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Old Nov 23, 2005, 10:32 PM   #1
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It seems a good value (results & cost) for macro work would be to get a Nikon 5T (1.5 dioptre 62 mm). But how should I attach it?

Also, any thoughts on the Raynox DCR-250 with a RT5264P adapter on the FZ20 instead?

Thanks!
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Old Nov 23, 2005, 11:39 PM   #2
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best way to attach the Nikon macro lenses is to get an adapter such as the ones made by Phayee, Pemaraal or Raynox. i have the Phayee adapter, cost me $22.50 plus $4.50 shipping on ebay. it screws onto the FZ20 where the trim ring normally goes, and has 62mm threads on the front to accept filters, hoods, or add-on lenses like the Nikon 5T/6T or a teleconverter. i have a UV filter which i leave attached to the adapter at all times, to protect the lens, and i can screw my Nikon 6T onto that for razor sharp macros.

the Phayee adapter positions filterswithin about 1/8" of the front of the lens when it's fully extended, which minimizes the distance between filter and lens, and cuts down on reflections and flaring. i can't say anything about the Pemaraal or Raynox adapters, except that they perform a similar function. i think the Raynox uses a different thread size in front, though.
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Old Nov 24, 2005, 12:37 AM   #3
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controltheweb wrote:
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It seems a good value (results & cost) for macro work would be to get a Nikon 5T (1.5 dioptre 62 mm). But how should I attach it?

Also, any thoughts on the Raynox DCR-250 with a RT5264P adapter on the FZ20 instead?

Thanks!

I have both, the Nikon 4T (same as 5T, but 52MM instead of 62MM) attached the Raynox adapter, and the DCR-250. I have not used them a lot, but it seems to me that the DCR-250has a very close and limited focusrange and extremely small DOF. Makes it very difficult to shoot in "off-the-cuff" situations, the 4T or 5T work better, but you can't get quite as close. The DCR is great if you have a fixed stand and you can take the time to adjust the exact focus distance and get super macro shots in a stationary setup. Raynox has such a stand, which I am considering getting.
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Old Nov 24, 2005, 1:40 AM   #4
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controltheweb wrote:
Quote:
It seems a good value (results & cost) for macro work would be to get a Nikon 5T (1.5 dioptre 62 mm). But how should I attach it?

Also, any thoughts on the Raynox DCR-250 with a RT5264P adapter on the FZ20 instead?

Thanks!
I suggest if you want the Nikon product to purchase either the 4T or 6T. They are stronger then the 3t or 5T.The 4T and 6T 2.9 diopter can be used at less magnification my reducing the zoom. Here is an example of a Nikon 4T on a CRing adapter with a 62-52mm CRing at full zoom.



Here is a shot with the zoom backed off.



The Phayee adapter is a good system if you only use 62mm accessories. It utilizes normal step rings for other size mounts. The Raynox adapter has a 52mm front mount and there have been vignetting problems reported with a filter and lens hood in place. The 62mm CRing adapter positions every accessory no matter what the mount 3mm .1181 inches or less then 1/8" from the front bezel of the FZ20. It has special flush mount CRings that can convert the adapter to 55mm 52mm and soon 58 and 43mm. There is no displacement increase associated with step rings. The 43mm CRing for the DCR250 will eliminate the 6mm gap caused by the spring mount system supplied by Raynox. They expect this configuration to produce better results. The DCR250 with the 43mm CRing will mount 3mm from the front bezel just like any other accessory.

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Old Nov 24, 2005, 11:01 AM   #5
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Thanks for the great tips!

Getting very close is one priority (for me). Flexible distance from subject is another (not scare subject; ease of focussing; not block flash). Also, as I understand it, closest to the lens = least possible reflections/other problems, so the CRing looks good.

Also, what problems would I run into with generic lenses, such as shown at:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...;translate=yes

The price by comparison is of course ridiculously cheap.


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Old Nov 24, 2005, 12:52 PM   #6
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controltheweb wrote:
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Thanks for the great tips!

Getting very close is one priority (for me). Flexible distance from subject is another (not scare subject; ease of focussing; not block flash). Also, as I understand it, closest to the lens = least possible reflections/other problems, so the CRing looks good.

Also, what problems would I run into with generic lenses, such as shown at:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...;translate=yes

The price by comparison is of course ridiculously cheap.


These are known as close-up filter sets you can have mine for the postage. Hoya and some other well know companies make them. They may work on 50mm fixed lenses but not on the FZ zoom. All these close-up filters are single element uncoated magnifying glass and are not worth xxx cents. Yes they do magnify but the image if made larger then a 3" x 3" is very poor. The Nikon and the Raynox are two element coated optical glass. This picture is a 30 % crop of the originaland is still tack sharp. This little fellow is 7/16" leg to leg. BTW, you must have good light and patience.









Aperture:
f/5.2
ISO: [/b]
100
Focal Length: [/b]
56.1mm (337mm 35mm)
Exposure Time: [/b]
0.004s (10/2500)[/b]

This shot was not done at full zoom taking this approach can give you a bit more DOF. Did I mention very good light?



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Old Nov 25, 2005, 4:12 AM   #7
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photo-xpress (ebay) is selling an adapter that looks exactly like the pemaraal (same distance from lens), but slightly longer than the Phayee. Includes a cap and a hood, and selling from U.S. for $15. Seems like a bargain.

Any comments, user experiences with this adapter? (Not as nice as the Cring, though, I think.) Here are the adapters (including shipping cost to me in the Midwest) I'm considering:

$37.50 cring U.S. -- top quality
$35.85 pemaraal U.S.
$29.50 PHAYEE China
$18.98 PhotoExpress ebay U.S. -- lowest cost
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Old Nov 25, 2005, 1:56 PM   #8
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controltheweb wrote:
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photo-xpress (ebay) is selling an adapter that looks exactly like the pemaraal, but slightly longer than the Phayee. Includes a cap and a hood, and selling from U.S. for $15. Seems like a bargain.

Any comments, user experiences with this adapter? (Not as nice as the Cring, though, I think.) Here are the adapters (including shipping cost to me in the Midwest) I'm considering:

$37.50 cring U.S. -- top quality
$35.85 pemaraal U.S.
$29.50 PHAYEE China
$18.98 PhotoExpress ebay U.S. -- lowest cost
don't know about the PhotoExpress adapter, but the fact that it puts the filters farther away from the lens than the others is not a good thing. if the difference is small - say, less than 1/8" - then it probably doesn't matter a great deal, and likely won't affect anything. but if it's more than that, i'd spend the extra $10-$15 and get one that puts filters as close to the lens as possible.


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Old Nov 25, 2005, 8:09 PM   #9
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LoveLife escribió:
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These are known as close-up filter sets you can have mine for the postage. Hoya and some other well know companies make them. They may work on 50mm fixed lenses but not on the FZ zoom. All these close-up filters are single element uncoated magnifying glass and are not worth xxx cents. Yes they do magnify but the image if made larger then a 3" x 3" is very poor.

Here is a picture with a cheap close-up filter. You can see the chromatic aberration in the edges of the coin. Buy the Nikon 6T and don't waste your money, as I did.
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Old Nov 25, 2005, 9:07 PM   #10
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Compelling .. thanks! Nikon it is!!
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