Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Panasonic Micro Four Thirds

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jul 12, 2010, 11:14 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Tullio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,370
Default

The Canon appears to be a good lens as well but it seems to me that the Vivitar is sharper.
__________________

Tullio
Tullio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 13, 2010, 3:18 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
mrmacmusic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Central Scotland
Posts: 274
Default

When it comes to sharpness, I think subject matter - and skill - come into the equation LOL! Donald's flowers (and butterfly) are beautifully shot with the Vivitar lens, but I reckon the Canon would perform very similarly given the same conditions...... maybe that should be my next challenge

FWIW, my "legacy" technique that day wasn't great, and I'm not convinced I haven't missed focus and/or should have stopped down to f/5.6 or f/8 considering how far away the squirrel was (the comparative shots with the 14-140 kit lens would have been at f/5.8) - although in my experience, the Canon is pretty sharp wide open at f/4.

Shutter speed was 'only' 1/320 (ISO 800) which might have been a touch slow considering I was right out at 210mm (420mm equivalent)....

Perhaps then the squirrel shot is a good example of how with the Canon FD (and presumably the Vivitar too?), shooting wide open at extreme telephoto, under everyday shooting situations, things can soften a touch from the 'optimum' either due to the lens or as a result of operator error/competence (incompetence)
mrmacmusic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 13, 2010, 10:18 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Tullio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,370
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrmacmusic View Post
... and I'm not convinced I haven't missed focus and/or should have stopped down to f/5.6 or f/8 considering how far away the squirrel was...

Shutter speed was 'only' 1/320 (ISO 800) ...
Well, if you stopped down to f/8, the shutter speed would have been even slower to compensate for the reduced light (and unless you had forced the ISO to 800, it could go up to 1600 as well, deteriorating the image further). I assume you were not using a tripod, in which case shooting at 400mm (200mm x 2) with shutter speed slower than 1/320, would probably have produce a blurred image due to camera shake.
__________________

Tullio
Tullio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 13, 2010, 10:39 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
mrmacmusic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Central Scotland
Posts: 274
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tullio View Post
Well, if you stopped down to f/8, the shutter speed would have been even slower to compensate for the reduced light (and unless you had forced the ISO to 800, it could go up to 1600 as well, deteriorating the image further). I assume you were not using a tripod, in which case shooting at 400mm (200mm x 2) with shutter speed slower than 1/320, would probably have produce a blurred image due to camera shake.
I was indeed tripod-less, and like I said, my "legacy" technique wasn't exactly top notch that day, and I can't remember whether I forced shutter speed or ISO... terrible, I know... (slaps wrists) Having said that, I think Mr Squirrel looks pretty good!

Forgive me for asking, but when using legacy glass, which mode do you shoot in..? When I first started using FD lenses on my GH1, I went straight to full manual control (i.e. "M" mode), but I've since discovered that the camera is quite happy to use "P" mode, and it actually works quite well. Features like auto/intelligent-ISO and exposure compensation all work as expected despite the lack of aperture information from the lens, with good reliable metering (I tend to use center-weighted most of the time). Can be handy to let the camera hold my hand sometimes
mrmacmusic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 13, 2010, 10:21 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
Tullio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,370
Default

Hum, I'm surprised that you got good results in P mode because P mode means that the camera picks the aperture and shutter combination based on the amount of light. The thing is, with a manual lens, the camera would not be able to understand the aperture in order to calculate the shutter speed. I always shoot in Av mode. I select the aperture and the camera picks the shutter speed. If the aperture is too wide and there's too much light, the shutter speed turns red and blinks indicating that there's too much light and not enough speed. I then stop down until the shutter value turns white and stops blinking. I don't think you get that in P mode with manual lenses. I need to try.

BTW, your squirrel shot is indeed very good with rich colors.
__________________

Tullio
Tullio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 15, 2010, 3:36 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
mrmacmusic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Central Scotland
Posts: 274
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tullio View Post
Hum, I'm surprised that you got good results in P mode because P mode means that the camera picks the aperture and shutter combination based on the amount of light. The thing is, with a manual lens, the camera would not be able to understand the aperture in order to calculate the shutter speed. I always shoot in Av mode. I select the aperture and the camera picks the shutter speed. If the aperture is too wide and there's too much light, the shutter speed turns red and blinks indicating that there's too much light and not enough speed. I then stop down until the shutter value turns white and stops blinking. I don't think you get that in P mode with manual lenses. I need to try.
I wanted to 100% check this before replying hence the delay.....

What I have now confirmed (and you probably have too), is that when using my manual lenses, I can use the GH1 in either P or A mode and get consistent results - program shift (P) and exposure compensation (A) via the control wheel both also work, as does the blinking red shutter speed indicator should 1/4000 not be fast enough! All three available metering modes - evaluative, center-weighted and spot - provide the expected results.

In both P+A modes, Auto-ISO and (not-so-)Intelligent-ISO work as expected - as ever with 'auto' the camera likes to pick 1/30 (which I've always thought too slow) and with 'intelligent' if the camera senses subject (or camera) movement, it raises the sensitivity to give a faster shutter speed.

The only mode that doesn't work with manual lenses is S - the camera obviously can't electronically control the aperture, but doesn't auto adjust the ISO in any way.

Slightly off topic: One feature I would like to see is a minimum shutter speed option in the settings menu. Surely this would be possible with firmware....? (I recall the FZ38 that I briefly owned had this capability).

Quote:
BTW, your squirrel shot is indeed very good with rich colors.
Cheers! Perhaps not my best, but not bad
mrmacmusic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 12, 2010, 2:18 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 312
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DonalDuc View Post
GH1 + Vivitar 70-210/3.5 macro
Hi Donal, I have here a Vivitar 70-210 1:4.5 Macro Focusing 200M, do you think it is the same as yours? I want to know which adapter I should get. Thanks!
sdcs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 12, 2010, 6:26 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Tullio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,370
Default

The adapter will depend on the mount of the lens. You must know what camera brand/model the lens is for (i.e. Pentax PK or Canon FD,...) in order to determine the adapter needed.
__________________

Tullio
Tullio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 10, 2012, 10:41 PM   #19
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1
Default

Glad to have found this page!

Stumbled upon my fathers old Canon AE-1P as well as this lens. I'm soon buying a Canon DSLR and was wondering if anyone had made use of these lenses. Looks like I will be buying and adapter to make use of these!

Amazing photos!
listerineman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 11, 2012, 8:43 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 294
Default

I have always tried to use the Aperture and Manual modes with slr lenses as Panasonic suggests. When I accidentally have used P mode, I found it is not the same. There is an inconsistency to the P mode vs: the A mode. It's like there is a variable outside your control.

It's acts a little like the "gain up' feature where you hardly notice until you go over the limit and suddenly it's dark.

Shutter speed mode will also work, but it is similar to Manual. You have to "chase" the EV. I've mistaken it for Manual mode until I've made a few adjustments.

If you use extension tubes, where it's necessary to open up to pre-focus, stop down and then make an adjustment, it can be baffling.

I've struggled for hours on a couple occassions, before I realized I was using P rather than A with slr primes.

When I pull the camera from my Slingshot bag, I have a habit of bumping the mode dial on the G1. That's how I get it stuck in the wrong mode.
BBbuilder467 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 9:49 PM.