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Old Apr 5, 2006, 10:27 PM   #1
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When I change the setting to Macro AF and try a closeup I cannot tell the difference on a closeup with regular AF. I do notice that it seems to change the shutter speed slighlty when I depress the button half-way. What does the setting actually do?
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Old Apr 6, 2006, 8:00 AM   #2
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macro AF enables the AF to focus on objects that are closer to the lens than regular AF permits. With regular AF anything too close (can't remember the measurements) will not be able to focus - the camera will keep 'hunting'. Switching to macro AF allows it to lock onto subjects that are very close to the lens.

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Old Apr 6, 2006, 8:09 AM   #3
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matt_xyz wrote:
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macro AF enables the AF to focus on objects that are closer to the lens than regular AF permits. With regular AF anything too close (can't remember the measurements) will not be able to focus - the camera will keep 'hunting'. Switching to macro AF allows it to lock onto subjects that are very close to the lens.

Matt
I couldn't tell the difference either... it seemed to focus OK in either case, but I'll pay more attention next time I try it.I assume then the reverse is true in the sense if you leave it in macro and try to focus on distant objects then it should have a problem with focus.


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Old Apr 6, 2006, 10:12 AM   #4
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Just my guess: This is mainly for using one of the multi-area autofocus modes. Then with the switch at normal AF will just focs whatever (or as much as) possible.
With the switch at macro-AF it will rather focus on the closest focusable object that is currently in frame.

I think with center-spot focus this switch does mostly not make any difference. It can be understood as some sort of a selector for your preferred focal behaviour. But of course there are many situations where there is not enough depth of field in the areas that can be focused with the selected af-mode.

Think of a flower. You focus it with spot-focus. It will not matter whether you select normal AF or macro-AF. It will just focus what you point at. But if there are, for instance, two flowers, one is 1m away and the other 4m, and you are in multiarea autofocus mode, then the normal AF mode could possibly either select the farmost flower or the nearmost, (if they are both within the possible focal range). But with the switch to macro-AF, the camera will surely pick the front flower (if in multiarea...).

Does that sound right? At least its what I guess and have so far experienced.

Pit
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Old Apr 6, 2006, 3:59 PM   #5
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Do the following:

Zoom back your lens to 35mm equivalent. In regular AF place an object 2 or 3 inches in front of the lens and try to focus. It will not be able to. Now switch to Macro AF and try again. It will now focus on anything as close as around 1 inch away from the lens.

I think this is true whichever AF mode you are using.

When you zoom out the difference between regular AF and macro AF seems to disappear, it's only intended to help focus on objects extremely close to the lens.

Matt
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Old Apr 6, 2006, 4:26 PM   #6
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I thought it was clear, that the macro-AF mode is of course to be used for macros (which are per definition very close objects).

But for the additional function in multi-area-focusing mode I just made two sample pictures.



Macro AF





same scene with normal AF

So the camera does focus on the nearest object that is still focusable automatically if in Macro AF mode. Even if its almost out of frame.
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Old Apr 6, 2006, 9:31 PM   #7
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Leberwurstsaft wrote:
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I thought it was clear, that the macro-AF mode is of course to be used for macros (which are per definition very close objects).

The concept of what it is for or intendedis clear and I never had any doubts. The reason I started the thread was that when I triedMacro AF vs. Normal AF on a close object, I saw no noticeable change. Both times the focus worked well on my subject. I did notice that the shutter speed changed slightly, but that may have been a coincidence even though it seemed to happen every time.
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