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Old Oct 23, 2005, 9:22 PM   #1
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What's the difference between a UV(n) filter and a UV(0) filter?

Thanks in advance!

Amir
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Old Oct 23, 2005, 10:20 PM   #2
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i don't think there really is much. UV light is basically divided into two types, UV(a) and UV(a), depending on wavelength. sometimes, in photos taken above 5-7,000 feet (approximately 1600-2300m), UV filters will actually reduce the bluish effect of extreme distance, but in lower elevations, the filter doesn't seem to do muchm mainly because the atmosphere itself filters out so much of the UV radiation from the sun. in any case, since digital cameras are far less sensitive to UV light than film, the main reason to keep a UV or skylight filter on your lens is to protect it from scratches, smudges, or other damage. it's just cheap insurance. for that, it doesn'y really matter which kind of UV filter you use.
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Old Oct 24, 2005, 6:57 AM   #3
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Squirl to the rescue! (again)

Many Thanks!

Amir
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Old Oct 24, 2005, 10:28 AM   #4
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Amiroquai wrote:
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What's the difference between a UV(n) filter and a UV(0) filter?

Thanks in advance!

Amir
I spoke to Hoya about these (N) filters two months ago. They told me that UV (N) is a lesser quality filter that was developed for the Asian market and the factory warrantee will not cover (N) filters sold in the US. They are aware of what is going on with eBay and are trying to cut off supplies to the unscrupulous people that are doing this.
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Old Oct 24, 2005, 11:41 AM   #5
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LoveLife wrote:
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Amiroquai wrote:
Quote:
What's the difference between a UV(n) filter and a UV(0) filter?

Thanks in advance!

Amir
I spoke to Hoya about these (N) filters two months ago. They told me that UV (N) is a lesser quality filter that was developed for the Asian market and the factory warrantee will not cover (N) filters sold in the US. They are aware of what is going on with eBay and are trying to cut off supplies to the unscrupulous people that are doing this.
That's good to know, I was wondering why I hadn't seen those Hoya filter packages before...I'll stay away form those. thanks!
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Old Oct 25, 2005, 5:59 PM   #6
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UV filters, do also significative effect at sea, or in land (very) near sea (beach ones) ... I think is a more interesting info for majority of users that high altitude, where other type of UV filters are more recommended...just my 2 cents
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Old Oct 25, 2005, 6:07 PM   #7
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jcr wrote:
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UV filters, do also significative effect at sea, or in land (very) near sea (beach ones) ... I think is a more interesting info for majority of users that high altitude, where other type of UV filters are more recommended...just my 2 cents
Unless there is a high concentration of UV which occurs at 3000 feet and above or in High humidity days at the beach the UVif it cost $12.00 or $60.00 is transparent. Now we have 4 cents. I get better results with a linear polarizer at the beach.
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Old Oct 25, 2005, 6:46 PM   #8
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LoveLife wrote:
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Unless there is a high concentration of UV which occurs at 3000 feet and above or in High humidity days at the beach the UVif it cost $12.00 or $60.00 is transparent. Now we have 4 cents. I get better results with a linear polarizer at the beach.
high humidity days at beach are common at this side of ocean...

$12 it's not transparent in front of a Leica Lens to me, never forget that the worst item, defines the quality of the full assembly, I would not put a cheap (read less quality) lensin front of these Leica ones...

I agree that a polarizer gives a morepleasant photo in beach, but that was not what I was trying to clarify...
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Old Oct 25, 2005, 8:05 PM   #9
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jcr wrote:
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LoveLife wrote:
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Unless there is a high concentration of UV which occurs at 3000 feet and above or in High humidity days at the beach the UVif it cost $12.00 or $60.00 is transparent. Now we have 4 cents. I get better results with a linear polarizer at the beach.
high humidity days at beach are common at this side of ocean...

$12 it's not transparent in front of a Leica Lens to me, never forget that the worst item, defines the quality of the full assembly, I would not put a cheap (read less quality) lensin front of these Leica ones...

I agree that a polarizer gives a morepleasant photo in beach, but that was not what I was trying to clarify...
You are associating $12.00 cheap with being inferior. Hoya is the only company to make a dual coated UV. The light transmission difference between it and the most expensive multi-coated UV you can buy is ¼ of an F-stop. If you think you can see that your ego is tugging at your purse strings. I have been taking pictures for over 57 years and have heard that phrase inordinate amount of times. " I am not going to put that cheap filter in front of my high quality lens". The optical quality of this filter is the same as their top of the line it is a matter of coatings. Hoya does make an uncoated UV in a green case andI would never put that filter in front of my worst lens.
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Old Oct 26, 2005, 7:37 PM   #10
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LoveLife wrote:
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You are associating $12.00 cheap with being inferior. Hoya is the only company to make a dual coated UV. The light transmission difference between it and the most expensive multi-coated UV you can buy is ¼ of an F-stop. If you think you can see that your ego is tugging at your purse strings. I have been taking pictures for over 57 years and have heard that phrase inordinate amount of times. " I am not going to put that cheap filter in front of my high quality lens". The optical quality of this filter is the same as their top of the line it is a matter of coatings. Hoya does make an uncoated UV in a green case andI would never put that filter in front of my worst lens.


[align=justify]We are both satisfied with results from our filters...That's good... I personaly prefer the MRC (Multi Resistant Coating). In some premium brands (b&W, Rodenstock, Heliopan) it's a
enhanced process that assures virtually complete elimination of surface reflections on both sides of each filter and thus leads to a maximization of light transmission. In addition, its extraordinary hardness minimizes scratching and its water- and dirt repelling surfaces facilitate the care of filters, Iam completelly shure of it, I already testes both cheap and more expensive (I currently have those three mencioned brands). Of course there are other less quality brands that use same nomenclature, with no such quality and no benefits at all, I personaly prefer a single coated B&W than a cheap MC one.[/align]
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