Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Pentax / Samsung dSLR, K Mount Mirrorless

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Nov 25, 2006, 10:20 AM   #1
Member
 
Stev1e's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 46
Default

Has anyone tried one of these:-

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/SHIFT-adapter-...QQcmdZViewItem

Just wondered if it would achieve a reasonable result with the 28mm 2.8A.

Steve
Stev1e is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Nov 25, 2006, 10:54 AM   #2
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

no, but it's a cool piece of equipment

roy
  Reply With Quote
Old Nov 25, 2006, 11:22 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
bilybianca's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Hassleholm, Sweden
Posts: 3,435
Default

Note that it can only be used with the lenses mentioned in the ad, the Pentax k-mount is only on the body side of the adapter.

BTW, is there any advantage in using a shift lens instead of doing the corrections in PP?

Kjell
bilybianca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 25, 2006, 3:03 PM   #4
Member
 
Stev1e's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 46
Default

Kjell, thanks for pointing out about the lens compatability.

You're right about manipulating in PP, but I would prefer to capture the image at the time I take the shot. Just me I suppose!

Perhaps I should save up for one of those nice pentax shift lenses?

Steve
Stev1e is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 25, 2006, 3:19 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
bilybianca's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Hassleholm, Sweden
Posts: 3,435
Default

Stev1e wrote:
Quote:
Perhaps I should save up for one of those nice pentax shift lenses?

Steve
That's what I'm doing, but I'm not surewether it would be a waste of money in the digital era. Anyone feel like giving advice?

Kjell
bilybianca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 25, 2006, 5:05 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,052
Default

I vaguely think about a shift lens whenever I use the skew tool in photoshop. I'd rather get the *60-250 lens when it comes out, or maybe one of the limiteds, since it isn't that big of a deal to use photoshop to straighten the lines (a trick someone who works as an architect/designer showed me). Just need to make sure to allow enough extra on the sides.
mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 25, 2006, 9:42 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
NonEntity1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Lake Placid Florida USA
Posts: 2,689
Default

OK, since everyone else seems to know what exactly this thing is, I will be the one to ask . . . Could someone please explain what a shift adaptor is(and shift lens for that matter) and what they are used for?

Thanks,
Tim
NonEntity1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 25, 2006, 10:48 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,052
Default

Have you ever taken pictures of buildings from the ground and noticed how they look like they are falling away from you? It's caused because of the angle of the camera (film/sensor surface) in relationship to the building. I've never used a large format view camera (is that the right term?) but once talked to someone who had one. You not only have to control the focal distance of the lens to the camera, you can change the angle of the film surface, which will change the relationship of the photo subjectto the camera. A shift lens does something similar - it changes the angle by shifting the lens, rather than the film surface like the big camera my friend had, which will straighten the lines of a building.

If you want to do something that will give you an idea (because I don't know if I'm explaining it well), take a picture of your computer monitor, holding the camera at the middle point of the monitor, looking straight ahead. The monitor's vertical lines will look straight. Now put the camera below the camera and shoot it looking upward. You'll get a "keystone" effect, the top is narrower than the bottom and the monitor looks like it is falling away from you (the sensor is at an angle to the subject). A shift lens corrects this. Does that make sense?
mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 26, 2006, 6:25 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
nlp239's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 719
Default

Let me go one step further.

Remember how cameras had bellows in the old days? No all bellows moved on a straight axis. Many of them could be set-up at strange angles for both studio and architecture photography.

Its all about prespective control and correction.

Here's an article for you. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perspective_correction
nlp239 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 26, 2006, 6:26 AM   #10
Member
 
Stev1e's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 46
Default

Yep, very well explained.

It's a matter of perspective and vanishing points. You can achieve similar results by pointing the lens along the azimuth line but this way you need to move away from the subject which results in cropping of the picture during processing.

Steve
Stev1e is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 9:33 PM.