Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Panasonic / Leica

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Sep 15, 2005, 8:22 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 8
Default

Having only had my FZ20 for a month or so now and as I am a complete newbee I am
still taking practice shots

We live near the sea and I would like to take some shots there but am a little concerned regarding saltwater seaspray. What are the safeguards against this and what should one do after being exposed to this possible damage. How much metal does the FZ 20 have in it's casing and what about the lens, how to clean it afterwards?

Am I being paranoid :?

Wallaby is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Sep 15, 2005, 11:48 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
squirl033's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 6,720
Default

most of the FZ's body is polycarbonate plastic, very little metal except the switch contacts and perhaps the knobs and other little fiddly-bits. the main thing you'd have to worry about is salt mist getting into the controls or in through the lens barrel. but as long as you avoid exposing the camera to actual mist or spray, you should be fine. i spent a weekend at the coast with mine a few weeks ago, and it actually got fairly damp on the outside from the fog, but i wiped it dry and it's fine. i do strongly advise you to get an adapter so you can mounta skylight or UV filter close to the lens. this will not only protect the lens from physical damage (i.e. impact), but it will help keep debris or contaminants from getting into the works as the lens moves in and out within the barrel. the filter can be wiped clean with a lint-free soft cloth.
squirl033 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 17, 2005, 1:13 AM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 8
Default

Thanks Squirl033 for your answer. I think the adapter you mention already comes with the camera to attach the lens hood, is this what you mean? Also in the manual it says there's an MC protector or ND filter available, by UV filter do you mean the ND filter?

:?
Wallaby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 17, 2005, 11:31 AM   #4
Member
 
tswill2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 94
Default

Not paranoid a bit - salt spray can do a job on your gear. I would recomend a full camera cover, the small camera RainCoat for about $23 from FotoSharp.com in Seattle (where it rains most of the time) to protect the body, and a UV filter to protect the lens. If exposed to saltspray without safeguards, you should dry the camera completly, and take it to a service center for internal examination and cleaning if required. It (salt) can eat the solder off the camera circuits! Avoid cleaning the lens if possible, the coatings are easy to damage.

Even with the raincoat and UV, I would minimize the time my camera is out in it. A full dive bag would be better, but could cost in the $200 range, or more! The UV is a standard UltraViolet filter which is almost like windowglass in clarity. It blocks most UV light and 'slightly' warms the photos. A ND filter is neutral density, which darkens the pictures if shooting manual, or forces the autoexposure to wider f stops and or a slower shutter speed. These adjustments are desired for some artistic effects. Tom

" We live near the sea and I would like to take some shots there but am a little concerned regarding saltwater seaspray. What are the safeguards against this and what should one do after being exposed to this possible damage. How much metal does the FZ 20 have in it's casing and what about the lens, how to clean it afterwards?
Am I being paranoid :? "


tswill2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 17, 2005, 8:43 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
squirl033's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 6,720
Default

tswill2 is right, salt moisture can corrode the electrical circuits inside your camera, if it gets in there.it will eventually damage the solder and any aluminum parts inside. first thing that would be affected, though, would be your battery and memory card contacts, and the switches. they are much more vulnerable. but if it's just mist or fog, there's little need for full covers, etc. unlessyou're worried about actually getting salt water splashed on the camera, in which caseyes, you'll need the whole thing covered.

the factory adapter is not what i had in mind. i was thinking of one of the aftermarket types, like the Phayee or Pemaraal, that screw onto the lens barrel. they have threads for a 62mm filter on the front, and will position the UV or skylight filter right next to the lens when it's fully extended. if you're concerned about the camera in even light mist, but don't want the expense of a dive bag or other cover, you can probably protect most of the critical parts by simply wrapping the thing with Saran Wrap or the like. it's clear, so you can see the controls and the LCD (possibly even the EVF), and it's flexible enough to conform to the camera shape. it'll keep all but a serious splash of water out of the works, and you can easily remove it and toss it when you're done. only problem is, if you want to use the flash, you'd need to wrap that separately...

tswill2 - i live in the Seattle area (it doesn't REALLY rain all the time, but we like to keep the rest of the country thinking that... we've got too damned many people here already!), and i've yet to have even the slightest moisture problem with my FZ.


squirl033 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 17, 2005, 10:04 PM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 8
Default

Thank you both for your advice and information. I don't plan on getting all that close to the spray in fact would probably stay well clear.We do hear of people who live near the sea having problems with all their electrical equipment eventually because the salt is in the air all the time. I will check out prices here in Australia to see what I can get to protect the lens however as I am not sure if the brands you mention will be easily available here.

Love seeing everyones photos, it's a very helpful forum.
Wallaby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 18, 2005, 9:41 AM   #7
Member
 
tswill2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 94
Default

I lived near Vero Beach, FL for some time, and about 4 miles inland from the ocean. On a damp night you could hear the powerline insulators singing due to the arcing over the dampened salt! This at 50' in the air. It's a matter of time/distance. The longer the time and the closer the distance, the more salt will get on and into your equipment. A good onshore wind multiplies the equation. Seattle must be a good area with the prevailing wind from the west. The Saran wrap idea is worth remembering. The population problem is getting worldwide. Tom

"tswill2 - i live in the Seattle area (it doesn't REALLY rain all the time, but we like to keep the rest of the country thinking that... we've got too damned many people here already!), and i've yet to have even the slightest moisture problem with my FZ. "
tswill2 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:24 AM.