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Old May 11, 2006, 1:29 PM   #1
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Howdy all,

I've got an FZ30 on the way and I plan on having two filters attached all the time: a Tiffen warming filter (using instead of a UV filter) and a Heliopan polarizer. I'll then have the Cokin P holder at the end, in which I'll drop any other filters if needed.

I was thinking of getting the Singh-Ray Blue/Gold polarizer (in Cokin P format). Could I just drop that in in front of the Heliopan polarizer? Aside from the extra light loss (not a problem, will be shooting in bright light), are there any other problems? Can polarizers be combined successfully?
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Old May 11, 2006, 1:40 PM   #2
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pibrahim wrote:
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I was thinking of getting the Singh-Ray Blue/Gold polarizer (in Cokin P format). Could I just drop that in in front of the Heliopan polarizer? Aside from the extra light loss (not a problem, will be shooting in bright light), are there any other problems? Can polarizers be combined successfully?
Not sure why you feel you would ever need/want two polarizers... Once you've polarized the incoming light, a second polarizer would have no effect other than to act as a density filter.

Not sure if it would work anyway as most polarizers I've seen don't have the front threads that would allow additional filters to be attached in front because of the rotating bezel. Perhaps the items you're referring to would allow the additional polarizer to be 'dropped in' but, if so, would you still be able to rotate the bezel for adjusting the second polarizer? If so, what effects are you hoping the dual set of polarizers would afford you that couldn't be had by a ND or other filter to lower the light levels into the sensor?

At least that's my understanding of the issues -- others may have differing opinions, though...
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Old May 11, 2006, 1:44 PM   #3
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I believe the Heliopan filter has front threads - I read that its only their slim filters which lack the front threads.

The Singh-Ray polarizer would be a drop-in filter for the Cokin holder, but can still be rotated (and thus wouldn't affect the rotation of the Heliopan either). In reality, I could unscrew the Heliopan every time I use the Singh-Ray, but if there's no real reason not to then I'd like to opt for the convenience of keeping it in....

The Singh-Ray Blue/Gold polarizer's effects are very different to a normal polarizer. Check out - http://www.singh-ray.com/goldnblue.html-
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Old May 11, 2006, 1:56 PM   #4
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Interesting polarizing filter for special effects. I'll defer to other, more experienced members but I would tend to think that the Singh-Ray Blue/Gold polarizer effects would be much less effective if it were combined with a standard polarizer as both are designed to attenuate the polarized reflected light rays...

Might make for some interesting field test results, though...
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Old May 11, 2006, 2:15 PM   #5
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if you put two polarizers on at once, one of them must always be 180 degrees out of phase with the other. if you rotate them both into phase, you will block everything.

if you want to let in less light, get a neutral density filter.

most polarizers do have front threads. at least all the brands i've ever owned do, including the Hoyas i use now.

there's no need to leave any polarizer on all the time, unless you plan on shooting only outdoors and only in bright light. for many situations, though, a polarizer serves no purpose, and in low light, makes it just that much harder to get a good exposure. read up on what polarizers do, and what they're for, and you'll probably realize that keeping on on the camera at all times is not a good idea.
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Old May 11, 2006, 10:34 PM   #6
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Thanks for the comments guys.

Sounds like the two together might not be ideal. I would ditch the Heliopan and get another drop-in polarizer instead; but I don't want a Cokin and the Singh-Ray is expensive (don't wanna buy *two* v.expensive filters).

I think keeping the polarizer on all the time should be okay for my conditions - I'll be shooting while hiking in Texas and the lighting should be great. I don't plan on using the camera too much at night as it's too big to lug around downtown all the time, and we won't be indoors too much either (getting back in touch with Mother Nature!). Might be able to get away with it...
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Old May 12, 2006, 8:29 PM   #7
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I have a Hoya colour polariser - and I find I hardly ever use it. Useful for special effects now and then - but mostly I find it changes the look of the scene way too much to be generally useful (and even in bright light, the f-stops you lose make shots of wildlife - or plants in windy conditions - much more difficult to get adequate shutter speeds for).

Two crossed linear polarisers have some advantages (note circular does not work for this) over a fixed depth ND filter - since by varying the relative angle of rotation beween them you essentially get a variable strength ND. (Noting that for every extra filter you add to the front of the camera, there is another bit of possible image degradation/ghosting or light flair/reflection between your sensor and your object...)
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Old May 12, 2006, 10:33 PM   #8
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Does the Hoya polarizer work in the same way as the Cokin Blue/Gold, or the Singh-Ray Blue/Gold? The latter is a lot more subtle and only seems to affect those two colours, whereas the Cokin one is a lot more heavy-handed and produces somewhat garish images. Maybe I've just seen bad photos with the Cokin one though...

The Heliopan polarizer is indeed linear, although IIRC, the Singh-Ray will be circular. Either way, I have a bit of time to think it over as the Heliopan is going back to B&H - it arrived today and it clearly wasn't new :-/
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Old May 13, 2006, 7:59 PM   #9
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I haven't used the Singh-Ray, though I would not mind having a go with one should the opportunity arise, to see what effects it gives... It probably is more subtle than the Hoya.
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