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Old May 30, 2007, 1:51 AM   #1
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well here's the story!! i have the chance to buy a k1000 with 7 lens for a ridiculously low price

now the thing is i don't know anything at all about lens, it sounds like some alien language when you guys talk about them( i don't even know what a prime or a fast lens is :?).

so my question is what do i look for when i go look at these things? do they even work on my camera ( k100D) ?

thanks
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Old May 30, 2007, 3:18 AM   #2
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Any lens that fits on that K1000 has a mount called K-mount.

All K-mount lenses will fit on your Pentax Digital SLR

look here: http://www.pentaximaging.com/product...lity_chart.jsp

Depending on which type the lens is, some features will be unavailable.

Autofocus lenses will work with all functions, no problems here.

A-lenses (these are manual focus lenses with an 'A'-position on the aperture ring) will work with all exposure modes, but only in MF (manual focus) mode.

M-lenses ( lenses in K-mount, but without an 'A'-position on the aperture ring) will also mount, but will only work in 1 mode, being the M (manual) mode. (and with manual focus only of course)
However, you can get automatic exposure with these by selecting the aperture on the lens, and pressing the AE-L button.

Then there are M42 (screw mount) lenses, that require an extra adapter before they can be used. When you have the adapter, you can use the lens in Av and M mode, though the metering will be not 100% full-proof. (occasional under/overexposure)


Someone should write a webpage about this...this has been asked so many times...I think I'll do that one of these days

Hope I could help.

Tom
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Old May 30, 2007, 4:11 AM   #3
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Hi Julianne,

Edit: -- Tom already posted while I was writing this. . .

There's no quick answer, but if the lenses work with the K1000, they will work in some fashion with the K100D.

The biggest potential problem are lenses with a Ricoh mount. These are essentially the same as the Pentax K mount, but have an extra pin which can allow the lens to get stuck on any of the Pentax digital SLR bodies. I'd say stay away from any lens that says anything about Ricoh on it, or has PK/R stamped or engraved anywhere. If one does get stuck, it's not the end of the world, but it's a significant hassle, and you don't want to go there.

The other thing that you need to do is check each lens for condition
-- do the focusing ring and aperture ring rotate smoothly
-- if there's an "A" position on the aperture ring, does it lock in place there if you push the little button on the ring
-- with the aperture ring set to the highest number, do the aperture blades move with a "snap" when you push the little spring-loaded lever on the back of the lens to one side and then let it go. if the action is sluggish, then be prepared to pay a tech to clean and lubricate the lens (say @ $75), or pass on it.
-- when the aperture blades close down, is the opening pretty symmetrical
-- is the glass clear and scratch free and are the coatings intact (you should see a yellowish, bluish, purplish reflection when to look at the lens surface at an angle) it should look the same across the face of the glass.
-- are there any dents in the barrel of the lens, or where filters would screw in at the front of the lens.

If you're getting the lenses super cheap, you can accept less than perfection. Your call.

I assume that you have the kit lens. This is an example of a DA series lens. If you look at the base of the lens (where it mounts to the camera body, you'll notice a series of electical contacts along one side. DA, FA, D FA, F, FAJ, and A series lenses all have these contacts, but not always the same number of them. All these series lenses will work with all the auto exposure modes just like your kit lens. All but the FAJ and DA lenses have aperture rings that must be set to the "A" position to meter with the lens wide open like your kit lens. All but the A series lenses are also auto focusing. One suggestion that I might offer is that you choose from these series of lenses only. These letter designations only apply to Pentax branded lenses, but many third party lens makers also made lenses that conformed to each of these standards, and usually work as well, but might differ in optical or build quality.

The M and K series lenses are manual focus, do not have the contacts, and there is no "A" position on the aperture ring. You can use these lenses, but you have to set the "using aperture ring" setting in the Custom Menu to "permitted", and push the AEL button to stop down the lens, meter the exposure, and lock it before tripping the shutter.

M42 lenses are screw mount lenses that worked with the oldest of the Pentax SLRs like the Spotmatic. They can be used with the Pentax DSLRs with an appropriate adapter, and are fully manual. The AEL button will not stop this type of lens down for metering, so it must be manually stopped down before hand, or shot wide open.

My suggestion would be to take a look at these lenses, write everything down that's written on each of them, and come back to the forum and list them out. I'm sure that any number of members here will be glad to offer opinions about which ones to get and what you might want to avoid, possibly with some pricing suggestions. I think that everyone here would like to see you get a good deal, and would honestly evaluate the lenses for your potential use.

BTW, a "fast" lens is one that has a wide maximum aperture (f-stop). Since the lower the number, the wider the opening, f1.2 (or 1:1.2) would be about the fastest, with f2.8 (or 1:2.8 ) usually considered fast. A prime is a lens with one focal length (50mm) only as opposed to a "zoom" which will list a range of focal lengths (70-200mm), and possibly a range of maximum apertures (f4-5.6).

I've probably confused you with this long post -- feel free to ask more questions. . . and remember that there aren't any dumb questions. . . really. Everyone was in your position at one time. . .

Scott


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Old May 30, 2007, 9:28 AM   #4
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snostorm wrote:
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-- feel free to ask more questions. . . and remember that there aren't any dumb questions. . . really.
Scott

sure there are scott.. it's the one you don't ask..

roy
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Old May 30, 2007, 11:26 AM   #5
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actually not confused at all thank you very much for both your replies!! it was well written even the the language issues i still understood it

i was planing on giving you the information on the lens as soon as i know it. the lady that owns them does not know ( she just always used the same lens herself)the camera and lenswere giving to her by her wedding photographer dauther after she when digital with Nikon. she now just got herself a digital P&S that she is very happy with and want to sell the Pentax as a package.( camera, lens and flash )

to be honest i did not even consider it till she told me the price 150$ Canadian. i am VERY happy with my 2 kit lens. but this seem like an opportunity that i may regret so i am looking into it . she said she would e-mail me the info on the lens in a couple of days since i cannot go see them for a couple of weeks.

thank you for your help i will let you know as soon as i have the info.

btw what is a marco ?? is it just used to photograph small stuff cause there is one in that package that was the only thing she was sure of
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Old May 30, 2007, 11:31 AM   #6
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TDN wrote:
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Someone should write a webpage about this...this has been asked so many times...I think I'll do that one of these days

Hope I could help.

Tom
i think you should !!! i then to look for yourposts because i always understand what you are talking about. well you and a few others seem to not get too technical and go over a newbie's head
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Old May 30, 2007, 12:46 PM   #7
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julianne wrote:
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btw what is a marco ?? is it just used to photograph small stuff cause there is one in that package that was the only thing she was sure of
Hi Julianne,

Macro used to mean capturing an image on the film that was the same size or larger than the actual subject. That would be a 1:1 or 1.5:1 ratio. More recently, lens manufacturers have used the term for marketing, and 1:2 or 1:3 (the image captured is 1/2 or 1/3 actual life-size) lenses are said to be "macros". They are, to old school photographers, just close focusing lenses. or lenses with a certain setting that allows closer than normal focusing.

One thing that a dedicated macro lens does do is focus continuously from the 1:1 point all the way out to infinity, and it's specifically designed to give you a very flat field of focus (everything from corner to corner should be sharp and infocus -- it it's the same distance from the lens)

Most of these lenses, from any mfg are at least pretty good, and the best ones are very expensive.

Scott
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Old May 30, 2007, 1:10 PM   #8
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julianne wrote:
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i think you should !!! i then to look for yourposts because i always understand what you are talking about. well you and a few others seem to not get too technical and go over a newbie's head
Don't worry about being new too all this, a year ago I was in exactly the same situation. Didn't even know what aperture and DOF (depth of field) and all that stuff were!:?

If you're interested in a beginner's course to all that photographic tech-stuff: check out the free lessons here:

http://www.morguefile.com/archive/classroom.php

She explains everything very clearly, and gives some great tips too.


As for the lenses, if they came from a professional (the wedding photographer), there's a good chance there might be some really good lenses in there!

here are a few links that are useful to have bookmarked:

http://kmp.bdimitrov.de/
http://stans-photography.info/
http://www.mflenses.com/


Like scott said, don't hesitate to ask any questions, it's the best way to learn

Tom
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Old Jun 14, 2007, 12:14 AM   #9
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robar wrote:
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snostorm wrote:
Quote:
-- feel free to ask more questions. . . and remember that there aren't any dumb questions. . . really.
Scott

sure there are scott.. it's the one you don't ask..

roy
Roy you didn't finsh that up ...it's the one you don't ask..But should have.

They are all right you know..we were all once newbies..and in my case after a whole lot of years am still one to a certain extent. I had some very nice folks assist me in my hobby and am forever grateful to them for that. Here everyone will help if only asked.

Dawg
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Old Jun 14, 2007, 12:52 AM   #10
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TDN wrote:
Quote:
julianne wrote:Don't worry about being new too all this, a year ago I was in exactly the same situation. Didn't even know what aperture and DOF (depth of field) and all that stuff were!:?

If you're interested in a beginner's course to all that photographic tech-stuff: check out the free lessons here:

http://www.morguefile.com/archive/classroom.php

She explains everything very clearly, and gives some great tips too.


As for the lenses, if they came from a professional (the wedding photographer), there's a good chance there might be some really good lenses in there!

here are a few links that are useful to have bookmarked:

http://kmp.bdimitrov.de/
http://stans-photography.info/
http://www.mflenses.com/


Like scott said, don't hesitate to ask any questions, it's the best way to learn

Tom
thank you those are great !!!! i had seen some of them but not all thanks
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