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Old Jun 28, 2005, 3:44 AM   #1
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These are from the first roll of hand processed black and whites I've ever done. Gotta tell you. While it's great to see your shots immediately with a digicam, it is also WAY fun to pull those negatives out of the tank and see them developed from scratch. I fully expected this NOT to work the first time. Definately an "It's Alive!!!" moment, to quote Victor Frankenstein.

The film is medium format, 400 ISO Ilford HP Plus.
Took this with a Kiev 60 medium format SLR...
The lens (talk about a luscious lens...) is a 180mm, Zeiss Jena Sonnar. It's a renouned portrait lens, notice the beautiful (imo) painting-like "bokeh" (out of focus areas).The lens is also gigantic! Must weigh a couple pounds. These were hand-held using a fast shutter speed... Or "old school" image stabilization. :G

These were developed in D76 1:1.
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Old Jun 28, 2005, 3:45 AM   #2
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Old Jun 28, 2005, 3:48 AM   #3
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The negative were scanned with an Epson 3170 flatbed scanner. It has a special insert that scans slides and 35mm and medium format negatives. This is the second higest optical resolution setting, about 10 megapixels. The highest resolution is about 20 megapixels but I never use it. File size is cumbersome to work with in PS, plus I don't need that resolution for prints... but it's there if I want it.

Here's a crop of the above picture...
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Old Jun 28, 2005, 3:49 AM   #4
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Old Jun 28, 2005, 3:53 AM   #5
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Last one. As anyone who has done this knows, it's a little more work to get the image, but I consider it fun. A lot of photographic fun.

Film cameras cost less than the digitals, and image quality is higher. Since you already have the "digital experience", for another flavor of photographic fun, you might want to consider black and white film development, and do the printing with digital in post.

I was going to get a DSLR, but ended up getting this Kiev 60 system and a few lenses to do (mostly) black and white for a different "experience". So glad I did...
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Old Jun 28, 2005, 4:25 AM   #6
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beautiful results Nick,
a very pleasing experience to hold the result of your efforts
in your hands at the end of the process.


Gazza
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Old Jun 28, 2005, 7:07 AM   #7
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Beautiful work Nick! Thanks for posting.
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Old Jun 28, 2005, 8:08 AM   #8
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No matter what technology (film vs. digital) you use... the most important is to have a photographic eye (subject, composition, exposure, etc...). Congratulations Nick, probably the best shots I've seen in this forum...

And I agree with you, film will be ever film (I recently began digital with my FZ20 but nothing compares with the Leica shots that I'm capable to capture with the cameras I herited from my grandfather...)

Please post more frequently, we still have a lot to learn !
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Old Jun 28, 2005, 8:29 AM   #9
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Nick,

Congrats man. I know how you feel. There is nothing like doing it by hand. I did a lot of rolls in high school but never got all the tools to develop the film at home. Still would like to, but I just don't have the time now. Some day?!?!

If you already have your darkroom setup with an enlarger and trays then you may also want to experiment with making B&W prints from color negatives. I've done a fair number of them and they turn out real nice. You don't get the full impact and artistic grain of the good B&W films but it's still nice to convert a few. Give it a try I think you'll like the results.

Keep up the good work!!

-Brett
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Old Jun 28, 2005, 9:12 AM   #10
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Hi Nick,

I have been lurking on this forum for the last many months and if I remember correctly, this is one of the rare times that you have posted PICTURES. I have seen you offering advice, cutting jokes, pulling legs, encouraging the disheartened, mediating between prizefighters on the forum, but hardly ever posting pictures.

This B&W series must have been something very special ( evidently it is, judging by the subject)to you to make you post . They are all beautiful, pictures and subjects.

Happy Developing!


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