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Old Nov 9, 2006, 12:23 PM   #1
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I posted some new macro shots from this past weekend in the closeup forum, since that forum does not get as much activity (and ya'll might be getting sick of pictures of bugs). Anyhow, if anyone is interested they are here:

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...amp;forum_id=7

Tim
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Old Nov 9, 2006, 12:36 PM   #2
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Nice shots Tim - I have not done much insect stuff yet, but the oppurtunity is there. The challange of getting just the right depth of field as they dart around would be a challenge that it appears you have mastered. I think I will start out slow, like with catapillars. I seem to have a lot of Yellow Jackets buzzing around, but so far I have not been tempted to take any pictures. It could be because these little buggers have bitten me before and like you, I have stepped on there holes they dig in the ground for there nest and they don't like it. They can sure keep you moving right along- Bruce
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Old Nov 9, 2006, 12:38 PM   #3
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Very nice macros. I'm also glad to hear you survived your wasp nest encounter! Yikes!
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Old Nov 9, 2006, 1:07 PM   #4
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Tim,

These are all great shots from a manual lens.
Your manual lens is top notch.
Although my FA100 is auto, I only use it manually for macro shots. Not much this time of the year as it is almost winter now. The lens is getting dust (figure of speech) in my car's glove box since late Sept.

Daniel
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I posted some new macro shots from this past weekend in the closeup forum, since that forum does not get as much activity (and ya'll might be getting sick of pictures of bugs). Anyhow, if anyone is interested they are here:

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...amp;forum_id=7

Tim
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Old Nov 9, 2006, 1:58 PM   #5
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bper wrote:
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I have stepped on there holes they dig in the ground for there nest and they don't like it. They can sure keep you moving right along- Bruce
great shots tim. you are definately getting it down.

bruce, my wife found one last week.

roy
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Old Nov 9, 2006, 2:14 PM   #6
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Superb photos. So jealous.



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Old Nov 9, 2006, 5:08 PM   #7
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bper wrote:
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Nice shots Tim - I have not done much insect stuff yet, but the oppurtunity is there. The challange of getting just the right depth of field as they dart around would be a challenge that it appears you have mastered. I think I will start out slow, like with catapillars. I seem to have a lot of Yellow Jackets buzzing around, but so far I have not been tempted to take any pictures. It could be because these little buggers have bitten me before and like you, I have stepped on there holes they dig in the ground for there nest and they don't like it. They can sure keep you moving right along- Bruce
Bper, We do have yellow jackets down here but they are not as common as other places, the soil may be sandier than they prefer, I don't know. I know what you mean about starting with slow bugs, my first successful macros were a garden snail and a june bug. I shoot all of my macros free hand and it is tough to hold the subject in focus. My strategy is to watch the bugs and see what they are doing and then wait for them to come to me. These bees were working some flowering weeds in the back yard so I just laid down nearby and waited for them to come to the flowers closest to me. I did the same with the wasps but they were on bushes and I was standing. Good luck, thus far I have found macros to be the most fascinating aspect of photography.

Daniel, It is a great lens. In fact, I am watching for a second one to keep as a backup. It does pretty good used as a regular lens too. The only negatives are the fact it takes about seven complete turns on the focusing ring to go from infinity to 1:1 and the fact that I can't blame my bad shots on the lens.

Thanks also Roy, Royce, and Darren. Roy, it was you who started me down this macro road. I think my wife would like to have a word with you :lol:.

Tim
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Old Nov 9, 2006, 11:29 PM   #8
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Most of my macros are flowers, and I take quite a few of them - they are easier because they don't move (as long as it isn't windy).

I have yet to get any insects as good as these - these are really good! Glad you are enjoying your Kiron lens.
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Old Nov 11, 2006, 5:32 PM   #9
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Tim - I thought I'd follow up on the Yellow Jacket thing. Every Fall in September, the skunks raid the Yellow Jacket nests and eat there fill. I assume they are eating the young larvae not yet able to fly. Apparently the stings don't bother them. Anyway, I was over atCowiche Creektoday and ran across one of these raided nest, so I took some pictures with my 50mm macro lens - Bruce

This is the actual remains of the nest hole in the ground. It is about a foot around. They only have a little hole going into this chamber. You don't want to step on it.



This is a closer look ata smallpart of there nest. The skunks kind of scatter them everywhere. Kind of neat. They do this at night when the bees are not so active.



The last shot is of a yellow jacket that happened by. The macro lens could have gotten a littlecloser if the photographer wasn't such a big chicken. There's a fine line between bravery and stupidity.


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Old Nov 11, 2006, 5:40 PM   #10
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bper wrote:
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The last shot is of a yellow jacket that happened by. The macro lens could have gotten a littlecloser if the photographer wasn't such a big chicken. There's a fine line between bravery and stupidity.
LOL! That's the main reason why I ended up deciding on a 100 mm macro lens - I can stand off a little better.
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