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Old May 28, 2006, 11:06 PM   #1
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Is their some built in advantage electronic wizzardy etc. in interchangeable lens digital cams have that digital cams with a single zoom lens don't have??
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Old May 28, 2006, 11:24 PM   #2
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since DSLR's are the only digital cameras with interchangeable lenses, i assume that's what you're asking about... well, the advantages i've found since i got mine are:

larger sensor = MUCH less noise
instant power on/"wake-up"
faster AF, able to stay focused on moving targets
no EVF lock-up, makes pan-shooting MUCH easier
faster shot-to-shot- 5 fps for up to 30 shots
much greater usable ISO range for low light
much sharper, clearer viewfinder - a real plus for manual focus

there are probably others, but these are the main ones that come to mind at the moment.

don't get me wrong... the FZ's are terrific cameras. anyone who's been on this board any length of time knows i love my FZ20, and it's capable of some pretty amazing things. but much as i like it, i like my 30D better. it just lets me do things faster, easier, and with more flexibility than i could with the FZ20.

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Old May 30, 2006, 6:02 PM   #3
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i second that, i just purchased a d50 and 18-70mm and i couldnt be hapier, it just allows so much more flexability and ease of use
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Old May 31, 2006, 6:59 PM   #4
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Thanks for your input- yes- that was the question- Why are DSLR's considered better than the digital cams with the built in zoom lens? If bigger sensors is an important factor in getting better pics - why don't the digital cams with zoom lens only incorporate bigger sensors- or do the manufacturers want to sell the more expensive DSLR's??
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Old May 31, 2006, 7:23 PM   #5
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because in order to yield that lovely 12x zoom, the lens for a larger sensor would also have to be much bigger. has to do with focal lengths and the size of the focal plane. look at a long telephoto lens for a DSLR; it's huge. for instance, the Sigma 50-500, which is only a 10x lens, is almost the size of a 2-liter bottle, and weighs almost 6 pounds! would you want to carry a lens that size on the front of your FZxx camera all the time? but that's the size it has to be to get that zoom ratio and still focus properly ona "full frame" sized sensor.

there are "intermediate" steps... the so-called 4/3 sensor, for instance, that provides a bit bigger sensor, andallows use oflenses that offer significant zoom ratios without being quite so large, but even with that sensor size, a 12x zoom would be agooddeal larger and heavier than the lenses on the FZ's. below the 4/3 sensor, you start getting into the smaller sizes like the 1/1.8, which is what the FZ30 uses, and which is probably about the largest you can really put in a compact superzoom without giving up some of the zoom ratio.Someone might come out with something between that and the 4/3, but for the moment, that's about as large as they can go without either giving up a bit oftelephoto capability or making the lenses much larger, heavier, and more expensive.

there are other features of DSLR's that make them superior.i listed a few. unfortunately, those features all add cost and complexity to the camera. my 30D, for instance, is a third larger and twice the weight of my FZ20 - and that's just the body! but DSLR's offer capabilities the typical compact superzoom can only wish for. that's why most people who want to "take it to the next level" eventually wind up buying a DSLR. not to say you can't get good photos with a superzoom. Lord knows, i've had some very nice results from my FZ20!! but for some of the things i like to do, the compact cameras just don't offer the flexibility, speed, and versatility that a DSLR does.

and yes, manufacturers do want to sell more expensive DSLR's. do you blame them? :lol:after all,if GM put the same features into a Chevy Malibu that they put into a Cadillac STS, who'd buy the Caddie? or, they'd have to make the Chevy just as expensive as the Cadillac, and no one would but the Chevy! it's all about marketing and choices, and the fact that "deluxe" capabilities come with a "deluxe" price tag.

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Old May 31, 2006, 7:34 PM   #6
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Now I must really thank you for this info.

Just one more question however- (promise- just one more)- Just what does this 'sensor' do, or why is a bigger one better? Thank you- FZlover
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Old May 31, 2006, 9:01 PM   #7
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the sensor in a digital camera is a matrix made up of millions of light-sensitive electronic devices called "photosites", each of which records a specific bit of data called a "pixel", which is short for "picture element". each pixel contains, typically, 2 green, 1 red and 1 blue elements; the combination of those colors which the photositerecords becomes a tiny colored dot corresponding to a part of the image the camera "sees". it's much like the old comic-book printing process. look ata comic illustration under a magnifying glass, and you'll see it's made up of little colored dots - "pixels" .as long as the dots are small enough and close enough together, your eye perceives them as a solid image. a digital camera creates an image in much the same way, using electronic "pixels" in place of those little dots of ink.the more dots, the finer each one is, and the smoother and sharper the image becomes (up to a point, but print sizes and image resolution is a whole 'nother discussion... :G) when the shutter is pressed, the sensor records these tiny dots of color, and sends them in digital form to the memory card.the resulting image is stored and downloaded to your computer as a photograph.

the intensity of the color, and the sensitivity of the sensor to light, are controlled by the ISO setting, which basically adjusts the amplification of the light which the sensor records.the higher the ISO number, the greater the amplification, and the more sensitive to light the sensor is. as the gain increases, though, so does the amount of heat the sensor generates; photosites are electronic devices, and as you increase the gain, they use more current and create more heat. heat causes noise, which is the "static" or grainy appearance you see in digital images sometimes. the reason larger sensors are less noisy is because the photosites are larger and more widely spaced, and they don't build up heat as quickly, or transfer it to their neighbors as much, as the smaller photosites crammed tightly onto a smaller sensor. example... the FZ30 has 9Mp stuffed onto a 1/1.8 sensor. my Canon 30D has 8.2Mp, spread out over the relatively huge surface of an APS-sized sensor, which has 10x the surface area. obviously, 8.2Mp on a sensor 10x the size means the photosites are much larger and not nearly as tightly packed, so heat build-up is not nearly as big a problem. this is why larger sensors offer high resolution with low noise, and why DSLRs can take images at ISO (gain) settings far higher than compact digicams like the FZ's...
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Old May 31, 2006, 10:12 PM   #8
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Thanks so much for the great explanation about those sensors. Appreciate it. FZlover
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Old Jun 1, 2006, 5:53 AM   #9
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http://www.dpreview.com/learn/?/Glos...r_sizes_01.htm

And the 5D ($4000) and 1DsMkII ($8000) cameras have sensors 2.5x as big (24x36mm) as the 30D.

And then the Medium format backs like the PhaseOne P45 ($20,000+) have sensors which are 3x larger again, about 8x the size of the 30D, or about 65x the size of sensor in the FZ7.


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Old Jun 1, 2006, 8:03 AM   #10
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peripatetic wrote:
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And then the Medium format backs like the PhaseOne P45 ($20,000+) have sensors which are 3x larger again, about 8x the size of the 30D, or about 65x the size of sensor in the FZ7.
I guess that sensor would be about the size of the fx01 - the whole camera that is. Speaking of which, how is the fx01 treating you? There are precious few users posting here. I recently posted some night shots I thought came out very nicely - zero responses!Very littleinterest in thistiny 28mm gem. Too bad.
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