Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Pentax Lenses

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Oct 18, 2009, 5:00 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Western Canada
Posts: 3,076
Default Just bought a new Pentax 10-17 MM fisheye

After much deliberation between a Sigma 10-20, Pentax Fisheye 10-17 and Pentax 12-24 I went ahead and purchased a Pentax 10-17 fisheye. I've used it a bit today and I love it.

It's almost a 2 for 1 lens...wide angle at the higher numbers and fisheye at the lower #'s.

I was a long time follower of the former Editor of Pop Photography, the late Herbert Keppler.

I've probably read his stuff since around the late '60's. Always good advice.

One of his favourite lens were the Pentax fisheyes and after using mine a short time I can see why .

Very versatile, well made (seems mostly aluminum and of course glass), very good assessments and anecdotal reports by actual users. This lens is also very sharp.

I may find that it is the new standard lens for my aging K10D. I have already swapped my 16-45 Pentax lens off the K10D and on to my KM (K2000).

I know it's not advertised as a Macro...but this baby seems to have some moderate Macro capabilities too.

Last edited by lesmore49; Oct 18, 2009 at 5:03 PM.
lesmore49 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Oct 18, 2009, 9:59 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,052
Default

It's a great little lens, and you can get REALLY close to your subject if you want. Amazingly deep DOF, definitely a fun lens to use. It has it's limitations, but if you like fisheyes, its a great choice. Congrats!
mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 18, 2009, 11:42 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Western Canada
Posts: 3,076
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtngal View Post
It's a great little lens, and you can get REALLY close to your subject if you want. Yes, I was taking a pix of a car very close up...still got the whole car in and after I clicked the shutter I cchecked to see how close the lens was...just a couple of inches..I was amazed. Amazingly deep DOF, definitely a fun lens to use. It has it's limitations, but if you like fisheyes, its a great choice. Congrats!
I'm finding you can get some real interesting perspectives doing fisheye portraits...unfortunately after the people (so far, only my family members) see the results ...it's hard to get them to pose again.

I'm also finding that at around 16-17 mm...depending on the angle, I'm getting pretty reasonable wide angle shots too.

Les
lesmore49 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 19, 2009, 10:04 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

Good Morning, Les-

The new lens sounds like a lot of fun. Post some sample photos when you have a chance. Thanks!

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 19, 2009, 12:12 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
snostorm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Chicago Suburb, IL, USA
Posts: 2,770
Default

Hi Les,

Congrats on the 10-17. I have one, and it's really a great little lens. I posted some first impressions and examples of defishing at 10mm when I first got it.

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/pe...-wide-end.html

It's great as a super wide because defished, it's got a 135 FOV, or about the equivalent of a 5mm rectalinear lens. You lose some resolution at the edges and corners, but I normally don't pay much attention to the edges and corners of most pictures, so I'm alright with this. You get some perspective distortion, even when defished, but you'd get this with any ultra wide lens anyway.

One caveat with this lens is that you shouldn't move much while looking through the viewfinder. The perspective is so different and it focuses literally right up to the front element of the lens, and everything looks so much farther away than it is. There is potential danger to both the shooter and the lens. I've found myself almost touching the front lens element to a subject (which you don't want to do, especially with hard objects) since you can't mount a protective filter -- and there are stories about fisheye shooters stepping off cliffs (most commonly at the Grand Canyon) just taking one more step closer to frame a shot. Actually, the most common mistake is including your own feet or your shadow in the shot, but I've found it a good practice to occasionally just drop the camera down and take a quick look around before moving when using this lens.
I shoot long tele most of the time, so the difference in perspective is probably really exaggerated for me though.

One thing you'll notice is that if you can keep the horizon at the center of the frame, the barrel distortion straightens out, even at 10mm.

It's amazing what this lens can do. From only about 10 feet away, you can take a full height shot of a three story building.

I think you'll have fun with this lens. It's pretty small, so I usually find it hard to not include in my bag.

Scott
snostorm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 19, 2009, 11:31 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Western Canada
Posts: 3,076
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
Good Morning, Les-

The new lens sounds like a lot of fun. Post some sample photos when you have a chance. Thanks!

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce


I'm very pleased with it. I was out today at a few different locations. I broke the fisheye lens in with 190 shutter actuations. Very clear and sharp and if I'm careful it seems as if I can get the lens to do a fair impression of a wide angle lens. A two for one.

I would post some pix but I'm computer illiterate. I've tried a number of times on different sites to no avail.

Les
lesmore49 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 19, 2009, 11:43 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Western Canada
Posts: 3,076
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by snostorm View Post
Hi Les,

Congrats on the 10-17. I have one, and it's really a great little lens. I posted some first impressions and examples of defishing at 10mm when I first got it.

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/pe...-wide-end.html

Thanks for the link.

It's great as a super wide because defished, it's got a 135 FOV, or about the equivalent of a 5mm rectalinear lens. You lose some resolution at the edges and corners, but I normally don't pay much attention to the edges and corners of most pictures, so I'm alright with this. You get some perspective distortion, even when defished, but you'd get this with any ultra wide lens anyway.

One caveat with this lens is that you shouldn't move much while looking through the viewfinder. The perspective is so different and it focuses literally right up to the front element of the lens, and everything looks so much farther away than it is. There is potential danger to both the shooter and the lens. I've found myself almost touching the front lens element to a subject (which you don't want to do, especially with hard objects) since you can't mount a protective filter -- and there are stories about fisheye shooters stepping off cliffs (most commonly at the Grand Canyon) just taking one more step closer to frame a shot.I could see doing that...fortunately I have a 'touch of the Vertigo'. I took some pix at our legislative bldg. today and as you say when I was taking pix downward of some very high, spiraling staircases...my fear of heights cut in...I made sure I didn't approach this high location while looking through the viewfinder..the FE really does alter perception ! Actually, the most common mistake is including your own feet or your shadow in the shot, but I've found it a good practice to occasionally just drop the camera down and take a quick look around before moving when using this lens.I got my feet and everybody within any distance around me...boy...the FE really covers a lot of ground, unlike any lens I've used before.
I shoot long tele most of the time, so the difference in perspective is probably really exaggerated for me though.

One thing you'll notice is that if you can keep the horizon at the center of the frame, the barrel distortion straightens out, even at 10mm.I've been following this. I happened to find an old Herbert Keppler column (the Pentax fisheye seemed to be one of the late and lamented, Mr. Keppler's favourite lenses) and he indicated the same.

It's amazing what this lens can do. From only about 10 feet away, you can take a full height shot of a three story building.

I think you'll have fun with this lens. It's pretty small, so I usually find it hard to not include in my bag.You're right, in the short time I've had this lens I've been surprised at the capability and performance of this lens. It can really punch up a photo and the image qiality, colour rendition, etc...is really good.

Scott
I don't think it's for everyone, but I'm surprised what you can do with this unique lens. I have two digital SLR bodies and I think there's a good chance it may become a 'standard' lens. I've already put my 16-45 lens on my KM (K2000) body , replacing the 18-55 kit lens and the 10-17 FE...seems to have found a new home on the end of my K10D.
lesmore49 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 22, 2009, 7:49 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Wingman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Hebron, Kentucky (northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati):KCVG
Posts: 4,322
Default

Great lens with some very nice effects. Two things to watch out for: at 10 mm, make sure your feet are not in the picture; purple fringing is a problem the perimeter of the images, especially when shooting dark subjects against a light background. It is particularly visible on tree branches.
Wingman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 24, 2009, 4:37 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Western Canada
Posts: 3,076
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jelpee View Post
Great lens with some very nice effects. Two things to watch out for: at 10 mm, make sure your feet are not in the picture; Yup...I keep on the constant lookout at 10 mm..I go shooting with a buddy who has a Canon 30D and a new 7D and when we are taking pix of the same subject, I find with the 10-17 I have to ask him to step back a bit behind me...never a problem with my 16-45 lens purple fringing is a problem the perimeter of the images, especially when shooting dark subjects against a light background. It is particularly visible on tree branches.
I noticed the purple flare the first time the other day. I find that generally this lens is really good at controlling flare even when pointed directly at the Sun.
lesmore49 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 27, 2009, 11:23 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Gumnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 1,259
Default

its a great, fun lens, but with a serious side too
i can agree with the feet in the shot warning i have done that
shadows too, fingers when manually focusing, camera bag straps, the list goes on lol
one thing i have found, instead of moving around, is to not even look through the view finder, with the auto focus and depth of field you are almost gauranteed to get the subject in shot
and crop later
i found that any line that goes through the centre comes out straight
i have some shots i took with it on my site
http://www.johndolphin.net/photos/ca....php?cat_id=61
and a mushroom macro
http://www.johndolphin.net/photos/de...?image_id=5315
so close that the lens was casting a shadow on the mushroom and i had to alter my angle
__________________
www.johndolphin.net/photos
Gumnut is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 2:35 PM.