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Old Jun 26, 2006, 1:28 AM   #41
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I have never owned a FL filter. I don't think you need it with the flash because the light from the flash overpowers the flourescent light anyway.
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Old Jun 26, 2006, 2:14 AM   #42
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reduve:

1)OK, I understand now, why I probably won't need to obtain an FL filter! Instead, I'll invest in a polarizer filter to go along with the Hoya(UV)filter.

2)Now, for my FZ30, since it is a digital camera, would a circular type polarizer filter work well for both the autofocus mode as well as for the manual focus mode?Or, should I just get an linear polarizer filter instead? Please clarify this? Thanks!
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Old Jun 26, 2006, 7:37 AM   #43
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Ideally for shooting indoors you want to white balance you camera to the lighting present in the room .Short of balancing in this manner there are numerous setting in the menu for white balance that will get you by in most lighting situations also auto WB works well and is used by many people most of the time.
As to polarizers a circular is proper for the camera you own.Camera filters. Hoya, Tiffen, B+W, Heliopan Low prices on filters for your camera
has links to filter information and explanations with examples of various kinds of filters and what they acomplish.

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Old Jun 26, 2006, 11:40 AM   #44
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KennJ:
1)Thanks for to great information!

2)Regarding UV Hoya filters, is the (UV)(O)suitable for average usage on an Panasonic FZ30 or would an(UV)(+1)filter be the one that I'd need? Or, will both of these work OK? Please clarify this? Thanks!
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Old Jun 26, 2006, 12:24 PM   #45
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Koolshot. The info you received on the polarizer is inaccurate. A linear polarizer works perfectly with the FZ30. No need to spend more on a circular polarizer. Circular polarizers are only recommended for SLR's because linear ones can interfere with their autofocus system. However my KM 5D works fine with a linear one. And it certainly works perfectly on the FZ30.The linear ones arecheaper and actually at least as effective as the circular ones.

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Old Jun 26, 2006, 5:37 PM   #46
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reduve:

1)Thanks for correcting the information regarding the polarizing filters-as I'll now select an linear polarizing filter, as you have advised!

2)Now, I'll need to know about the UV(O)filter that I'm about to obtain, to see if this zero rating will work OK with the FZ30 for the most part-or, if I'd need the UV(+1)rated ultraviolet filter instead-or, if either one of these would work well? Either of these would be the Hoya Super HMC UV filters! Please clarify this-so, I can change my order(If necessary?)from the (UV)(0)to the (UV)+!)filter, before my order has been shipped? Thanks!
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Old Jun 26, 2006, 8:32 PM   #47
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Again, I don't think that it matters much which UV filter you get. I think their importance is overrated. Glass lenses inherently shield out most UV rays anyway. I'd get it mainly for protection of your lens. The good part about the Hoya HMC filtersis their anti-reflective coating so you'll get almost 100 light transmission rather than reflecting a portion off of the filter.

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Old Jun 27, 2006, 10:18 AM   #48
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I beg to differ with rduves' opinion but as far as polarisiers go a circular is a bit more costly I admit but if cost is the objective rather than the best solution to various needs in photography most users would just buy a pocket camera and have done with it. I have both and find that the circular polariser gives me more for the money as does a multi-coated lens as opposed to a single coated one.Just my oppinion of course.
Anyway, it is best to read up on the tools you are interested in and make as informed a decision as you can as you will in the final analysis be the user of the equiptment you purchase. My apologies for perhaps breaking into this discussion and best of luck with your new camera.Good shooting.
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Old Jun 27, 2006, 11:28 AM   #49
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KennJ wrote:
Quote:
I beg to differ with rduves' opinion but as far as polarisiers go a circular is a bit more costly I admit but if cost is the objective rather than the best solution to various needs in photography most users would just buy a pocket camera and have done with it. I have both and find that the circular polariser gives me more for the money as does a multi-coated lens as opposed to a single coated one.Just my oppinion of course.
Anyway, it is best to read up on the tools you are interested in and make as informed a decision as you can as you will in the final analysis be the user of the equiptment you purchase. My apologies for perhaps breaking into this discussion and best of luck with your new camera.Good shooting.
KennJ


Kenn, a circular polarizer is not considered of higher quality than a linear one. There arehigher and lower quality polarizers in each category,but being circular is not automaticallybetter.They wereonly invented to not interfere with the beam-splitting auto focus technology of most SLR's since linear polarizers could throw off the AF and possibly metering.This does not apply to the FZ's or any digicams. This is not an opinion but fact.

Find another string on this subject here: http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...mp;forum_id=23.

As you see, it is indeed "best to read up on the tools you are interested in and make as informed a decisions you can". From my experience which is mirrored by several others in that string, linear polarizers actually create a stronger effect, simply because they are generally darker, thus more effective. Hope that helps.

On the other hand, it can't hurt to get a circular polarizer. It is guaranteed to work with all cameras, so you can keep it even if you upgrade to a DSLR. Interestingly, however, my linear polarizer works perfectly on my KM 5D.

Rainer

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Old Jun 27, 2006, 5:47 PM   #50
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Better quality comes from multi-coated lenses and of course they are costly in comparison to single coated glass. Guess I was not very clear on what I said or ment to say.
Plenty to read on the subject. A quick search at Google with linear vs circular polarisers gave way more info than I would ever consider reading.
I was simply offering an assist to a new camera owner and certainly not trying to get caught up in a argument or such. Lifes just to short.
Judging from the posts in this thread I imagine koolshot will look at all the angles well and work it out fine.
KennJ

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