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Old Dec 27, 2005, 7:12 PM   #1
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Polariser set to minimum effect....

FZ30 set at -1/3 EV and centre metering used for all shots....





Polariser set to MAX effect







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Old Dec 29, 2005, 11:33 AM   #2
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You seem to be enjoying that polarizer John!
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Old Dec 29, 2005, 2:59 PM   #3
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genece wrote:
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You seem to be enjoying that polarizer John!
Yes I am Gene its quite effective on the FZ30 for controlling specular reflections, its an old Circular Polariser from my film SLR days.
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Old Dec 29, 2005, 3:45 PM   #4
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Hi, Boyzo. I can understand the circular polarizer eliminating those blown highlights, since they're reflections. But the overall increased brightness of the background? Did you use either a smaller aperture or a slower shutter speed in the second photo?
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Old Dec 29, 2005, 6:36 PM   #5
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Koosla wrote:
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Hi, Boyzo. I can understand the circular polarizer eliminating those blown highlights, since they're reflections. But the overall increased brightness of the background? Did you use either a smaller aperture or a slower shutter speed in the second photo?
#1 pic = f5.6 @ 1/160

#2 pic = f5.6 @ 1/80

Not sure why it turned out that way :roll:
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Old Dec 29, 2005, 8:38 PM   #6
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boyzo wrote:
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Koosla wrote:
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Hi, Boyzo. I can understand the circular polarizer eliminating those blown highlights, since they're reflections. But the overall increased brightness of the background? Did you use either a smaller aperture or a slower shutter speed in the second photo?
#1 pic = f5.6 @ 1/160

#2 pic = f5.6 @ 1/80

Not sure why it turned out that way :roll:

John, you used double the exposure time on the second shot. that's why it's so much brighter. If that's what the autoexposure gave you, consider underexposing by a stop. I agree, that it is too light. Nevertheless, you made your point that the circular polarizer certainly does its job in cutting down on reflections.
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Old Dec 29, 2005, 9:05 PM   #7
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rduve wrote:
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boyzo wrote:
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Koosla wrote:
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Hi, Boyzo. I can understand the circular polarizer eliminating those blown highlights, since they're reflections. But the overall increased brightness of the background? Did you use either a smaller aperture or a slower shutter speed in the second photo?
#1 pic = f5.6 @ 1/160

#2 pic = f5.6 @ 1/80

Not sure why it turned out that way :roll:

John, you used double the exposure time on the second shot. that's why it's so much brighter. If that's what the autoexposure gave you, consider underexposing by a stop. I agree, that it is too light. Nevertheless, you made your point that the circular polarizer certainly does its job in cutting down on reflections.
Rainer.... I should have used exposure lock for the comparo.... a good feature :idea:

Still learning the FZ30....

I tend to always use aperture priority. btw


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Old Dec 29, 2005, 9:59 PM   #8
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the camera chose the longer exposure to compensate for the polarizer, which decreased the light reaching the sensor by a full stop at least at max effect. most of the time, if you watch the shutter speed as you rotate the polarizer, you'll see it slow down as the filter reaches max effectiveness, and the speed up again as you turn the polarizer past the max effectivity point.
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Old Dec 29, 2005, 11:29 PM   #9
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squirl033 wrote:
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the camera chose the longer exposure to compensate for the polarizer, which decreased the light reaching the sensor by a full stop at least at max effect. most of the time, if you watch the shutter speed as you rotate the polarizer, you'll see it slow down as the filter reaches max effectiveness, and the speed up again as you turn the polarizer past the max effectivity point.
Ok

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