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Old Jan 3, 2006, 1:52 AM   #41
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ttkbear wrote:
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Pond with filter.

In this case, I prefer the looks of the picture without the filter, but the polarizer certainly did its job of cutting the reflection to where you can see the bottom of the lake.
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Old Jan 3, 2006, 1:55 AM   #42
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Wow. Big difference. This is what I remember the CP did on my 35mm SLR. I'm just not seeing the same with new filter/new camera.

I must be doing something wrong. Even tried the water shots and whilest it's better it's not that good.

Thanks ttkbear for the great examples.




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Old Jan 3, 2006, 2:32 AM   #43
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Grant2 wrote:
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Wow. Big difference. This is what I remember the CP did on my 35mm SLR. I'm just not seeing the same with new filter/new camera.

I must be doing something wrong. Even tried the water shots and whilest it's better it's not that good.

Thanks ttkbear for the great examples.




Are you adjusting it properly? The axis has to be lined up exactly according to the influx of light in order to achieve the desired effect. In some cases there will be no visible difference, in others (situations with a lot of light from the side and reflections and glare) it can be dramatic.
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Old Jan 3, 2006, 12:29 PM   #44
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rduve, you're correct. As I spin the filter the effects change dramtically and depending on the direction of the light source and it's relative position to the object, there may not be any change at all when using the filter.

Are the effects of a linear filter the same?
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Old Jan 3, 2006, 12:35 PM   #45
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Linear results should be essentially the same. Keep in mind that one can put marks on the polarizer ring to indicate when its at full effect and one where its at minimum effect. Saves a lot of time adjusting when photo op is passing.

One can use polarized sunglasses at right angle to confirm when at max effect (no light passing...) Use a dot of clear nail polish at either extreme on the rotating ring and lens base.
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Old Jan 3, 2006, 2:50 PM   #46
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Telecorder wrote:
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Linear results should be essentially the same. Keep in mind that one can put marks on the polarizer ring to indicate when its at full effect and one where its at minimum effect. Saves a lot of time adjusting when photo op is passing.

One can use polarized sunglasses at right angle to confirm when at max effect (no light passing...) Use a dot of clear nail polish at either extreme on the rotating ring and lens base.

Most polarizer have a little notch for that purpose. You align it with the angle of the sun to get the full effect.
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Old Jan 3, 2006, 2:59 PM   #47
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rduve wrote:
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Most polarizer have a little notch for that purpose. You align it with the angle of the sun to get the full effect.
Duuh, so that's what the little white dot on the Hoya's adjusting ring is for...!

If I understand your comments correct, one just 'dials' the mark to orient it to the sun'selevation and you're at max polarization effect? And then rotate either way away from that point until the desired effect is reached?





Thanks, Rduve!
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Old Jan 3, 2006, 5:56 PM   #48
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Telecorder: You got it!



:-)
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Old Jan 4, 2006, 4:47 PM   #49
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About the first 4 pictures of this thread:

I like the skies without the polarizer more natural the with it. I's expected more.

I was thinking of buying a polarizer for landscape pictures to avoi those blown out skies, but i'm not sure now if it does the job .

The leafes are nice though
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Old Jan 4, 2006, 7:48 PM   #50
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I think, in these images, the effect to the sky is due the angle the picture was taken. In my limited experience, when I use a polarizing filterfor landscape shots, the sky becomes a deeper blue and can make some colors standout at little more. In most cases, I like the effects of polarizering filtersbut it's all personal choice. Experiment and see for yourself.
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