Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Panasonic / Leica

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jun 23, 2006, 5:36 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 44
Default

I'm still working on improving my macro photography, so here's a few of my latest, all done with the FZ30 using a Nikon 4t, except for the extreme close-up was with (my new) dcr-250.









I've been using a Sunpak 383 with an omnibounce for fill, still getting the hang of getting the settings on that to jive with the settings in M mode on the camera.

Thanks for viewing,
T

P.S.: The pic with the raynox is significantly more impressive in 1600x1200 where you can see more detail in the eyes.
Twitch1977 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jun 26, 2006, 3:42 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
seemolf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 1,255
Default

I am a little bit sad, that this thread is not answered since friday!

We should not have unanswered threads in this forum.....

Especially this one ;-)

This is a good demonstration of our difficulties with depth of focus.

My favourite is #2 because bigger parts of the DF are in the focal plane.

There is no EXIF reader at hand..

Did you use the smallest aperture F/8,f/11 ?

Here is a comparison, what can be done with similar lenses:

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...amp;forum_id=7

...old macros, we can do better now.

You nearly touched this critter: congratulation and go on!

Sven


seemolf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 26, 2006, 5:04 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
simonbratt99's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 227
Default

fantastic shots, well done

How come he stayed so still? was he dead lol
simonbratt99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 26, 2006, 6:00 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Narmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 1,813
Default

I agree with Sven, #2 is great.
Odonata all have great textured wings.
DF are + 1,5 / 3 diopters insects, needless to use a DCR250 for them, they re too large.

I still have not had an opportunity to use Nikons T lenses for the Dragon and Damselflies I ve found, always shot them with FZ20 only.

Nar
Narmer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 26, 2006, 11:42 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 44
Default

It was sunny out, and I kept it at f/11 throughout, I need to figure out what cord I need so I can get my Sunpak out of the hotshoe and into my hand so i can get the fill lighting where I need it.

Most of these were taken with the Nikon 4t, the 3rd is the only one with the Raynox DCR-250 and although I like the shot it didn't turn out was well as I wanted. I went out hoping to retake it in full focus on Sunday but it was too windy. All these are uncropped shots so I probably could have done a lot better if I had zoomed out a bit more then cropped.

My pictures obviously pale in comparison to the ones in the thread you linked, I have an extremely difficult time controlling the depth of field to get shots like that especially with the Raynox (I've only had it about a week so I haven't had that much of a chance to play with it.)

Just a disclaimer the dragonfly was not dead and I'm sure he's still alive today. He was just extremely patient with me and let me take literally a 100 pictures or so of him. Every once in a while I'd disturb him and he'd fly off and make a few circles but he'd always come back to the same stick he was sitting on or one of the others near by.

Hopefully some day I'll be able to take macro shots that compare to the rest of the ones posted here. So if anyone has any tips on how I can make my feeble macro shots look more like the ones in the linked thread lemme have 'em.

Thanks for all your comments and for checking out my pics.
T

Twitch1977 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 26, 2006, 12:41 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
seemolf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 1,255
Default

I guess you don't need much advice, perhaps only some more practice.
As far as I can see you have done everything right.
Taking less zoom and a +2 diopter would have given tag sharp pictures of the whole insect, as long as the axis of the insect is in the focal plane.
But this was not what you intended to do. If I have to control small DOF, I lean on something now (beanbag, monopod, tripod).

I have just used this link in my thread:
http://tchuanye.smugmug.com/gallery/271702/1/6176903

tchuanye uses a similar equipment - I guess you know this link already?

Sven

http://www.geocities.com/seemolf/ach...achromats.html
seemolf is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:08 AM.