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Old Jan 18, 2006, 4:36 AM   #1
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After the first days with my fz30 I took a couple of nice pics but I never had such difficulties to avoid blurry pictures like with this camera. Maybe I hoped for too much concerning that "super IS" but shouldn´t I see a difference? When I turn the IS off and on some pics are blurry and some are sharp, both in either mode. :sad:
please take a look at the attached dog muzzle (100% crop) which is typical. That fellow was sleeping=not moving and I can´t take a sharp picture?? But then again suddenly some area in an indoor shot is sharp and then I think it can´t be the camera, it must be me. How can I find out if the OIS is working? Shouldn´t its effects be obvious?
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Old Jan 18, 2006, 4:43 AM   #2
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If the sutter speed is less than 1/10s IS can not help you to avoid blurry (it is for me - if you have more steady hand maybe you can do it better than me) and if you use zoom the blurry become stronger.

Sorry for my bad eng.
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Old Jan 18, 2006, 6:35 AM   #3
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Thank you sunstorage! It´s possible that I´ve tried it only in too "dark" conditions!
But it also means that the automode is not really useable indoors?!?! :?
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Old Jan 18, 2006, 7:13 AM   #4
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Also don't use OIS Mode 1. This mode is only suitable for making videos with the cam. Better use Mode 2. This one only activates when you press the shutter release button and gets you better stabilization results.

And true, shooting indoors is quite difficult. You have to train a lot to keep your hands calm and steady.
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Old Jan 18, 2006, 7:54 AM   #5
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pixelstuff wrote:
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It´s possible that I´ve tried it only in too "dark" conditions!
But it also means that the automode is not really useable indoors?!?!
Basically true, though not totally unuseable. (Furthermore, 100% crops are a little over the top.) Not only isthe camerastruggling to focus in lowlight but the OIS can only do so much. Learning the idiosyncracies of the camera is best done under more favorable conditions; ie, good light.Get a feel for how the camera handles good conditions and then take it to the margins.

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Old Jan 18, 2006, 7:58 AM   #6
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pixelstuff...ihave lost my 'steady hand' as i've hit my 50's and was pleased to find this exception camera also came with an IS system, so far everything that i would expect to come out steady have using IS2. That's not to say, that IS is the cure all for all handheld shots. What i would do is to put your cameraon a tripod or other type of 'steadyrest' and shoot a frame and then repeat the shot at the same relative time and conditionsusing a handheld method. Use your body as it's own steadyrest and hold the your arms into you body tosteadyyour hands and the camera and exhale and press the shutter button evenly and slowly...



This should give you a good idea if the camera is malfunctioning or the photographer is. If it turns out to be the photographer, concessions can be made by using a Monopod, using the flash more often in low light indorrs situations or using Shutter Priority and shooting at a faster shutter speed.



But I think the Tripod test will narrow it down for you.




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Old Jan 18, 2006, 10:52 AM   #7
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The thing I have found helps me in situations where the shutter speed is marginal for the focal length is to use burst mode. You usually hit at least one shot with minimal hand movement.

There isn't a set shutter speed you can handhold with. At wide angle you can be successful at 1/6 second with burst and a good holding technique. At full zoom you need 1/80 second. If you don't use the burst you can raise that to 1/8 second for wide and 1/100 for telephoto, and you need a very steady hold.

The old rule for handholding is to use the reciprocal of the 35mm focal length as the minimum shutter speed. On the FZ30 that would be 1/35 second at wide angle and 1/420 second at telephoto without stabilization. They optimistically rate good OIS at 3 f-stops, which would give about 1/8 second at wide angle and 1/100 second at telephoto. You have to do a mental sliding scale in between.

You have discovered the kink in that rule. As your resolution increases that number goes up for 100% viewing and large prints. If you printed the full shot with the 100% crop of your dog collar at 4 X 6 it would probably appear sharp.

Review the EXIF information on your images that came out soft. Multiply the focal length by 4.73 to get the 35mm equivalent. Better yet just multiply the focal length by 1.2 and take the reciprocal to get the minimum shutter speed with mode 2 stabilization. So full wide would need about 1/9 second and at telephoto about 1/106 seconds. At mid-zoom you need about 1/50 second. If you aren't generating those speeds you are asking too much of the OIS for large prints, extreme crops or 100% viewing.

You can raise the ISO from the default 80 to 100 and get a slight improvement in your shutter speed and not be appalled by the noise when you view it 100%. Above ISO 100 the noise gets objectionable. Once the camera gets to the reciprocal of the focal length it has the lens open all the way to give you all the shutter speed available for the light in program mode. Switching to shutter priority and setting a higher shutter will just give you dark photos.

You stripped the EXIF from the crop you posted. If we knew the focal length and shutter speed we might give more specific information. Crop in Irfanview and check to keep the EXIF when you resave in JPG. If you get sharp images on a tripod the problem is likely that you are expecting too much of the OIS. It is effective but not beyond 3 f-stops – and that might be a little optimistic. If you don't have a tripod just set the camera on something and use the self-timer. Of course you have to shoot a still subject. Neither a tripod nor stabilization helps for subject motion.

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Old Jan 18, 2006, 12:52 PM   #8
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I've never known about that telephoto rule. 1/100 at telephoto? I've been using 1/13 and getting pretty good results, sometimes even with extended zoom. Perhaps I am steadier than most, but if you want to try the technique I use, check this older post of mine:http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...mp;forum_id=23
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Old Jan 18, 2006, 1:12 PM   #9
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pixelstuff wrote:
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But then again suddenly some area in an indoor shot is sharp and then I think it can´t be the camera, it must be me. How can I find out if the OIS is working? Shouldn´t its effects be obvious?
Just an observation, but I've had pay far more attention to focus distances than I used to because it is so easy to turn the zoom a bit too much and be too close for the camera to focus.I've occasionallyhad problems with the AF locking onto something other than what I want it to focus on. I've had limited success with manual focus, especially outdoors (my eyes don't work as well as they used to), so it's harder for me to tell if it has focused on what I want it to. And it seems to haveshallower DOF than my old camera did, another thing to bear in mind when taking photos (I pay more attention to f stop than I did before).

I took a series of shots using a small tripod to support the camera and used all 3 IS settings (none, mode 1 and mode 2) to see if there was any noticeable difference if there was no camera motion. I couldn't tell any difference between them (I had wondered if some of my soft photos were because the camera was over-correcting in some way, and wanted to see if there was any difference without motion). I used mode 1 this past weekend and got some nice sunrises and sunsets while shooting through the windshield and windows of a car moving at speeds faster than 60 mph (100 kph) - the only pictures I liked from this weekend.

I've been trying to keep my shutter speeds above 1/100, choosing a smalleraperture openingunless I really want a small DOF, and using Neat Image more because I'm more likely to use ISO 200, and that's helped some. If you find something else that seems to help, let me know.
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Old Jan 18, 2006, 1:32 PM   #10
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Regarding the dog muzzle pic...

Were you shooting very close to dog NOT in macro mode or a few feet away in macro mode?

Either way, that could also cause what you see.

I found with my FZ30 that there is appreciable noise on indoor shots sans flash.

With flash, much better results
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