Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Pentax Lenses

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jun 7, 2009, 2:11 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Biro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 835
Default Pentax 18-250 Lens/Night MLB Game

A few weeks ago, I started a post in the General Q&A section about which superzoom P&S would be good for a friend of mine to take to games at Major League Baseball parks. The general consensus seemed to be that the 486mm offered by Panasonic's FZ28 would be the minimum that he would need.

Now... I plan to be joining him at one game - a night game - in Philadelphia on July 3. Since he'll already be bringing an FZ28, I was thinking about bringing my K200D (I have already e-mailed the team to make sure they'll let me bring the camera into the park).

Now... my decision to bring in the K200D is also contingent upon my having access to another friend's Pentax 18-250mm lens. Trying this combination at a night MLB game might be an interesting experiment. The 18-250mm range would allow me to get photos of my friends sitting with me, relatively wide-angle shots of the park and maybe some action on the field. Did I mention that we'll have field-level seats just above the visiting team's dugout on the third-base side? That location is one reason I'm willing to try this lens's 383mm maximum zoom.

So... here's my question: f/6.3 at 383mm? Will that be wide/fast enough? Yes, it's a night game but MLB parks are well-lighted - enough for color TV cameras. It feels like or close to daylight in those parks at night. Or am I dreaming?
Biro is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jun 14, 2009, 9:47 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
nhmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Southern New Hampshire
Posts: 5,202
Default

Biro,

With my little experience I would think you'd be okay. I recently went to a Rockies night game. I didn't have a long zoom lens. Only my Sigma 28-80. It was the one lens I own with the best variation of range. I hadn't wanted to take more than one lens. This was taken about 8 p.m. at 80mm f5.6, 1/80 sec, ISO400, +0.7 exposure compensation. It's not a wonderful shot. We were sitting out past 3rd base in row 26. But, maybe it'll help you some.

Patty
Attached Images
 
nhmom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 15, 2009, 9:42 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Biro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 835
Default

Actually Patty, this is helpful. If you can get this at ISO 400 and f/5.6... I'm sure I'd be fine at ISO 800 and f/6.3... or maybe even ISO 1600 (with the decent light in the park) which would allow me to stop down a bit (f/8?) to guarantee sharpness and no vignetting. But, like me, you know you don't want to bring more than one lens into a ball park! Thanks so much!
Biro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 15, 2009, 10:09 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
robar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: D/FW area Texas
Posts: 7,590
Default

you bet it helps. i haven't hadd the k20d for more than 2 weeks but there's really something that stands out.. the noise level of the higher ISOs.. just unbelievable..
__________________
Roy
Passion is in all great searches and is necessary to all creative endeavors. - W. Eugene Smith
http://picasaweb.google.com/roysphoto/?pli=1
robar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 16, 2009, 9:58 AM   #5
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,529
Default

Biro,

You'll always get some shots. A suggestion is - get there early - preferably for batting practice. You'll have freedom to move around and you can get some snapshots of the players up close. You will always be able to get atmosphere shots - you don't need fast shutter speeds for that. For action shots - take them early. Assuming a 7:05 start time you'll have plenty of time to take shots. You should have a decent angle to get shots of left handed batters at the plate and right handed pitchers. Action in the field will be tough because the lens isn't long enough for tight action. But it's still fun to try. NOW, you need a LOT of shutter speed for pitchers and batters - in the neighborhood of 1/2000-1/4000 if you want stop action. Your goal should be nothing less than 1/1000 so you'll likely start the game at ISO 800.
Once you're full on under lights you'll find it too dark to get good action shots. For example at Progressive Field in Cleveland, night settings are around ISO 1000 F2.8 1/500. With your lens you'd be at around 1/100 or so at iso 1000. So get your action shots early, then sit back and enjoy and get atmosphere shots.
JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 16, 2009, 4:32 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Biro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 835
Default

Yup... good advice, John. Sounds like a plan. Thanks a bunch.
Biro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 17, 2009, 10:34 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Western Canada
Posts: 3,076
Default

John G, that is great advice, very practical for the equipment used.
lesmore49 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 17, 2009, 9:45 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
nhmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Southern New Hampshire
Posts: 5,202
Default

John, thanks for the advice. Although, too late for me now. I hadn't even thought of getting to the game early to get some shots. And, we were walking all over Denver for a few hours wasting time before the game.

Anyway, I'll try to remember your tips for next time I can get to a game.

Patty
nhmom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 19, 2009, 1:33 PM   #9
Member
 
h7edge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 45
Default

A Mono-pod might come in handy. 1 that colapses pretty small. Although not nearly as steady as a tripod but is much better than hand holding.
h7edge is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 5:25 AM.