I mean about being a newbie. One of the books I got at the library said this: "Digital camera images are deliberately soft to avoid this problem (moire) and to enable the user to assign sharpness at a later stage."

In other words, NO digital pictures come out of the camera at optimal sharpness and you MUST use usharp mask to correct. It's too bad I didn't realize that before. I've had a lot of pictures published since I started going digital that could have been a lot clearer.


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Old Jun 11, 2005, 7:26 PM   #28
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You can adjust the initial sharpness by going into the camera menu, scrool to "PICT.ADJ." and then "Sharpness". Here you are presented three options: High Std. and Low - High is similar to Unsharp mask in effect. Try it out and you may decide to use that setting if you like the results better.
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Old Jun 12, 2005, 1:39 AM   #29
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Backyarder1 there is a definate problem in regard to sharpness in the photos you have posted here.

Personally I use spot metering and spot focusing all the time on my FZ20 and has worked well for me. I use Program Shift a lot to gain DOF needed. Please look at my gallery to confirm what I say is workable. A wide lens is valuable for landscapes/scenics.

http://northland.smugmug.com Cheers. Bob
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Old Jun 12, 2005, 12:11 PM   #30
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Your photos are beautiful. I think the camera I have, the FZ3, doesn't have a lot of the same options as the more expensive FZ's. I appreciate your comments and advice. I think I am getting a little better.
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