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Old Dec 21, 2006, 11:26 PM   #1
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Well, my aunt is on a budget wedding and she asked if I would take pics at the wedding for her, and since she is family I said yes. I only purchased my k100 near the end of summer, and I was wondering if you guys have any tips for me while I shoot at the wedding this weekend. A question I have is, while shooting indoors, how can i avoid the yellowish color? I tried using the flash on the camera while adjusting the exposure, but I get little results and the white balance is sort of confusing. Any help would be apprecaited, this is by far the most informative and friendly forum I have ever been to. Thanks in advance.
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Old Dec 21, 2006, 11:35 PM   #2
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http://www.beaumontcameraclub.com/Mi...ing%20Tips.htm

It is one of the best articles I've seen on the novice wanting to do a wedding.

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Old Dec 22, 2006, 3:18 AM   #3
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kioas wrote:
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Well, my aunt is on a budget wedding and she asked if I would take pics at the wedding for her, and since she is family I said yes. I only purchased my k100 near the end of summer, and I was wondering if you guys have any tips for me while I shoot at the wedding this weekend. A question I have is, while shooting indoors, how can i avoid the yellowish color? I tried using the flash on the camera while adjusting the exposure, but I get little results and the white balance is sort of confusing. Any help would be apprecaited, this is by far the most informative and friendly forum I have ever been to. Thanks in advance.
I found the "flash" WB setting on my *ist DL2 producing very accurate colors, so would recommend to use that when working with flash.

The manual WB is quite easy to do - carry a white object with you (small piece of paper will do for example, backside of a white business card, or else) and place somewhere where you'll shoot pictures. Choose manual WB, aim at that white
object and press shutter as if you would like to take a photo. The camera will now adjust white balance according to your object. Done.

Another possible solution for you is just to include a white object in a picture and postprocess the image by saying "this is white" and photo retouching software will adjust the whole picture.

HTH,
Th.
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Old Dec 22, 2006, 4:58 AM   #4
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PeterP wrote:
Quote:
http://www.beaumontcameraclub.com/Mi...ing%20Tips.htm

It is one of the best articles I've seen on the novice wanting to do a wedding.
Very helpful indeed!

I plan to do the photography for my little brothers communion in 2007, so thank you Bookmarked it
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Old Dec 22, 2006, 7:24 AM   #5
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Just found a rather good looking article through my favorite tutorial site (http://www.good-tutorials.com) its located at http://tips.artificialrainbow.com/ar...ticle006.shtml

hope it helps

Ronny

(edit: just found this one - http://www.aljacobs.com/NEW%20WEDDING.pdf don't know if it is good, 79pages am reading it now)
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Old Dec 22, 2006, 11:08 AM   #6
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thkn777 wrote:
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kioas wrote:
Quote:
Well, my aunt is on a budget wedding and she asked if I would take pics at the wedding for her, and since she is family I said yes. I only purchased my k100 near the end of summer, and I was wondering if you guys have any tips for me while I shoot at the wedding this weekend. A question I have is, while shooting indoors, how can i avoid the yellowish color? I tried using the flash on the camera while adjusting the exposure, but I get little results and the white balance is sort of confusing. Any help would be apprecaited, this is by far the most informative and friendly forum I have ever been to. Thanks in advance.
I found the "flash" WB setting on my *ist DL2 producing very accurate colors, so would recommend to use that when working with flash.

The manual WB is quite easy to do - carry a white object with you (small piece of paper will do for example, backside of a white business card, or else) and place somewhere where you'll shoot pictures. Choose manual WB, aim at that white
object and press shutter as if you would like to take a photo. The camera will now adjust white balance according to your object. Done.

Another possible solution for you is just to include a white object in a picture and postprocess the image by saying "this is white" and photo retouching software will adjust the whole picture.

HTH,
Th.
Shoot RAW and PP later. Much easier than remembering to set the WB all the time.


Darren
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Old Dec 24, 2006, 10:33 AM   #7
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With digital now, an average wedding depending on length of coverage will produce somewhere between 700 and 2000 images. More if the hired company provides a second shooter.

Post workflow on the selects to get them ready for sales presentation takes around another 40 to 80 hours.
Adding raw conversion and and trying to do WB settings in post while doable would not be desirable.

Get it right in camera the first time is much perferable, fix it in PhotoShop is not a desirable option.

There is also the space issue for taking that many RAW files, CF cards fail so I won't use anything larger than 1gb cards for anyting important, that way you only lose small bits if a card dies.

Speaking of failures you should have backup for everything, multiple flashes, multiple bodeis, multiple lenses, spare radio triggers, anything that might fail needs backup if you are hired to do an event.

Dal1970 wrote:
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Soot RAW and PP later. Much easier than remembering to set the WB all the time.
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Old Dec 24, 2006, 1:27 PM   #8
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I am with Peter on this one, processing that many RAW files, especially since you have to change settings on so many of them, can be extremely time consuming. I use RAW in the church when I do not want to use flash, other than that I set the white balance for each change in lighting. I still end up with about 80 hours of work.

Use RAW whenever you cannot get good jpegs, such as odd lighting situations or for portraits that will be enlarged to 16" X 20" sizes (a good 6MP RAW file will result in a good print at this size).

Ira

http://www.aicphotography.blogspot.com/
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Old Dec 24, 2006, 5:52 PM   #9
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Ishot a Wedding for the first time this Sept. Didn't turn out as nice as I would have liked but got some good shots. So heres a few things I learned in the process. If your not completely comfortable with adjusting camera settings, shoot RAW. Much easier to fix RAW files than jpegs. If you have the choice, take an assistant with you, someone that is people friendly that can help you with posing the wedding party, help carry the equipment etc. Have plenty of memory cards and shoot a LOT. The more you shoot the more likely you'll get some good pics. DONT shoot wide open even indoors. I tried that and a lot of pics were soft as could be. Take a tripod for the set poses, and a monopod for the candids if possible. Good luck and I hope you have fun, I did. It was hectic but a blast.
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Old Dec 24, 2006, 11:22 PM   #10
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Only getting some good images is not acceptable at a wedding.
To generate a modern wedding book (the old albums are a bit passe now) like a Furi can take over 200 high quality images.

If you want, take a peek at what the Furi books look like (They are very expensive to have generated!) http://www.furifineartbooks.co.za/flash/index.htm

Shooting wide is fine (though not easy) I've shot at f/1.2 with no issues, but you have to know what you are doing and how much will be in focus(dof) at what distances.

Yes a tripod is a given, though stabilization comes in handy. :-)

Spiritbro77 wrote:
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The more you shoot the more likely you'll get some good pics. DONT shoot wide open even indoors. I tried that and a lot of pics were soft as could be. T
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