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Old Dec 30, 2006, 10:49 AM   #1
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I'm almost embarrassed to ask this, but I haven't really figured out the answer. I remember reading in the owner's manual that you can pretty-much leave the shake reduction on all the time except when using a tripod. My question is: Do you HAVE to turn it off if it's on a tripod? If so; why? Will it hurt anything, or is it simply not necessary? If I ever forget to turn it off, will it hurt my beloved K100D?
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Old Dec 30, 2006, 11:48 AM   #2
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There is no reason to have the camera doing extra processing on your image when it isn't needed and all other cameras I have had with shake reduction have shown a less sharp image when it was turned on when it wasn't needed.

I have not had my K10D long enough to test this theory, but I expect it will work the same.

Tom
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Old Dec 30, 2006, 12:03 PM   #3
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ennacac wrote:
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There is no reason to have the camera doing extra processing on your image when it isn't needed and all other cameras I have had with shake reduction have shown a less sharp image when it was turned on when it wasn't needed.

I have not had my K10D long enough to test this theory, but I expect it will work the same.

Tom
That makes sense. I haven't tested it either. The way I understand it is that it's almost like a gyroscope which stabilizes the sensor. If the camera is being held still, than it just doesn't need to do much...right? I don't quite get how it could hurt anything or degrade the image. I only ask because the manual almost makes it seem as though it could.
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Old Dec 30, 2006, 3:34 PM   #4
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Glad you asked the question as I was wondering the same thing !!!!

Guess I'll try a tripod shot with it turned off and if result OK leave it at that,but if it's a windy day and light tripod might be attracted to turn SR on !!!

It's the word "Caution" on page 68 which concerns me.

Ian Mc

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Old Dec 30, 2006, 4:43 PM   #5
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Ian Mc wrote:
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It's the word "Caution" on page 68 which concerns me.
That's it! I kew I remembered reading something in the manual that made me think it was bad to leave it on. The line reads:

Caution: Be sure to turn off the Shake Reducion switch when using the camera with a tripod.

It just doesn't say why. My fear is that I'll forget someday and possibly hurt something. Although I still don't see how.


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Old Dec 30, 2006, 5:40 PM   #6
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I did a little research on this, as I was wondering what harm it could do too.


This article explained a lot: http://digital-photography-school.co...on-on-tripods/

No system is flawless, nothing is.
Basicly when there are no vibrations (or undetectable ones, like on a tripod) and the SR system is still on, the camera might "bug" and detect shakes that are not there, or even cause shake by looking for them. Remember the system compensates movement by moving the sensor trough magnetic fields. If these fields are disturbed by anything, they might "compensate" for something thats not there, and so giving you a more blurred image.


Know that this is not a Pentax only issue. In the Nikon and Canon stabilized lenses' manuals you will find the same recommendation to turn IS off while shooting on a tripod.


So it won't break your camera to leave it on, they're just saying that it might give you a blurred picture because of a bug sometimes
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Old Dec 30, 2006, 5:51 PM   #7
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Thanks TDN.Somewhat reassuring although not too thrilled with the camera being"bugged".

Looks like switch of SR when on tripod or try high ISOs and compensate later.

Ian Mc.
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Old Dec 30, 2006, 7:02 PM   #8
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I took some pictures of the moon on two different days - the first with SR on (forgot to turn it off) and then re-took the pictures the next day with it turned off. I couldn't tell much difference between the two sets of pictures. It seems like you might have somewhat fuzzy pictures if you leave SR on while on a tripod, but it doesn't necessarily happen and it won't hurt the camera.
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Old Dec 31, 2006, 6:30 AM   #9
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mtngal wrote:
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I took some pictures of the moon on two different days - the first with SR on (forgot to turn it off) and then re-took the pictures the next day with it turned off. I couldn't tell much difference between the two sets of pictures. It seems like you might have somewhat fuzzy pictures if you leave SR on while on a tripod, but it doesn't necessarily happen and it won't hurt the camera.
That is 100% correct

The camera isn't "bugged", it's just that the manufacturers warn you that it could happen that the SR detects something thats not there when it's mounted on a tripod. So it's better to turn it off
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Old Dec 31, 2006, 12:56 PM   #10
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Hi gadgetnut,

I'm pretty much an empiricist -- tried it both ways -- and found no real difference. I don't bother to turn it off. . . but if I were to be taking a critical set of shots -- I'd bracket, shoot both Jpeg and RAW, and take a series wiht SR on and off -- just to be sure I get something I can use, as Murphy's Law hovers over my head in particular.

I've heard about this since I first got a stabilized camera (Panny FZ1), but haven't found any practical validity with any of the cameras that I've had -- I suggest you try it yourself and develop your own answer.

Scott
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