Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Pentax Lenses

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Oct 2, 2007, 12:30 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
a200user's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Western New York
Posts: 942
Default

I have K100D, DA18-55mm Kit lensand DA50-200mm lens. I have determined that I do not have the steadiest hands in the world. I can do Ok up to about 150mm, then I'm hit and miss, especially if the subject is small in the view finder, even with SR on. If I can get close enough to my subject (birds) I can get sharp focus, however those little goldfinches are hard to get close to. I'm about to purchase a Sigma 70-300mm f4-5.6 APO DG, but I'm wondering if I'll need to use a tripod/monopod to get a high percentage of sharpimages at 300mm, even when using SR?
a200user is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Oct 2, 2007, 3:51 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
robar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: D/FW area Texas
Posts: 7,590
Default

probably if you are just a little worse than me. i don't have SR on the DS tho. i base this on the fact you stated as having blur with SR at 200mm. it just gets worse at 300mm. a mono will help but it has technique as well to get the most from it.. you don't just set it down straight on the ground. you use it to make a tripod out of it and your body. i like using mine either to my left and a foot+ behind me or even between my legs. use it also titled in front of you and lean into it. (ck your friction settings first). if you can get an elbow on a tree or something then you're really set..
oh?? those tiny little birds??? all they do is PMO!! they're never still long enough...

roy
robar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 2, 2007, 11:17 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,056
Default

I wasn't reliable at 200mm when I had the DS - the first thing I noticed when I bought the K100 was how much difference SR made - I became reliable at 200mm and had enough courage to buy a 300mm lens that I love dearly, and can handhold reliably at realistic shutter speeds (not 1/125 sec.). I'm not sure I would have been able to do the same thing if I weren't reasonably steady with SR at 200mm, but you might be surprised (the interesting thing is that I just reviewed a couple of pictures I took today - two of them were of the same humorous topic, both were sharp, both taken with the A*300 and both had shutter speeds of 1/180 sec. Guess I'm improving my stance, something I have been working on since I got the tennis elbow). A monopod or a tripod really is the way to go with a long lens, if you can - somehow I never practice what I preach when it comes to this.

Your post also brings up a question - are you seeing camera shake or are you seeing missed focus (you mention that you get better when you are closer to your subject)? I get a certain number of shots where the camera focused on something unintended - another thing to think about. It's a whole lot easier to see the focus if you are using a sharp lens (my particular DA 50-200 isn't that sharp so I find it harder to tell than either the Viv macro or the A300).
mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 3, 2007, 12:43 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
philneast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Hobart Tasmania
Posts: 489
Default

I am lost without my tripod on anything over 200mm.

For 300 to 400 it is absolutely essential.


Of course as you get to the long focal lengths the depth of field can get small and, as previously mentioned, the subject may get fuzzy as it is out of focus.

Also the longer lenses get heavy on along shoot, so the monopod helps hold the camera as well as providing shake reduction.

For action shots the monopod is more maneuverable than its three legged cousin.


Phil
philneast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 3, 2007, 1:22 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Tumbleweed, Arizona
Posts: 1,381
Default

A couple of months ago, I was able to pickup a 75-300 and have found like you, up to 200 I am pretty good. At 300 there is more motion at times than what I would like. I have a tripod, that I should start using, but its a pain. Your idea of a monopod I think would be excellent.

I have found the shake reduction on the K100 to be (for me) very good - it is always on. I believe that it has helped a lot. I have a canon p&s with out any stablization and there are a number of shots that I am really amazed that did not turn out - just because of the shaking.

35+ years ago when I was in the Navy, I was tasked with photographing ships underway at sea - expecially the ones I just recorded (radar signals). The ship was never steady. I started using a bath towel on the top of the big eyes (the ship's large binoculars that sit on a hydraulic column to dampen the motion). That worked pretty well, however the best thing that I found was someone's sholder to rest the lens on - worked every time. An antenna on a ship is usually pretty large, but at 1,000 yards (half mile) it isn't that large.
interested_observer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 3, 2007, 9:22 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
a200user's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Western New York
Posts: 942
Default

mtngal wrote:
Quote:
Your post also brings up a question - are you seeing camera shake or are you seeing missed focus (you mention that you get better when you are closer to your subject)? I get a certain number of shots where the camera focused on something unintended - another thing to think about.
Thelongest lens I have is the DA50-200. But to answer your question I think it's an issue of missed focus. If the subject is large, and I'm not that steady during the pre-focus my subject is still in the "cross hairs". However, if the subject is small, and there is a busy background, I'm never sure what the focus was confirmed on until I review the shot.Something in the frame is usually in focus, but not always what Ihad intended. I'd say yes, it's more of an issue of missed focus, due to my unsteady hands and focus confirming on something other than the subject. When I use my tripod it solves the problem.My problem is that my tripod is a beast that I wouldn't hike with, so an investment in a monopod along with a longer lens sounds like the way to go. Thanks all for your help. I think I got this one well enough, but I was able to get real close and have him large in the frame.
Attached Images
 
a200user is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 3, 2007, 11:06 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,056
Default

Nothing wrong with this one! I do understand what you are saying about not seeing the focus when objects are small, especially with the DA50-200. I think you'll find that having 300mm will help because your subject will be larger. However, my 300mm lens is the A*300, which is a fairly awkward lens to use - its pretty heavy and all of the weight is on the front of the lens. This makes it harder for me to hold it steady, and a little motion is magnified at that focal length. However, it's such a sharp lens, I can usually tell when it is in focus on the subject I want, and it's a manual focus lens.

I won't carry a tripod hiking, either - I don't have one that is light enough and I'm just not interested in messing with one. I do use a monopod quite often - mine came from REI and is a walking stick/trekking pole with a screw on the top for a camera mount. It's held up well doing double duty. You might want to look into something like that if you hike a lot.
mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 4, 2007, 6:12 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
philneast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Hobart Tasmania
Posts: 489
Default

My 400 mm lenses have a tripod collar.

The camera lens combo is balanced so it takes very little effort to hold a monopod in position.

I use the collapsed monopod to carry the camera lens combo around between shooting spots.

I balance it over my shoulder.

Phil


philneast is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 1:29 PM.