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Old Dec 21, 2006, 12:47 AM   #11
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Hi Russ ~ and thanks, buddy.

You know, I had just decided that I am NOT going to be deterred from the K10D. With that camera, and some really good lenses, I should fare very well indeed. I am reasonably sure that this gear will be overkill, considering my shallow photographic capabilities, but I want something that will be strong enough for me to grow into - and still have a lot of fun using it after I have matured in its operations. I am also quite sure that I won't have any regrets behind my purchase of it.

I am trying to learn all that I can about manual focusing/apertures, ISO & shutter speed settings - and all pertinent concerns about this type of photography. It is a whole lot to take in, but I have a huge hunger for it :-).

Blessings,

Nate
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Old Dec 21, 2006, 1:48 AM   #12
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NLAlston wrote:
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With that camera, and some really good lenses, I should fare very well indeed. I am reasonably sure that this gear will be overkill, considering my shallow photographic capabilities, but I want something that will be strong enough for me to grow into - and still have a lot of fun using it after I have matured in its operations.
This is my philosopy also. But – am I the only one who see the camera body as an accessory to my lenses, and not the other way around?

I have a set of fantastic 15–30 years old lenses, and they will last for another 30 years if I don't destroy them by uncareful handling. My camera body (DS) is one year old and already considered out-of-date.

My real worry is that Pentax will go out of business like KonicaMinolta, and therefore I hope that K10D will become a huge commercial success, followed by others!

Kjell
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Old Dec 21, 2006, 4:24 AM   #13
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There are some comparison shots in this thread: http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...mp;forum_id=80

Maybe these are the one you were looking for?
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Old Dec 21, 2006, 5:20 AM   #14
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The biggest difference between a superzoom like that and for example the 50-200mm, won't be the sharpness alone.

I have a Tamron 28-200 XR, and although I like it a lot to travel with, and I'm very pleased with the colors and images, it has some serious barrel distortion (= straight lines at the edges getting bent)

This is a problem all "super-zooms" suffer from, so you might want to take that into account.

As long as you're not shooting all architecture it's no big thing to worry about though...

You can get those Tamrons for a very nice price new on ebay, and for the money I think they're great value. I wouldn't spend more than 200$ on it though...spent 150$ on my XR...
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Old Dec 21, 2006, 5:31 AM   #15
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I am a bit in the same boat. I hopefully will get my K10D tomorrow and I'm probably gonna buy some old lenses (K or M or A) for it.

Is it difficult to use these lenses on a K10D and do they really all fit without any problems? Do I have to take care of certain things?

I have been using a Nikon FE, and I know about aperture and shutter speeds and I also know how to use a lightmeter (I used a Gossen Sixtar and Lunasix 3)

So I think it's also going to be a lot of fun working with these old lenses.

But I'm totally blank when it comes to Pentax. Is there some sort of guide about how to use all these old lenses (especially K, M and A lenses)?

Any help would be appreciated very much.

Greetings from Holland,

Dirk.



NLAlston wrote:
Quote:
Hi Russ ~ and thanks, buddy.

You know, I had just decided that I am NOT going to be deterred from the K10D. With that camera, and some really good lenses, I should fare very well indeed. I am reasonably sure that this gear will be overkill, considering my shallow photographic capabilities, but I want something that will be strong enough for me to grow into - and still have a lot of fun using it after I have matured in its operations. I am also quite sure that I won't have any regrets behind my purchase of it.

I am trying to learn all that I can about manual focusing/apertures, ISO & shutter speed settings - and all pertinent concerns about this type of photography. It is a whole lot to take in, but I have a huge hunger for it :-).

Blessings,

Nate
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Old Dec 21, 2006, 5:49 AM   #16
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Hallo "buurman"!

Dirk, all AF lenses made for Pentax (by pentax or other manufacturers) will function completely automatic right away. All you need to do is twist them on the camera


As for older lenses:

This is where I enjoy using Pentax the most. People underestimate how fun it is to use older lenses, how much you can learn by using them, and how little money you have to spend!

A-lenses will have everything a newer lens has, except autofocus. Put the aperture ring on the A position and use it as you would use your kit lens.

In order to use older lenses without the A-position, you'll have to change a setting in your custom menu 1 time. Go to the camera menu > Custom settings > Using Aperture ring > ON/enabled

Congratulations, your camera will now be able to accept +50 year old lenses!

Lenses for the K-mount will fit on the camera without an adapter. Put your camera in M-mode and hit the AE-L button to get an automatic exposure. Press the shutter and you've got a properly exposed shot. Simple


M42 (screw mount) and other lenses have to be used with an adapter. Using this adapter does not make them a K-mount lens! They have to be stopped down manually, as they lack the little lever on the back of the lens that the camera uses to stop down the lens for you.
You can get an exposure reading though, but you'll have to set it to the correct aperture yourself, the camera can't do it for you. Hit the AE-L button and read which aperture the camera has selected. Now manually stop down the lens to that aperture. Hit the shutter and see if it's properly exposed.

(This last one is a lot harder and requires some experimentation. However, the excellent quality of some of these older lenses compensates that nicely)


On all MF focus lenses you will get a focus confirmation "beep" when the camera thinks you've focussed correctly. This comes in VERY handy and is unique among DSLRs I believe.


Maybe we should gather all info we've posted on here about older lenses and put them in some sort of guide, that way I can put it on my website and we can just link to it when this question arises again

Tom
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Old Dec 21, 2006, 6:13 AM   #17
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Thanks Tom,

That is a great help and explains a lot. I almost can't waittill I get my camera.

I agree that is great fun to experiment with this, and I hope I can get my hands on some of these older lenses. I would like to get a longerprime (300mm or more). But a fast wide-angle and standard lens would be welcome too.

Do you have any tips where to get these in Holland?








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Old Dec 21, 2006, 6:16 AM   #18
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DirkG wrote:
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Do you have any tips where to get these in Holland?
kapaza.nl , ebay and other 2nd hand sites.
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Old Dec 21, 2006, 10:50 AM   #19
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Is a smc PENTAX-A 1:2 50mm any good or would a Pentax-M 50mm 1:1.7 be better?

I haven't got the camera yet, but i'm developing a case of LBA I'm afraid.

I can also get a Tokina 28mm 1:2.8 and a 135mm 1:2.8 Tokina. Are they any good?

BTW. Do I have to isolate the contacts on the camera if I want to use such older lenses?








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Old Dec 21, 2006, 11:42 AM   #20
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I've heard the 50mm f2 isn't as sharp as the 1.7 versions of the lens - don't know if that applies to the A version also. The answer does partly depend on whether you want the auto exposure capability of the A lens. I'm very happy with my M 1.7 and prefer it over the M 1.4 (which I still haven't done anything about yet. One of these days I'll get my act together about selling it - sigh!). It is as sharp as anything, I don't mind manual lenses and so have no desire to spend more money to get AF and AE. If it were me, I'd get the M 1.7.

You don't have to do anything about the contacts with K mount lenses, just put them on the camera like any of the modern lenses.
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