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Old Mar 18, 2006, 3:08 PM   #1
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Come to me all those who are heavy ladened and I will give you rest
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Old Mar 18, 2006, 3:21 PM   #2
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Very good shot
It seems that you are IR expert (or will become one very soon). So may I ask you a question.
I tried with FZ20 to take an IR shot with not-exposed but developed film and this is the result (the attached image is not edited)
For me this shot is not good (not IR like)
In the setup I used Hama UV filter - is it possible this to "damage" the IR efect?
Is this shot looks normal for you?

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Old Mar 18, 2006, 3:54 PM   #3
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Can someone please explain the IR process, how is it different? I understand IR capabilities were available in some earlier models (FZ1 and/or FZ2), but not in the FZ10, for instance...

chung, cool pic.
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Old Mar 18, 2006, 4:57 PM   #4
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Chung:

This is a really effective photo. Good job.
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Old Mar 18, 2006, 5:34 PM   #5
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Me an IR expert ? No -lah. Just playing around until I get fed with it or until I get a proper Hoya R72 filter!

I used 2 pieces of exposed film negatives on top of each other. I used it form my mom's recent photos negatives ( she had opened the camera flim bay when the film was still inside and not rewinded) so the exposure was complete and the negative wasted. And the flim has an even dark brown tint, and looks black to the human eye when two pieces are held together.

I also have a UV filter and it shouldn't make a difference.

stuck the negatives with some cellotape and cardboard to attach to my lens adaptor. Covered the holes on top and the bottom of the negatives with cardboard or zoom in a little or just crop it out later. Set the custom white balance with the negatives in place. Place on a tripod and adjsut the shutter speed accordingly.

The post process with the action from this site http://www.outdooreyes.com/photo94.php3 and that's it. Its not like those real IR I suppose but fun to try.

I dunno since you are using developed but not fully exposed negatives if using more layers >2 will help. Until its opaque to the human eye.
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Old Mar 18, 2006, 6:28 PM   #6
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10x chung
Maybe the reason of my bad shots is that I used not-exposed but developed film but you use fully exspoed but not developed film (am I understand you correct?).
As I know this the characterisitic of the film will change dramaticaly when it is treated with chamicals
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Old Mar 19, 2006, 2:46 AM   #7
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My mom opened the camera and quickly closed it back when she saw it the film was not rewinded. The negatives was sent to be developed. When the negatives came out, a few frames were overexposed and useless.

Hence the negatives were exposed and developed.
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Old Mar 19, 2006, 11:59 AM   #8
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Were those Colour or B/W negatives; or is that not important at all?
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