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Old May 11, 2006, 5:52 PM   #11
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tclune,

Do you think something like this would be a better choice:

http://www.vistek.ca/details/details...=CameraFilters

This they have in stock and will move a little on.

Thanks.
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Old May 11, 2006, 5:58 PM   #12
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You might look at the Hoya HMC UV Clear at:

http://www.2filter.com/hoya/hoyauvsky01.html



$19.77 including shipping...
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Old May 11, 2006, 7:12 PM   #13
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B+W are well-regarded filters. I don't know anything in particular about this one, but again I would worry about whether a haze filter would impart a yellow cast -- the usual difference between UV filters and "haze" or "skylight" filters is that the latter generally filter into the visible region as well as up in the UV. For a filter that you want to use solely for physical protection, you want it to be as invisible to the camera optics as possible, and these other filters just don't fit that bill. You could always do a manual white balance before shooting to subtract the bias off, but is that really how you want to work? If you're using a filter for its desireable filtering properties, and have to contend with the downside on a case-by-case basis, fine. But, for an always-on piece of glass, do you really want to constantly have to think about it and adjust for it? Probably not. I'd suggest you take a look at Telecorder's suggestion, but I don't use a UV filter for lens protection, so I'm not really experienced in this aspect of filter selection. My help will be minimal on them.


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Old May 12, 2006, 3:05 AM   #14
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Old May 12, 2006, 3:05 AM   #15
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Old May 12, 2006, 3:06 AM   #16
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A comment on GND filters, they're quite a bit more work than standard ND filters, because of their nature you need a filter holder (Cokin A-system for most of the Panasonic digicams) and then the filters themselves. The filter holder will interfere with your lens cap/lens hood, so you may need Cokin-specific versions of those (Cokin for example have a lens cap that fits into the holder itself). Then you need the GND filter itself... add all that up, and you're doing a lot more fiddling with add-on bits and pieces for a GND than a generic ND. In addition while you can get high-quality MC optical-glass ND filters, I've never seen any indication of what Cokin's GND's are made with (some people seem to set great stock on this).

Having said that, when you need a GND you really *need* a GND.

(Apologies for the empty posts above, the server reported SQL errors when I originally tried to submit the message).
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Old May 12, 2006, 9:03 AM   #17
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Lens Flare wrote:
Quote:
A comment on GND filters, they're quite a bit more work than standard ND filters, because of their nature you need a filter holder (Cokin A-system for most of the Panasonic digicams) and then the filters themselves...
While a Cokin-style holder affords a desireable additional degree of freedom in placement of the GND transition, it is simply not true that you NEED this. Most GNDs are circular and just rotate like a polarized filter, to allow you to orient the dark half however you choose.

If you have a sharp transition version of a GND, this is a real problem, but I have only used the circular GNDs, and I can say from experience that the more-common gradualtransition versionsare easy to use (I would almost say "intuitive') and quite forgiving in placement of the transition region. Because they are gradual across the range, they don't introduce a sharp break, and improve the dynamic rangewithout causing problems any time I have used one.


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Old May 12, 2006, 8:11 PM   #18
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For those who are worried about how much of the spectrum different 'haze', UV or 'skylight' filters might cut into, Marumi now make a range of 'Lens Protect' filters - essentially clear, coated filters designed to simply sit on the front of your digital camera for lens protection (they seem well designed for minimising interior reflections) - I have been using one for a couple of months on my raynox FZ20 adapter and it seems fine...
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Old May 14, 2006, 12:00 AM   #19
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>While a Cokin-style holder affords a desireable additional degree of freedom
>in placement of the GND transition, it is simply not true that you NEED this.
>Most GNDs are circular and just rotate like a polarized filter, to allow you
>to orient the dark half however you choose.

Hmm, but that's really the problem isn't it, that you can only get a dark half, not a dark third, or 20%, or 10%, or 75%. I admit I've never used a circular GND, and because of where I live (NZ) the sunlight is pretty bright so I've used GNDs with a fairly marked transition from ND to non-ND (if you used a softer transition you'd either get a band of odd brightness along the skyline or too-deep shadow just below the skyline), but I was under the impression that you really needed the flexibility to adjust where you wanted the ND effect to occur.

>If you have a sharp transition version of a GND, this is a real problem, but
>I have only used the circular GNDs, and I can say from experience that the
>more-common gradual transition versions are easy to use (I would almost say
>"intuitive') and quite forgiving in placement of the transition region.
>Because they are gradual across the range, they don't introduce a sharp
>break, and improve the dynamic range without causing problems any time I have
>used one.

Do you think they'd still work OK when you're got pretty serious dynamic range variations (and in particular a fairly abrupt change at one point)? I'd never even considered them until now, mostly because I had the impression that they were rather limited in their applicability.

(Somewhat off-topic but related to my original post, I mentioned the Cokin system there, their graduated filters aren't actually graduated ND but graduated grey, which can give a slight colour cast to pictures taken. I haven't found it to be that much of a problem, but some people prefer to use non-Cokin filters in the Cokin holders).
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Old May 14, 2006, 10:29 AM   #20
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As I mentioned, the circular ones are the only ones that I've used, and with a gradual gradation, they work quite well. You do not get any noticeable banding under any circumstances that I've experienced. I don't doubt that the Cokin approach could be an improvement, but I've never found the circular style a problem -- so I've never bothered with the added hassle of their arrangement.


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