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Old May 2, 2006, 5:38 AM   #1
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Hi, I have had my FZ20 for over a year now and have only been interested in Photography for a little while longer than that. I have mostly been using the Auto mode on the camera and would like to make the step up to the manual settings, but am a bit lost with them.

Does any one have any links to explain the Aperture, ISO, and Shutter settings?

I mainly take night shots, landscapes, animals and will try and get some rally sport shots too this season... I am also interested in Macro photography as i am fascinated by spiders, and was looking at the MCON35 lens.
What settings would you use for these sort of shots in both overcast and bright sunny mornings, or late twilight evenings?
All ideas and help is much appreciated…
Another setting I leave to automatic is the white balance, I understand about colour temperatures, but not sure when I should change this…
Yes, I have much to learn
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Old May 2, 2006, 5:50 AM   #2
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Hi Ron

Welcome to the forum ! I think you shoudl definetely have a read of the FZ10 User guide, which you can find here:

http://www.users.bigpond.com/vkelim/DMCFZ10/

Have good read and you'll find a lot of very good info on the FZ10/20's, what settings to use, macro lens, etc.

For night shots - set the FZ to the lowest ISO - ISO80 for the FZ20, full manual mode so you can control the aperture and shutter speed but if your just starting out I'd try aperture priority first. Use a tripod and turn off the IS this will give you tack sharp images. Personally for the best results I have all in cam settings set to low - contrast, saturation and sharpness and then make any adjustments I need in Photoshop. The FZ10/15/20 have a tendency to over expose so I normally underexpose the shot by -1/3 to -1 although that isn;t issue for night.

There's a wealth of info and talent here in the forum and I'm sure a lot of the guys and girls are more than willing to help.

Cheers

HarjTT


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Old May 2, 2006, 6:19 AM   #3
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woow there is a lot to say

Ok i think its important if you actualy understand each of the aspects and what they do. Usually with this info its quite self explanatory to choose settigns

APERTURE
This is the opening in the front of the cam. A low fstop number (e.g. 2.8) stands for a large opening. So essentially a high fstop # means a small opening.


f2.8 - Large opening
f11 - Small opening|

k so what does this mean for the user. Now obviously the larger the opening the more light can get into the camera. So one of the advantages of a small fstop# is that it will increase your shutter speed bcse the cam needs less time to capture adequate light levels. SO see the example below. This is random numbers out of my head. If you were to compose a shot at different fstops you will see the shutter value changing.


If you had your fstop set to 3.6 (Big opening) your shutter would be 1/100 for this example, if the same shot was composed at fstop 5.6 shutter speed will be a lot slower.

F2.8 – Lots of light, Higher shutter speed
F11+ - Small amount of light – Lower shutter speed


Now aperture also controls the depth of field of your image (The range of the shot which is in focus). So if you want to compose a shot with a blurry backing and subject nice and sharp use a lo fstop to create a shallow depth of field. If composing a landscape you want a large range in focus so use a hi fstop.

F2.8 – Shallow depth of field (Portrait maybe, macro work, blurry backing images)
F11+ - Vast depth of field (Landscape, images where you want a huge amount in focus)


So at the end of the day

F2.8: Large opening, Hi amount of light input, results I higher shutter speed, shallow depth of field
F11: Small opening, Lower amount of light input, results in lower shutter speed, Vast depth of field




SHUTTER SPEED
Shutter speed is the time the shutter is exposing the ccd to the light in order to capture an image. Basically the slower the shutter speed the more light captured as the cam is letting more light in and vise versa.

HI SHUTTER SPEEDS 1/200+
Hi shutter speeds enable you to capture fast moving action without resulting in blurry images. Of course you need to set your shutter speed accordingly. If you are shooting flying birds you may want a fast shutter around 1/500. If shooting walking horse you can prob afford to come down to 1/100. Inadequate shutter speed is 1 of the main causes of blurry images. Remember if the shutter is open to long and the cam moves or shakes while the shutter is open the image will be blurry.


LO SHUTTER SPEEDS 1/10-
Slow shutter speeds are usually used for time lapse shots. Long exposure is needed for night time photography. If shooting the moon etc you will need very long shutter speeds and a tripod is a must.


A nice rule I was told by another member online is you choose your shutter speed by your 35mm focal lngth equiv. So if your shooting at wide angle 35mm. then select a shutter speed of 1/30 etc.

COMBINATIONS
Combining the Aperture and Shutter Speed is wat makes your shots. You need to determine the effect you want and the situation you are shooting. Use APERTURE PRIORITY or SHUTTER PRIORITY.




ISO
Iso is a std to determine the sensitivity of the ccd. So the more sensitive the ccd the less time needed to capture the equivalent amount of light.


So if you were metering a shot at 35mm (35equiv) and the cam spat out
At iso100 – A shutter speed of 1/10
You may think this shutter speed is alil low and you might get motion bluring.If you wind up iso
At iso400 – a resulting shutter speed maybe 1/30-1/40
Much faster shutter meaning les chance of motion blurring.


So basically the higher you wind your iso level the higher the resulting shutter speed. So if your capturing some very fast action or you are shooting in poor lighting conditions and its difficult to get clean non-blurry shots hi iso is an option. Now like everything there is a downside. Increased iso means increased noise in your shots. So you have to make a compromise.

ISO80: Lo sensitivity, Lower noise, lower shutter speed, more chance of blurring
ISO400+: Hi sensitivity, Higher Noise, Higher shutter speed, less chance of blurring




SHOOTING MODES
In mode cases I shoot in APERTURE priority mode. As above when I want shots of birds with tht blurry backing look I select APERTURE priority and selct a lo fstop (3.6etc) and set my iso level accordingly. With the panas I try to keep my iso as lo as possible to keep my shots as noise free as possible.


If you are shooting car racing I would use shutter priority at around 1/200 and again set iso accordingly.



Hope this helps


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Old May 2, 2006, 6:40 AM   #4
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Wow,

Thanks to both HarjTT and kenmck15 for all the advice, i have taken a quick read over both the manual and the quick guide above and I think I am finally understanding it a whole lot better now.

Now I will will need to take this into the field and see what's what. I will take a subject at the weekend and play with all the settings and see what happens.

Thanks again

I will even make myself a quick noobie guide for my camera bag too until i get to grips with all the settings...
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Old May 2, 2006, 6:47 AM   #5
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r0nn13 wrote:
Quote:
Wow,

Thanks to both HarjTT and kenmck15 for all the advice, i have taken a quick read over both the manual and the quick guide above and I think I am finally understanding it a whole lot better now.

Now I will will need to take this into the field and see what's what. I will take a subject at the weekend and play with all the settings and see what happens.

Thanks again

I will even make myself a quick noobie guide for my camera bag too until i get to grips with all the settings...

good on ya mate, hey i have only been in photography for about 8 months now and i found the best way to learn was to see everyones shots i liked and try to copy them. This really exersized the mind and makes you think back to what each aspect is and how it enhances the image.

Also if you see a shot you really like, save it to your computer, then find the file, right click it, hit properties, click summary then click advnaced and hopefuylly the exif data isnt removed. here you can see the exact settings the person used when they took the shot. and using this youcan copy and learn.
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