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Old Jun 21, 2009, 11:14 AM   #11
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Good advice by all. I have only one DA lens and plan on staying away from small sensor sized lens from this point on as I am very certain a full frame sensor camera is in the future. Saying that I enjoy most.. collecting older manual lens as they are an inexpensive way to collect lens. Your choice...but the best advice I've seen so far is get good lens as the body will change but the lens continue to give good service long after a camera body has been retired. I have several preset lens from the early 1960's that work nearly as good as the newest lens but in manual mode of course.
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Old Jun 21, 2009, 11:29 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by photographynut View Post
Just got my Pentax K20 about a week ago and still learning. I however had two lens questions. My first is what is a good all around lens for photos one that has a big range from wide to telephoto? I have seen on BH and wonder how good is Bower lenses? They seem low price but know sometimes that low price is not always bad.

I am sure as time with the camera goes on I will have more questions and once I am able to learn everything I can about the K20. I can try to answer others questions as well.

Thanks

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Congratulations on your K20, and welcome to the Pentax community. I suspect you will be "still learning" six months from now and even more. One of the nice things about the K20 is that you can be taking fantastic photos with it while still learning its advanced features as you go along.

I would be leery of the Bower lenses, although I freely admit I don't have any of them. I do have a Bower external flash that I bought as a slave unit for $ 30 or so, and it does what I bought it for well, however, build quality is very, very cheap.

I have thought seriously about the 18-250 for those times I want a really wide range without having to make lens changes, but I can cover the range well with only a couple of lenses....for instance the Sigma 18-50 f/2.8 or the Tamron 28-75 f/2.8 and the Tamron 70-300 f/4.0-5.6.

You don't say if you got the kit lens with your K20. If you did, an affordable solution might be to add either the Tamron 70-300 or the Pentax 55-300.

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Old Jun 21, 2009, 2:49 PM   #13
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I have been in a crabby mood lately (after all, it is the summer solstice), so I guess it is time to don my curmudgeon hat and wade in on a couple of controversial points. The first is that, based on interviews (posted elsewhere) with Hoya management, it is clear that they do not foresee a place for Pentax in the professional segment of the market (and have said so in as many words) - they plan to manufacture only ruggedized advanced amateur or "enthusiast" dslr models suited for outdoor use (and not necessarily studio use where many pros operate), have been introducing only APS-C lenses, and are withholding their forthcoming medium format professional camera from the NA market because they do not see adequate demand for it here. After taking over Minolta, Sony continued only full frame lenses, a clear signal they intended to introduce a full frame model, which they have now done. Pentax would have to significantly expand their relatively miniscule share of the dslr market before they could even consider returning to the pro market which was a money loser for them in the past. They would need much greater sales to be able to support such an expense.

The second is more controversial, and I may be the only one who feels this way, but when AF lenses can be used in the manual mode when desired, I do not understand (except in a few special cases like macros or wide aperture longer teles where no affordable or satisfactory substitutes are available) why people would buy AF cameras and then limit themselves with manual lenses, unless they just like to collect or experiment with them for the fun of it. I have a closet full of them that I never use, left over from film days. Some older lenses can still perform adequately, but lens design has progressed so far in recent years, there are almost certainly superior performers available in newer lenses.

The two points are related, as follows: The only advantage that full frame lenses as a group have over APS-C lenses (some of which might be smaller and lighter), is that on the smaller sensor, the distracting edge effects are lost and the FF lens delivers only images from the sharper more central areas, while the APS-C lenses - because of their smaller image circle - are subject to the reintroduction of these edge effects where they exist. Whether or not with manual lenses that negates the advantage of AF depends on the lenses involved, and the preferences of the photographer. All other things being equal, when the choice is between similarly specified newer AF lenses, I would go with the full frame choice for that reason alone - I do not see that the dream of a full frame Pentax camera should be the principal determining factor in lens purchases. If and when that ever happens (which will not be any time soon), much better lenses will have been designed.

That's what I think.

Last edited by penolta; Jun 21, 2009 at 3:59 PM.
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Old Jun 21, 2009, 5:56 PM   #14
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you know me doc...
i just can't afford the AF lenses..
about all i want is a good wide and an AF 300mm
i'm still buried under the dog house for the k20 purchase..
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Old Jun 21, 2009, 7:14 PM   #15
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you know me doc...
i just can't afford the AF lenses..
about all i want is a good wide and an AF 300mm
i'm still buried under the dog house for the k20 purchase..
There was nothing personal in those remarks - they were not directed at any one person. There is certainly nothing wrong with someone using old manual lenses if they want to or need to. With all the buzz about manual lenses I just don't want new users to get the idea that AF lenses are not suitable for any reason.
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Old Jun 21, 2009, 8:35 PM   #16
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P,
no offense noted..
and the AF offerings from all the brands are pretty good.. just do your research..
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Old Jun 21, 2009, 11:22 PM   #17
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Nothing wrong with AF lens but there is more sense of accomplishment to me to get the photo myself rather than let the Camera and lens do it all. Good results can be had with both. The Feel of a good solid Old School Quality made lens is just something I enjoy,. Sorry if it bothers you though.
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Old Jun 22, 2009, 11:11 AM   #18
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Sorry if it bothers you though.
The whole point was that favoring older full frame lenses over newer APS-C lenses just because Pentax might have a full frame dslr in the works could cause new buyers to avoid buying some good lenses because they might be bad investments for some uncertain future. I don't think this is a particularly well justified course of action.

As for someone choosing to use older lenses - that is just a matter of different strokes for different folks, Dawg - it doesn't "bother" me at all.

Last edited by penolta; Jun 22, 2009 at 11:45 AM.
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Old Jun 22, 2009, 7:54 PM   #19
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The whole point was that favoring older full frame lenses over newer APS-C lenses just because Pentax might have a full frame dslr in the works could cause new buyers to avoid buying some good lenses because they might be bad investments for some uncertain future. I don't think this is a particularly well justified course of action.

As for someone choosing to use older lenses - that is just a matter of different strokes for different folks, Dawg - it doesn't "bother" me at all.
Good to hear that as it was bothering me that I might have bothered you. I own one DA and several full frame full auto lens and no I wouldn't want to prevent them from getting a DA because someday in the future full frame sensors might arrive. But it was just a statement of what I'm doing not a suggestion that all should do it..or at least that was my intention. Most and maybe all the Sigmas are full frame lens...well at least the two I have anyway. My Kit lens would still be used even if..full frame sensors came on the market...I don't plan on getting rid of my K10D ever.
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Old Jun 23, 2009, 2:15 PM   #20
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Most and maybe all the Sigmas are full frame
Actually, only Sigma's DG lenses (and Tamron's Di lenses) are full frame, and are "Optimized for digital". Sigma's newer DC lenses (as well as Tamron's Di II and Tokina's DX lenses) are exclusively digital (for APS-C only). Many Sigma and Tamron digital lenses have replaced full frame models of the same specifications. Tokina (owned by Hoya) now only markets (or at least advertises) lenses under their own name for Canon and Nikon digitals, at least in this country (that should tell somebody something, but I am not sure what).

Last edited by penolta; Jun 25, 2009 at 4:10 PM.
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