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Old Nov 15, 2006, 10:14 AM   #11
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After reading everyones posting I have come to the conclusion:

1. Use a fast lens - f2.8 or faster
2. Use a fast shutter speed - 1/250 or faster
3. Use a high ISO - 1600-3200
4. Use manual focus
5. Practice, practice, practice
6. Take lots of shots, trash the junk
7. Have fun doing

I think I will go to the auction and find a 135mm lens and see if I can get it here befor her next meet. I also plan on going to the gym tonight and doing some practice with the lens I have. I will be real close so I should be able to use the 18-55mm at f3.5 to practice with.

What was Roy talking about a M200 f4? Was it a 200mm f4 lens?

I have some pics posted here I have practiced with to play with the settings on my camera.

http://thekaters.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=496

Thanks for all the input. I will post some of my pics for all to see.

Bill

PS: Russ, nice pic. Great color.
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Old Nov 15, 2006, 11:24 AM   #12
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This was shot with the A200mm f/4 Pentax lens, although for indoor sports, I would try to get something a bit faster, unless you Gym is lighted far better than ours.



Nice lens, very inexpensive on ebay and now that you only use the very center of the glass with digital, extremely sharp for what you have to pay for it.

I still don't like it on my film camera because it tends to get a tad soft as you get out to the edges of the photo, but then you never use that part of the glass with APS digital.

Don't use AF with indoor sports, it will drive you crazy!

Tom
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Old Nov 15, 2006, 12:39 PM   #13
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As to shutter speeds - it is OK to blur. The ability to show motion is a learned skill. I am not an expert in Gymnastics, but there have to be times when some part of the participant does not move (eyes, head, a hand foot etc.) while the rest of the body is moving. Showing the blur, motion, action - is a learned skill. That is why some photographers specialize in sports - they know how to demonstrate the action but concentrate and focus on something that is static. Static is boring - this is sports not portraits.

You have to be knowledgeable about the sport. Not everything that is "frozen" is good. I you insist on 5+fps burst rates - get a movie camera. Learn to pan with the motion of the subject.

Capture the moment - on a dismount (beam, bars, horse - whatever) focus on the eyes or face. Capture the expression just before the feet hit the mat. Any fool can get the picture when the dismount is done - how about 1/60 of a second before the feet hit the mat - the concentration on the landing.

Then turn around and shoot the coach, other team members - get the expression/reactions. Opportunities abound.

Last of all - it's about the IMAGE not the equipment.

PDL
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Old Nov 15, 2006, 3:50 PM   #14
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Anything that gives a good picture is good. But there is motion blur and motion blur. When the blur is caused by the motif moving, it might be very desired. If the blur is caused by the photographer moving the camera, it's normally not desired at all. (As always, there are exceptions)

Movement blur:
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Old Nov 15, 2006, 3:51 PM   #15
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Camera shake blur:
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Old Nov 15, 2006, 8:16 PM   #16
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PDL wrote:
Quote:
First remove the autofocus function from the shutter button - there are settings that will allow it to be controlled by the OK button.
Is there a practical difference between moving the autofocus to the OK button, as opposing to doing a half shutter press to set focus without taking a shot? I've always used the half press when setting up to take an action shot at a specific place ("ambush photography"). Is there some reason why using the OK button would be better?

Thanks,

--Brett
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Old Nov 15, 2006, 8:39 PM   #17
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BrettTurner wrote:
Quote:
PDL wrote:
Quote:
First remove the autofocus function from the shutter button - there are settings that will allow it to be controlled by the OK button.
Is there a practical difference between moving the autofocus to the OK button, as opposing to doing a half shutter press to set focus without taking a shot? I've always used the half press when setting up to take an action shot at a specific place ("ambush photography"). Is there some reason why using the OK button would be better?

Thanks,

--Brett
In this case, I believe manual focus is easier. Instead of holding the shutter halfway down, you can just set the focus manually, then press the shutter (without the half stop) when you want to take the picture.

In terms of results, there is no difference. It's just that one is easier than the other IMHO.

Russ
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Old Nov 15, 2006, 8:51 PM   #18
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Here are 3 picts i took at the practice hall. All was taken in a row. Why are the colors all different?

It has fluorescent bulbs in the hall.






Why did two of them have so much yellow in them. To see the specs on my camera settings go here.

http://thekaters.com/gallery2/main.p...avId=x7a6a7de7

Each picture has it.


Thansk

Bill

PS. I was using the Pentax DA 50-200mm

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Old Nov 15, 2006, 10:09 PM   #19
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Were you using the auto setting for white balance? I've noticed that I'll sometimes get variations with white balance when shooting in difficult conditions and using AWB. Usually if the first shot or two look a little strange I'll use the custom wb option. I keep using whatever white thing that happens to be handy - really need to get a grey card (my local camera shop has one for about $6.00. It's only grey with instructions on the back side. What I'd really like is a grey card on one side and a true white card on the other - do they make such a thing?). It takes only a second to set the WB, and can make a huge difference.
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Old Nov 15, 2006, 10:20 PM   #20
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I had the balance set for fluorescent light
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