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Old Jul 16, 2005, 3:43 PM   #1
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According to the manual, OIS should be set to OFF when tripod is used. Why is that? Does OIS degrade the image quality?

Also the manual said that OIS mode2 offers a greater degree of stabilization. Does this mean mode2 is better than mode1?

Do mode1 and mode2 work better in different situations? In which situations should I use mode1 and in which situations should I use mode2?

Thank you.





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Old Jul 16, 2005, 4:59 PM   #2
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From what I understand (correct me if I'm wrong), when you're on a tripod, you don't need the stabilization, since the camera is mounted. I'm assuming they suggest to turn OIS off just to conserve power, since the gyroscopes won't be activated.

OIS Mode 1 stabilizes the lens pre, during and post shutter. So it's always stabilized. OIS Mode 2 only stabilizes the lens upon shutter, so it should produce slightly sharper images in some instances. I usually use Mode 2 shooting almost everything, I only use Mode 1 if I'm in max telephoto, and the subject is hard to capture. The stabilization for pre-shutter is useful so I can track things more accurately.
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Old Jul 17, 2005, 4:05 AM   #3
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skyrocketfw wrote:
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According to the manual, OIS should be set to OFF when tripod is used. Why is that? Does OIS degrade the image quality?

Also the manual said that OIS mode2 offers a greater degree of stabilization. Does this mean mode2 is better than mode1?

Do mode1 and mode2 work better in different situations? In which situations should I use mode1 and in which situations should I use mode2?

Thank you.




The one thing that messes up OIS is no movement. It is designed to have two different images and create an adjusted picture. The theory being that there is always some movement. It tries to overcompensate when the camera is motionless which can shave off a bit of detail.
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Old Jul 17, 2005, 3:08 PM   #4
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LoveLife wrote:
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The one thing that messes up OIS is no movement. It is designed to have two different images and create an adjusted picture. The theory being that there is always some movement. It tries to overcompensate when the camera is motionless which can shave off a bit of detail.
I understand the Lumix system to work by using gyros to sense movement & then the error signal moving a lens element. The optical image is not used to sense movement. I believe that Minolta uses a motion sensing system based on the image on the CCD. That's how they can get OIS in the camera body, independent of the lens. I would love to see a working model of the OIS system. My Canon IS binoculars use a similar system to stabilize the image & I can hear a faint whining sound when motion is present. I don't know if that is the gyros working or the lens being moved. Cheers

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