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Old Jun 6, 2005, 10:44 AM   #1
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I am a freelance writer and I write a lot of garden articles. I NEED to be able to get good landscape shots, but I just can't seem to do it. Ihave a Lumix FZ-3 and I can get good closeups, but my distant, landscape shots all look fuzzy. Does anyone have any suggestions? I usually shoot in program mode.
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Old Jun 6, 2005, 11:43 AM   #2
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Backyarder, picture is a bit on the large size, even on my windscreen notebook. For others you may like to drop the size down a bit. The shot has no EXIF information, can you post then we can see what setup you had - also say if you had any other lenses etc.

At a quick glance it's not that bad (i.e. it's quite good). Are you looking on a monitor or a print?

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Old Jun 6, 2005, 11:52 AM   #3
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Sorry. I was trying to keep it big so that you could see the detail and see what I mean about it being fuzzy. I am looking at it on my monitor, but I can look at the picture of the bee posted on this forum and it is crystal clear. None of my pictures are. Here is the data for the picture, taken at program mode: 1/320 sec. ISO 80 F.4. No special lens.
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Old Jun 6, 2005, 12:06 PM   #4
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the pic you posted was obviously taken in poor light... overcast day, no shadows for depth, and probably a relatively slow shutter and/or wide open aperture. Try shooting in aperture mode, stop the lens down to f5.6 or higher (f8 is best), to get better clarity inthe backgrounds in your shots. if you need to, don't be afraid to use a tripod to compensate for slow shutter speeds (OIS can do a lot, but it's not perfect). if possible, pick sunny days, or at least brighter ones than the one you posted, to take your landscapes; the sunlight will add shadows and depth to the image, and will also let you use faster shutter speeds with the higher f-stops. i think you'll see a difference...


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Old Jun 6, 2005, 12:10 PM   #5
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Thanks. We are on our sixth straight day of rain here. I did run out during a sunny part of the day, but it probably wasn't bright, bright sun. Also, I keep my camera on Auto for white balance. Do you think that is the best choice?
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Old Jun 6, 2005, 1:29 PM   #6
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Just took this one today. The sun is shining brightly right now. Used Aperature mode, set at F8.0 and a tripod. Still looks fuzzy to me. Its either something I am doing wrong or there is something wrong with the camera.
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Old Jun 6, 2005, 1:52 PM   #7
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What focus and light metering did you use and did you resample the pic when you changed it to 300 dpi?
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Old Jun 6, 2005, 2:46 PM   #8
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multiple metering mode and 9 area focusing. And yes, I did resample. Or the software did, actually. I didn't purposelly set it that way.
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Old Jun 6, 2005, 3:14 PM   #9
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Ideally to achieve decent depth of field you need more light. Wait for a sunny day and set the camera to aperture priority. That should give you a smaller f-stop and enough shutter speed to keep the image steady. If you must shoot in poor light, you can set your ISO higher to increase light sensitivity. The trade off is more noise in larger images.
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Old Jun 6, 2005, 3:18 PM   #10
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It's very sunny out today, when I took the second photo. But if you are taking a shady garden, which I was in the first shot, you'll never get good overhead sun. I'm wondering if the lens of my camera doesn't have something wrong with it. Since its not an SLR camera, I can't look through it and see if it is clear. I need to take it to a camera store or something and see if they can look through it.
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