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Old Sep 4, 2009, 3:13 PM   #11
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IF by posting it here I haven't jinxed it, I MAY have an opportunity to shoot an indoor reining show, just for my own education. The opportunity depends on me convincing a bunch of other people that they have a different reason for going where the show happens to be. The venue should be better lit than what I imagine most East Coast indoor rinks would be, but it will be larger, too. I think it would be a fair test as I have almost no idea about reining, other than to know they have test patterns to follow (somewhat like dressage in that respect).

Musical rides were just getting popular when I quit riding, so I've never watched a musical freestyle class, only demonstrations. Do you have a set number of specific moves required for a particular class (i.e., 1st level to have a lengthen trot either across the diagonal or on the rail, along with a 20 meter circle at a canter, something like that)? Or are there even classes for lower levels, just higher levels?
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Old Sep 4, 2009, 6:21 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by jelpee View Post
I wanted to weigh on this thread with regards to shooting horse show events. After many years of attempting to shoot these events, I finally gave up and have left it to the hired professional. My problem was specifically in panning and attempting to get a clear horse/rider with a blurred background--and my success ratio was very poor. It finally occurred to me that in addition to panning horizontally to keep the horse & rider motionless, I was completely disregarding the vertical motion of both the horse & rider as they trotted. I haven't figured out a way to pan both horizontally and up-and-down to get a perfectly motionless horse & rider against a blurred background.

I think the pro used a fast lens and a high ISO to freeze everything. Your thoughts about using the 77 mm f/1.8 would suit this purpose very well. Let me know if you have any more success with the panning thing!
As with shooting any other sport, you need a fast shutter speed to capture the action, and a large aperture to blur the background via the shallow depth of field (not via panning.) Since nothing is moving faster than a body part (no ball, bat, racket, etc.), the shutter speed doesn't need to be real fast. But for indoor events, the shutter speed doesn't change, but the lighting definately does, so the aperture and ISO need to increase in order to get proper exposure.
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Old Sep 4, 2009, 6:48 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by mtngal View Post
IF by posting it here I haven't jinxed it, I MAY have an opportunity to shoot an indoor reining show, just for my own education. The opportunity depends on me convincing a bunch of other people that they have a different reason for going where the show happens to be. The venue should be better lit than what I imagine most East Coast indoor rinks would be, but it will be larger, too. I think it would be a fair test as I have almost no idea about reining, other than to know they have test patterns to follow (somewhat like dressage in that respect).

Musical rides were just getting popular when I quit riding, so I've never watched a musical freestyle class, only demonstrations. Do you have a set number of specific moves required for a particular class (i.e., 1st level to have a lengthen trot either across the diagonal or on the rail, along with a 20 meter circle at a canter, something like that)? Or are there even classes for lower levels, just higher levels?
If anybody spends more on horses than Florida, it's California. I have no doubt that there are some glorious indoor equestrian arenas in your area. I've seen Reining here at the Washington International Horse Show a few years ago (back when the Washington International was more of a spectacle than it is now.) I remember it looked like Dressage on Steroids and with the pedal to the metal.

There are Musical Freestyle Classes at Training level up through the FEI Classes to the Olympic competitions. The rides require the same movements as the standard tests for a level, but the rider can choreograph the test so that the movements are performed in time with the music to match the natural rhythm of the horse at the various gaits. In addition to the conventional scores for the individual movements, the ride is also judged on the artistic interpretation. Sometimes it is quite nice to watch, and it requires a considerable effort on the part of the rider and trainer.
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Old Sep 4, 2009, 8:20 PM   #14
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Some time ago, my wife competed as part of a Quadrille to Sousa's The Liberty Bell March. They did well (and it didn't hurt that the judge was a Monty Python fan.)
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Old Sep 7, 2009, 12:39 AM   #15
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The reining show didn't work out. I got there and there was a huge sign that said no cameras or phones. It turns out that was for a different event being held next to the equestrian center, so I could have used a camera. However I was only there a short time and the arena was being used for practice. Hardly anyone was there and I felt a little uncomfortable being the only person in a large arena taking pictures of someone who was training, rather than showing.

There's actually very few indoor rings in SoCal - why be inside when it hardly ever rains? Most of the equestrian centers I've been to have outdoor rings. The only covered arena I know about in L.A. is at the Los Angeles Equestrian Center, and it's open on the sides. The one time I was there shooting the jumper class, the marine layer was in and so it was like being completely indoors.
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