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-   -   100% Crop (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/pentax-samsung-dslr-k-mount-mirrorless-73/100%25-crop-125767/)

fghouse2000 Jul 13, 2007 10:26 AM

I have a somewhat silly question:

I see folk display images at 100% crop. What does that mean and how do I achieve it.
I understand 100% view of an im age in an application like Picassa or CS2.
I have not grasped the concept of this thing you guys call 100% crop.

I wait for wise words from the sages!

Feroz

snostorm Jul 13, 2007 11:19 AM

Hi Feroz,

My understanding of the 100% crop thing is that the crop you choose to post is at the original resolution as taken. In other words, if you normally would resize a full frame pic to 900 x600 by resampling and downsizing for the web to post on the forum, then a 100% crop would be a 900x600 (or smaller) chunk of the original that has not been downsized, and posted as is. The purpose is to show the original resolution and/or details from the shot which might have been destroyed to some extent by the downsizing process.

Scott

bilybianca Jul 13, 2007 1:26 PM

Exactly my interpretation also. See this thread for a couple of examples (at the bottom ofpageone you can see some 100% crops and one downsized full frame picture).

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...=94&page=1

Kjell

Hayward Jul 13, 2007 11:40 PM

Yeah as to this post on this it should really becalled a 100% (res) CLIP. A 100% crop in the normal sense of all other percentages would mean no image at all.

IE a 50% crop would mean roughly half the original image starting point, in the current resolution.

Funny this should have come up on the same day, as I had not seen this thread (had gotten down a ways) before I posted mine.


Corpsy Jul 14, 2007 12:17 AM

Hayward wrote:
Quote:

Yeah as to this post on this it should really becalled a 100% (res) CLIP. A 100% crop in the normal sense of all other percentages would mean no image at all.

IE a 50% crop would mean roughly half the original image starting point, in the current resolution.

Funny this should have come up on the same day, as I had not seen this thread (had gotten down a ways) before I posted mine.

I think the reason people tend not to interpret it that way is because nobody uses the term "crop" in a relative way, it's always an absolute. It's also not a measurement of how much to remove, but rather of how much to keep. So a 4x6 crop isn't an image with 4x6 removed, it's 4x6 remaining.

The 100% is in reference to the resolution of the image, not the amount of cropping. Since the resolution of an image direct from a camera is 100%, "100% crop" refers to a crop of an image at it's original resolution. Perhaps "crop of 100%" would be more grammatically precise, but that seems like splitting hairs.

Hayward Jul 14, 2007 12:36 AM

But again the reason for the confussion.... as crop implies a cutting/trimming reduction of some sort.

100% clip is both definition accurate and no ambiguous confusion.

I know I am not going to change the world... but so much misunderstanding of all sorts goes on for ambiguousness and inaccuracy. :shock:

Of course if res was added as in 100% res crop that would help too... especially to the new comers to the field... who again is rather confused by usual meaning of crop (removiing something) vs this specific, antithetical meaning as really nothing is cropped, just clipped out intact.

Otherwise by the definition of crop and the intutive meaning would mean all or none of the image is there depending which end you put 0 and 100.

And even your examle I would consider 4x6 a resize not a crop per se (except to cut it make it fit those proportions and you would only have to on a 4:3 cam as that is native 3:2).... because again that gets into scaling and sizing. The sensor native recorded image after all 100% is no where near that size, more like a slide or neg.



TDN Jul 14, 2007 1:44 AM

100% crop just means a part from the original image, without resampling, and thus, no loss of detail/sharpness.

They're crops because you only show part of the image. Showing the entire image at 100% would be very impractical in a webbrowser, as it would be too big, and would load too slow.

These are usually only used when you want to test the sharpness of a lens, or a camera, never in a real photographic situation.


Tom


Hayward Jul 14, 2007 2:43 AM

Granted... but where it confuses people first encountering it is that the 100% has nothing to do with crop ratio just resolution..... in fact it could be any crop ratio that was practical to post. Where as in ALL other cases it is about the crop area ratio.

You wouldn't say 80% crop meaning 80% res would you?

Still think CLIP would be a more easily intuitively understood term.

Dal1970 Jul 14, 2007 5:40 AM

Quite right Hayward. As ususal your intellect is way above ours in this and all matters.



However, convention suggests that contactions get used a lot. 100% res crop, becoming a 100% crop. This is the same as "can not" becoming "can't".



When it comes to Jargon and subject specifics, the dictionary largely goes out the window. Ignore the actual word and concentrate on what it is intended to mean.



Darren

fghouse2000 Jul 18, 2007 10:26 PM

Thanks folks for all the input...now I am even more confused. Looks like I am giong to have to do some more digging for me to see the "light"...perhaps play with software to really get a feel for what 100% crop "feels" like!

Feroz


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