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Old Dec 11, 2005, 1:25 AM   #1
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I couldn't resist posting this photo, even with all it's flaws. It's been cropped - the bottom part of the photo was just fog. When I cropped it I rotated it a bit to straighten the (falling away) line. What's amazing is that I'm standing on Mt. Pinos, thesoutheast most point of the Kern County mountains. The mountains in the picture are the Southern Sierra Nevada mountains to the northeast, running at an angle away from me. They are located at least 60 miles away, across the (foggy) San Joaquin Valley. I'm awed that the lens on the FZ30 could capture them as well as this.
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Old Dec 11, 2005, 1:50 AM   #2
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get used to it, Mtngal... the FZ's have AMAZING optics!! i've gotten shots with my FZ20 that i would never have believed possible without a lens the size of a 2-liter soda bottle, and even after a year, sometimes it surprises me!
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Old Dec 11, 2005, 1:52 AM   #3
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Worth posting
Is the FZ30 not good


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Old Dec 11, 2005, 1:54 AM   #4
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squirl033 wrote:
Quote:
get used to it, Mtngal... the FZ's have AMAZING optics!! i've gotten shots with my FZ20 that i would never have believed possible without a lens the size of a 2-liter soda bottle, and even after a year, sometimes it surprises me!
I agree
A very wise squirrel
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Old Dec 11, 2005, 6:25 PM   #5
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This cameraIS awesome. I did a check using a map software to measure how far away this really was. I'm not sure exactly which mountain I was capturing, but it has to be at least 90 miles away, and more likely over 100 miles away. I've tried to capture the same view in the past using the Sony F717 and just got a white line in a sea of blue.
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Old Dec 11, 2005, 11:35 PM   #6
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Mtngal, Here is what your mountains really look like ! Jim
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Old Dec 12, 2005, 9:01 AM   #7
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Wow!

Let's see if I can guess how you got it to look so much better (or how I'd do it). I think I would have used levels in photoshop to change the white balance, then adjusted the contrast a bit? If you adjust for the blue shift you might not have to adjust contrast? That's all a guess on my part. I've been concentrating on the camera so much, I haven't been doing much other post processing, other than the balloons. Besides - Iwas so totally distracted by the detail that the camera picked up!
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Old Dec 12, 2005, 1:56 PM   #8
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Mtngal, Pretty close ! All I did was go to levels and used auto adjust, that took care of the blue cast and brought out the color and detail. Jim
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Old Dec 12, 2005, 3:21 PM   #9
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This brings up a question about post processing. The original shot was a raw photo, so I could have adjusted the white balance with Adobe raw converter (just didn't think of it). Or I could just bring it into photoshop without adjustment and make the changes with levels. Which way is better? Is there any difference? I sometimes get too "fussy" and change things too much, which can really mess up a nice picture, so I wasn't making many changes this weekend. What's the best way of not over-correcting?
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Old Dec 12, 2005, 4:06 PM   #10
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Mtngal, I find the best way of correcting to load the picture into Photoshop. make a duplicate layer of the picture and work with that layer. I usually try levels or curves first, depending on what I want to correct. Working with the duplicate layer try auto correction first and see if you get the results you want. If not then try manual adjustments. I also find that using 'Exposure' and 'Highlights and Shadows' will do wonders on some seemingly bad pictures! That's the nice thing about Photoshop, there is no lack of tools to use for corrections and enhancements! Since your working with a duplicate layer if you mess up just dump it and make another layer. Jim
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