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Old Oct 6, 2006, 8:41 PM   #11
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Here is the image played around with in PSE4. I took in the last shot and adjusted the levels. It looks much more like what I saw with my eyes yesterday. Didn't do a great job around the edges of selecting the dark areas, and need to clone out the wire fence in front. But, was focusing on getting the brightness matched to what I saw. (At least it looksbetter on my monitor.)

Now to figure out how to set the camera so I don't have to do a lot of post work to my images. I've got about 500 shots from vacation a month ago that I still need to fix from when I first got the camera.
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Old Oct 6, 2006, 11:02 PM   #12
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Your idea of playing with different settings is excellent, the best way to get familiar with how your camera operates. I also prefer the pictures from the camera when I don't use the "bright" menu setting (that's default) and I use either program or Av mode (or M if using a manual lens and sometimes at other times). I find my K100D doesn't tend to underexpose as much as the DS I also have. I've also found that there is a difference between converting with Adobe's ACR and converting with PhotoLab.

Just remember, there's only so much a camera's sensor can do. Like film, you are going to find situations where the light/dark difference is more than the digital sensor can handle (your eye can see so much more). That's why someone developed the graduated neutral density filter - the dark part of the filter can keep detail in your light sky but not let the darker trees be underexposed. If you don't have a graduated ND filter, your only choices in that situation is to take 2 pictures, exposing one for the highlights and the other for the shadows and put them together using software (there are a couple of othersoftware tricks, like levels, that can do similar things). Or forgetting one or the other - letting the highlights get blown out or putting the dark part in shadow without detail. At least with digital, you can take an immediate look and make adjustments right there. I always hated getting my pictures back and finding unexpected (normally bad) results.
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Old Oct 7, 2006, 6:10 AM   #13
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mtngal wrote:
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Your idea of playing with different settings is excellent, the best way to get familiar with how your camera operates. I also prefer the pictures from the camera when I don't use the "bright" menu setting (that's default) and I use either program or Av mode (or M if using a manual lens and sometimes at other times). I find my K100D doesn't tend to underexpose as much as the DS I also have. I've also found that there is a difference between converting with Adobe's ACR and converting with PhotoLab.

Just remember, there's only so much a camera's sensor can do. Like film, you are going to find situations where the light/dark difference is more than the digital sensor can handle (your eye can see so much more). That's why someone developed the graduated neutral density filter - the dark part of the filter can keep detail in your light sky but not let the darker trees be underexposed. If you don't have a graduated ND filter, your only choices in that situation is to take 2 pictures, exposing one for the highlights and the other for the shadows and put them together using software (there are a couple of othersoftware tricks, like levels, that can do similar things). Or forgetting one or the other - letting the highlights get blown out or putting the dark part in shadow without detail. At least with digital, you can take an immediate look and make adjustments right there. I always hated getting my pictures back and finding unexpected (normally bad) results.
I believe I do have the camera set for the bright menu setting right now. I'll try the other setting and see if it makes a difference. I hadn't installed any of the Pentax software as I've only done the jpg's and use WE to do it. I'm assuming you have CS2 then for ACR. I believe PSE5 is supposed to support RAW, but haven't updated from 4 yet.

I'll check into the filteryou mentioned. I need to get a filter for the new lens anyway, just as protection. Or, be switching them back and forth.

I am definitely loving knowing instantly if the photo is coming out okay or washed out or what. Plus, my husband doesn't balk at me taking extra shots so I know one will be right. The film developing costs used to bug him.

Thanks for the info.
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