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Old Oct 5, 2006, 11:31 PM   #1
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I have been playing around with the settings on my camera to figure out if I need to set the EV compensation different than 0.0. A lot of my shots are a lot darker than they should be. Whether taken in AutoPict, P or M.

I took a bunch of shots at different settings today, assuming when I got them uploaded I could look at the properties and determine if there was a particular setting that was coming out better. But, all the photos are showing Exposure Compensation as 0 step.

Is there some way to tell what step the photos were taken at? I'm right clicking on the photo and going into properties, then summary. I'm using the K100D with the kit lens 18-55mm.

Thanks for any input.
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Old Oct 6, 2006, 12:06 AM   #2
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The EV isn't a unique attribute of it's own, rather it's a level of brightness your camera is aiming for by adjusting shutter speed and aperture. In all modes but manual, you can adjust the EV (on my DS, I hold down the little button near the shutter release while turning the wheel). In manual mode EV doesn't apply, because you're in control of both shutter speed and aperture, although the camera will tell you what EV value corresponds to your choice of shutter speed and aperture.

I also find EV = 0.0 to be too dark. Try +0.7 or +0.5.

When you say you took a bunch of shots at different settings, what do you mean exactly? Because, if you keep the EV the same, then changing the aperture (if in Av mode) or the shutter speed (if in Tv mode) won't affect the final exposure, since you're leaving the other unset variable to the discretion of the camera.
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Old Oct 6, 2006, 7:34 AM   #3
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Thank you, pwithem.

So, I'm not quite sure I understand. I was in manual mode. I had the f stop set for 5.6. I then started moving the EV setting to zero to set the shutter speed. (At least that's the way I was taught in my class a few years ago to do it. Or set shutter speed and adjust to set the f stop.) As the shutter speed changed, the EV number rises or lowers and stays that way on the screen.

So, the following three photos were taken at EV of 2.0 (I think), then 1.0 and .5 Looking at the settings I see that the shutter speed changed from 1/60, to 1/125 to 1/180 (I must have the EV's wrong above to make these shutter speeds.)

I'm not positive on the EV settings and wanted to know what I should be setting the camera at to get the best image. But, all three show 0.0 in the summary page.

The camera is still fairly new to me and I'm trying to learn all the settings. I thought I had read somewhere I could make it always shoot at a certain EV setting, but can't find it now.

So, you are saying if I'm in AV or TV mode, it would record the EV for me in the summary? I'm just trying to figure out what I need to set at to not have to adjust in PSE4 every time.

Thanks, Patty


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Old Oct 6, 2006, 7:35 AM   #4
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2nd image at I think 1.0 EV.
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Old Oct 6, 2006, 7:35 AM   #5
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3rd image at I think 0.5 EV.
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Old Oct 6, 2006, 9:34 AM   #6
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From my amateurish point of view I would have just took the 0EV one. You have a huge block of bright sky thats going to disappear into a white blob if you "properly" expose the trees. Too much DR. Post processing a RAW file is the best option here I think. As a minor, and possibly, worthless example, this is your .5 exposure w/ a contrast adjustment (personally all dslr's need this but that could just be me). As a strictly RAW shooter, I certainly cannot advise on the best way to get good jpgs (someday I'll tell you about my "why buy a Polaroid theory" ) but I'd start w/ boosting the contrast slider.

Anyways, the screen capture shows what a "histogram stretch" can do. Please note in the original (solid grey shaded area) you had one lump in the lower left and one spikey lump in the far,far, right and almost nothing in-between. Thecontrastenhancement destroyed what little was left of the blue sky, and that part could be preserved by a lot of PP but..... more work. Do you have this image as a 0 EV? I'd be curious to see how much sky is there.......


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3rd image at I think 0.5 EV.
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Old Oct 6, 2006, 11:05 AM   #7
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Quote:
So, I'm not quite sure I understand. I was in manual mode. I had the f stop set for 5.6. I then started moving the EV setting to zero to set the shutter speed. (At least that's the way I was taught in my class a few years ago to do it. Or set shutter speed and adjust to set the f stop.) As the shutter speed changed, the EV number rises or lowers and stays that way on the screen.
This sounds like normal operation for working in manual mode. By the way, just to be clear, "f stop" = aperture, as you've used it above.

Quote:
So, the following three photos were taken at EV of 2.0 (I think), then 1.0 and .5 Looking at the settings I see that the shutter speed changed from 1/60, to 1/125 to 1/180 (I must have the EV's wrong above to make these shutter speeds.)
Those shutter speeds sound appropriate. EV = 2.0 represents a bright exposure. If you keep the aperture the same at 5.6, then the only way get less bright pictures is to use a faster shutter speed so less light reaches the sensor. 1/180 seconds is shorter than 1/60 seconds, so it makes sense that EV = 0.5 corresponds to 1/180 s shutter speed.


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I'm not positive on the EV settings and wanted to know what I should be setting the camera at to get the best image. But, all three show 0.0 in the summary page.
Trial, error, and general familiarity with your camera and lenses will be the best guidance toward getting the best images. As I mentioned before, I have to use EV = 0.7 to get most of my shots properly exposed (see below about EV).

Quote:
The camera is still fairly new to me and I'm trying to learn all the settings. I thought I had read somewhere I could make it always shoot at a certain EV setting, but can't find it now.
Check out this tutorial. http://web.canon.jp/Imaging/enjoydslr/index.html
It refers to Canon cameras, but it applies universally.


Quote:
So, you are saying if I'm in AV or TV mode, it would record the EV for me in the summary? I'm just trying to figure out what I need to set at to not have to adjust in PSE4 every time.
In manual mode, I'm not sure if it records the EV, since it's not an explicit setting while shooting in manual. In Av, Tv, and P modes, you can tell the camera exactly what EV you want the camera to aim for, and it will be recorded for each picture. Av (Aperture Value) let's you specify the aperture while the camera chooses the shutter to meet the EV goal you have set. Tv (Time Value) let's you specify shutter speed while the camera chooses the aperture to meet the EV you have set. In P (Program) mode, all you do is set the desired EV, and the camera chooses both shutter and aperture values. P mode can make things simple, but you lose a bit of control of your shot in the process.

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Old Oct 6, 2006, 8:49 PM   #8
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oreo57 wrote:
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From my amateurish point of view I would have just took the 0EV one. You have a huge block of bright sky thats going to disappear into a white blob if you "properly" expose the trees. Too much DR. Post processing a RAW file is the best option here I think. As a minor, and possibly, worthless example, this is your .5 exposure w/ a contrast adjustment (personally all dslr's need this but that could just be me). As a strictly RAW shooter, I certainly cannot advise on the best way to get good jpgs (someday I'll tell you about my "why buy a Polaroid theory" ) but I'd start w/ boosting the contrast slider.

Anyways, the screen capture shows what a "histogram stretch" can do. Please note in the original (solid grey shaded area) you had one lump in the lower left and one spikey lump in the far,far, right and almost nothing in-between. Thecontrastenhancement destroyed what little was left of the blue sky, and that part could be preserved by a lot of PP but..... more work. Do you have this image as a 0 EV? I'd be curious to see how much sky is there.......
I am trying to learn about the histogram now. Took a few shots today with my newly delivered 50-200 lens and tried reading the histogram on them as done. Didn't have much time, though, as the sun was setting.

I'm attaching the image that I believe was at 0 EV. It was the first shot and I kept adjusting from there to see if I could get better. (I wasn't looking at histograms yesterday. Not that I would have known what I was doing anyway. :lol:

What is my ultimate goal in the histogram? To not have too much on either end and not too many spikes in the middle?

I haven't shotten anything RAW yet. Mostly because of the space constraints on my hard drive. I'm quickly filling it up just with jpeg's.

Thanks for the comments.

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Old Oct 6, 2006, 9:02 PM   #9
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pwithem wrote:
Quote:
This sounds like normal operation for working in manual mode. By the way, just to be clear, "f stop" = aperture, as you've used it above.
Quote:
Thanks for the correction. I'm still new to all this.
Quote:
Trial, error, and general familiarity with your camera and lenses will be the best guidance toward getting the best images. As I mentioned before, I have to use EV = 0.7 to get most of my shots properly exposed (see below about EV).
Quote:
I hope to be able to take some photos at the fair tomorrow and get to learn the camera better. To add to the confusion, my new lens (50-200) arrived today.:-)
Quote:
Check out this tutorial. http://web.canon.jp/Imaging/enjoydslr/index.html
It refers to Canon cameras, but it applies universally.
Quote:
I shall go here next. Thanks for the link.
Quote:
In manual mode, I'm not sure if it records the EV, since it's not an explicit setting while shooting in manual. In Av, Tv, and P modes, you can tell the camera exactly what EV you want the camera to aim for, and it will be recorded for each picture. Av (Aperture Value) let's you specify the aperture while the camera chooses the shutter to meet the EV goal you have set. Tv (Time Value) let's you specify shutter speed while the camera chooses the aperture to meet the EV you have set. In P (Program) mode, all you do is set the desired EV, and the camera chooses both shutter and aperture values. P mode can make things simple, but you lose a bit of control of your shot in the process.
Quote:
Okay, I need to go read my manual with your post here to see if I can figure out what I want to focus on experimenting with tomorrow. I know I don't like the camera set at AutoPict for most of the shots I've taken. I need to lighten all of them. I've only been playing around with the M setting for the past week trying to see if I could get better shots by it. They are, but still need some adjusting. (Partially due to the person behind the lens.)
Quote:
Thanks for your comments and help. I'm not sure I'm doing the "quote post" correctly here. Learning this system, too.
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Old Oct 6, 2006, 9:12 PM   #10
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I think the last photo has a sky you could use. Of course, you'll need to layer the lighter foliage over or under it and use a layer mask with a gradient to get them to appear simeltaniously.
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