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Old Jun 25, 2007, 7:48 AM   #1
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I am the happy owner of a new Pentax K10D camera. Now I am cogitating my lens supply to see what I really have, and perhaps I will trade up to something better if you readers can give me the information about what I have now.

I have three oldmanual-focus pentax lenses from my film-camera days.One SMC Pentax 1: 1.4/50 SN 1171819 Asahi Optical Co.; One SMC Pentax 1: 3.5/28 SN 5161623 Asahi Optical Co.; and one SMC Pentax Zoom 1: 4.5/85-210 SN 5055909 Asahi Optical Co.

I have the 18/55 kit lens which came new with the camera.

I have a49mm Vivitar 28mm 1: 2.8 MC Wide Angle SN 28303380.

I bought the old lenses new, have kept Hoya UV filters on them mostly for protection, and they seem to be in perfect working order.

The Zoom lens has a speck of dust on an inside lens. Is that likely to degrade the quality of its images? Is there any reasonable way for me to get the dust out?

Would I materially improve my image quality by buying some different lenses, or in your opinion will what I have be suitable for general photographic work?

I would like to do some close-ups of nature objects, bugs, bees, flowers, etc, and I would like to have suggestions about equipment that will allow me to do that.

Thanks in advance,

Old Engineer
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Old Jun 25, 2007, 5:21 PM   #2
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The K10D is a very nice camera and Pentax make great lenses.
However, the newer lenses made today include improvments in design, lens coatings, materials AND auto-focus.

Your old lenses are probably of very little value today, so I would keep them and see how they work with the new body.

Give it some time and then decide what you really need and go look at the newer lenses. You can also compare the ease of use of the new kit lens with those older manual lenses in helping you make a decision.
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Old Jun 25, 2007, 9:19 PM   #3
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I am going to disagree, at least to an extent, with amazingthailand. Those old lenses have a lot to offer that you will not find on modern lenses, including quality construction and well damped manual focus. If you were happy with them on film, odds are good you will be happy with them on your K10. If you check out ebay, you will see that the high quality Pentax manual focus lenses are selling for surprising prices.

The 50mm f1.4 and 1.7 lenses in both manual focus and auto focus are very well regarded. I don't have any experience or knowledge of the other lenses but I am sure that someone else here will chime in.

If these are K or M versions (no electronic connections) you will have to use manual mode and remember to tell the camera to meter whenever light conditions change (I have a K100, I think the K10 had a dedicated button for this). If it is an A version you can use the more advanced modes like Av and the camera will take care of the metering for you.

I am new to photography and started out with a K100 last year. Most of the lenses I have purchased have been manual focus. I do agree with amazing's conclusion: try them all out and then decide what you need from there.

If you have an interest in macro photography my suggestion would be to skip the extension tubes, diopters, and reversing rings and just go straight to a good macro lens in the 90-105mm range. Tamron, Sigma, and Pentax all make good AF macro lenses and manual focus versions appear regularly on ebay as well.

Tim
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Old Jun 25, 2007, 9:28 PM   #4
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The Kit Lens and a 70-300mm autofocus will take care of most of your needs. But I have those and use my manual focus lenses more than them. If I know there is going to be a bunch action..Grandkids or diving pelicans then I use the autofocus. For the rest I really prefer the manual focus lens.



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Old Jun 25, 2007, 9:34 PM   #5
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amazingthailand wrote:
Quote:
Your old lenses are probably of very little value today,
no offense meant but TOTAL BSh!!

the vivitar you list is made by komine and is probably an outstanding lens.. the pentax primes you list have very high regards. the zoom i know nothing about.. all of my older pentax lenses are great.

roy
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Old Jun 25, 2007, 10:04 PM   #6
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As are mine Roy. The 200mm, 135mm, 50mm, 35mm, and 55mm Pentax vintage lens will shoot as good or better photos as the new ones. Good optics is good optics. My Vivitar series 1 75-210 is as good as any made today and only requires manually setting things which I prefer anyway.

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Old Jun 26, 2007, 1:15 AM   #7
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amazingthailand wrote:
Quote:
The K10D is a very nice camera and Pentax make great lenses.
However, the newer lenses made today include improvments in design, lens coatings, materials AND auto-focus.

Your old lenses are probably of very little value today, so I would keep them and see how they work with the new body.

Give it some time and then decide what you really need and go look at the newer lenses. You can also compare the ease of use of the new kit lens with those older manual lenses in helping you make a decision.
Please ignore that reply.
Either amazingthailand is trying to get you to sell your lenses to him, or he's never used an old Pentax prime before...

The 50mm f/1.4 lens you have is a wonderful lens! Sure, it's manual focus, but it has an optical quality you'd have to pay a fortune for in a modern lens.
Definitly keep this one. (On ebay these go up to 70 or 80$...or more nowadays)

The 28mm f/3.5 will be good too. Pentax does have a faster f/2.8 version, but optically, these 2 won't differ much. Very high quality aswell. (ebay: 60-70$ I think)

I have no idea about the zoom, but since it's made in a period where Pentax did not make any bad lenses, I'd guess it's worth to keep aswell, at least until you get an alternative telelens.


The vivitar is a matter of being lucky. Vivitar made some great lenses, but they also made some absolute garbage...I'd say try it out (ebay: approx. 20-30$)


Anyway, the old Pentax glass is very known for it's outstanding quality, and is definitly worth something. I put the average price on ebay nowadays next to the lenses I know of...

If you're curious about Pentax mounts and how to use these on your DSLR, chekc this page: http://pentaxdigital.tdn9.be/?page_id=4

You can look up your lenses here.: Dimitrov and Stan's Pentax Photography. Both offer specifics on each of the Pentax lenses.

Enjoy your new camera!

Tom
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Old Jun 26, 2007, 1:20 AM   #8
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OOPS double post
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Old Jun 26, 2007, 1:26 AM   #9
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amazingthailand wrote:
Quote:
Your old lenses are probably of very little value today, so I would keep them and see how they work with the new body.
You must not have looked at EBay lately, with the blossoming popularity of the K100 & 10D, old Pentax glass is dwindling fast and prices are climbing as fast.

I'd agree though keep them, though the two 28mm are pretty redundant, though a 1/2 stop slower the 3.5 Pentax likely the better lens, so maybe sell the Vivitar...


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Old Jun 26, 2007, 10:22 PM   #10
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As you can see, there are a number of us that like old glass, so don't dismiss what you have just because it might be 20 or more years old.

I think you previously mentioned (in another thread)that your SMC 50mm 1.4 lens was an M lens. I have both the 1.4 and the 1.7, and findmine are the same from f2 on, but that the 1.4 is too soft wide open for my taste. I've read where they changed the 1.4 lens when they came out either with the A or FA version - those 1.4 lenses are better wide open, so if yours is newer, it might be better than mine.

Since Roy identified your Vivitar 2.8 as a Komine, it could be the "keeper" of your two 28 mm lenses. It's faster and Komine made excellent lenses.

I don't know anything about the zoom you had. I've had two old Pentax zoom lenses - the SMC F 70-210 lens I had was super-sharp and my favorite lens until it broke. I also have an SMCM24-50 that had been my father's. It might have been a kit lens, I don't know, but it is a lousy lens, very soft. So I'd try your zoom and see what you think of the results. Just because it's a Pentax lens might or might not mean it's any good.

The kit lens is whatI use for wide angle pictures and I'm quite happy with it.

I wouldn't worry about the speck of dust on the inside of the zoom. While it's possible it might affect the image quality, I wouldn't be surprised if it made no difference at all. You should see some pictures Roy has taken with an A*300 lens that has a pretty scratched up front element. As far as getting it out - I looked into getting a Kiron lens I have fixed (oil on the aperture blades) and it would cost about $75. That's about $50 more than the lens is worth in good working condition, so I wouldn't mess with it.

I'd keep the lenses you have and start playing with them. Decide what you want to take that they can or can't do and then go from there.

If you want to get into macro pictures (bugs, bees, flowers) then ultimately you'd probably want to get a macro lens. It partly depends on your budget at the moment - extension tubes work well, dioper filters can be OK but you are introducing more glass so could potentially introduce distortion, I've never played with reversing rings but have seen some awesome pictures posted using them. I ended up buying the very inexpensive Phoenix 100mm 3.5. It has very good optics but the build quality isn't the greatest. On the other hand, it didn't cost much more than a set of new auto extension tubes. There are a number of threads where we've talked about options for macro photos.
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