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Old Sep 9, 2006, 12:55 PM   #1
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I spent most of yesterday shooting with a monopod - I find I have become too shaky even for that these days. So, it seems I will henceforth only be using a tripod.



Other shots from yesterday here
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Old Sep 9, 2006, 1:22 PM   #2
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And what the h*ck is wrong with this shot then? :?Are you becoming overpretentious:lol:. Whatever you think yourself, I think this is a very good shot!

Kjell
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Old Sep 9, 2006, 1:25 PM   #3
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As soon as they arrive I plan on putting the ball head I have ordered on my monopod. This will give me the same quick release mount on all of my 'pods, a very big convenience.

Ira
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Old Sep 9, 2006, 2:46 PM   #4
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Ira, which ball head are you going with? I followed the tripod thread and have been checking out the dynatrans but at the budget models at 13 lb /6000 kg (?????), the ball head is a marginal deal, when you start adding the heavier older lenses, IMHO.

sheesh, listen to me........... I'm still 2 weeks out from ordering my k100d and I already have a raving LBA and ADA..

At anyrate I have an opportunity to shoot night time high school sports right out of the gate and I figured I might as well learn to "dance" with monopod to take all advantage of getting good nighttime shots. Does that make any sense???\

nlp... excellent capture on the frog. He's a beaut.
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Old Sep 9, 2006, 3:02 PM   #5
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I can understand, tried my old chinon lens and panagor macro convertor today, I swear, 30 years ago I took "out of hand" for what I now seems to need a tripod. I have two, bothvery solid and very, very heavy, a monopod may be the answer.

Richard.


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Old Sep 9, 2006, 3:31 PM   #6
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Same here. I find it harder every day To keep the camera Steady enough To get a good picture. Another Good reason To convince the wife I Need to invest in the K10D :-)
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Old Sep 9, 2006, 3:59 PM   #7
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Hi nlp,

I have a limited perspective about this, so take it for what it's worth. As primarily a birder, I find a monopod quite useful to hold the camera (and especially with a reasonably heavy lens) in the "ready" position for an extended period of time. This would also apply to sports and other situations where there is some action and a significant amount of "down but ready" time.

For example, shooting herons can be frustrating since they stand still a lot, but when they move, it happens fast. With a long tele, getting the subject in the VF quickly can be a problem, so I need to keep my camera "sighted" (at least approximately) for sometimes many minutes at a time. Too many times I've missed shots of a heron plunging down for a fish because I had to give my shoulders a rest (birder's law -- the best shots come when you're the least ready). A monopod allows me to relax a little, holding the camera up at eye level, and does a reasonable job of steadying it when taking the shot (better than just handholding, especially for long distance work).

Too often I've had birds take off while I'm setting up a tripod, and I've even got the drill of setting up a Uni-Loc down to not more than a few seconds, but the monopod is faster by far, I only need to plunk it down, and vertical and horizontal adjustments are almost instantaneous by tilting or revolving the stick at the same time as I'm focusing as opposed to unlocking the head, repositioning the camera, locking the head, then repositioning my left hand to focus. A gymbal head would make using a tripod faster, but for me and my equipment, it's a bit of overkill (both in size/weight and price), I'm thinking.

For macros, monopods are of limited use for me, but still might offer something in the right circumstances. I am, however, leaning towards handheld with a bounced external flash on a bracket (to keep shutter speed up, even with good available light) in my very limited experience with this type of shooting. I'm talking about shooting critters here. For shooting stationary objects, I'll take a tripod any time.

I'd really prefer to handhold just about everything. That's why I'm so excited about getting SR in my next Pentax body, but I'll still be using the monopod and tripod for their ability to hold the camera in the "ready" position for long periods of time.

Of course, YMMV as with everything.

Scott






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Old Sep 9, 2006, 4:15 PM   #8
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Nothing wrong with that shot but plenty with this one and many like it.



It was meant to be showing the good shots not the bad. Sorry.
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Old Sep 9, 2006, 4:35 PM   #9
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A technique I've found helpful with monopods is to use it at an angle rather than straight up. I position it 18 to 24" in front of me and then lean it in to eye level.
A ball head helps.
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Old Sep 9, 2006, 4:49 PM   #10
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thazooo wrote:
Quote:
A technique I've found helpful with monopods is to use it at an angle rather than straight up. I position it 18 to 24" in front of me and then lean it in to eye level.
A ball head helps.
Some idea here, except I tend to position it between my legs, with the foot just behind my heels.



Darren


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