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Old Jan 19, 2007, 1:49 PM   #1
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Although I am not a great fan of editing I am impressed with good quality HDR shots as in those from the Edinburgh Photographic Society:

http://www.edinburghphotographicsoci...hp?album=27022

I don't have CS2 and my version of PSP (Coded Color) doesn't cover this.

Any suggestions for an El cheepo HDR programme please with a free trial?

Cheers:Ian Mc
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Old Jan 19, 2007, 9:06 PM   #2
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Ian Mc wrote:
Quote:
Although I am not a great fan of editing I am impressed with good quality HDR shots as in those from the Edinburgh Photographic Society:

http://www.edinburghphotographicsoci...hp?album=27022

I don't have CS2 and my version of PSP (Coded Color) doesn't cover this.

Any suggestions for an El cheepo HDR programme please with a free trial?

Cheers:Ian Mc
http://www.hdrsoft.com/download.html#pmp

http://www.supportingcomputers.net/


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Old Jan 19, 2007, 10:43 PM   #3
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Thanks for that url nznhut.I have just downloaded Photomatix so that gives me a couple of trial programmes to play with.

Cheers:Ian Mc
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Old Jan 22, 2007, 12:52 AM   #4
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Ian - I have been interested inHDR also and do not have CS2, so I downloaded the free version of Artizen and am going to play with it. If I like it, I will buy the full program. It looks like it will do a lot and has some good tutorials, so what have I got to lose.

I haven't played with HDR before, but the software says you should use a tripod and take at least 3 pictures of a scene, 1 normal,1 under and 1 over exposed. It mentions that you can use the auto bracketing feature of your camera to do this and I thought I would start by setting this at +/- 1. Now for the fun part, learning.

The one question I have is would you be betteroff toshoot jpegs or willraw work better for this type of photography? Merging 3 raw files would be enormous- Bruce
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Old Jan 22, 2007, 1:26 AM   #5
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Blending 3 RAW files.Sounds ultra impressive !! LOL

Thanks for reply Bruce for me still working on the basic stuff but like to have rough plan ahead !!!

Cheers:Ian Mc
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Old Jan 22, 2007, 7:52 AM   #6
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Don't yell at me if it's not high sophisticated, technically 100% correct etc - you wanted a basic idea

First the basic idea. A HDR is somewhat like a panorama - you "stitch" several different exposed photos together to get MORE information on an image of the same size. (A panorama would be a number of photos with the same exposure stitched together to cover a bigger area.)

- for a start you can play with your RAW converter
- open a photo which naturally has some high dynamic range, i.e. landcape with sky, clouds and in the foreground some darker objects like houses, people, plants etc.
- now over- and underexpose in your RAW tool... as you can see you can focus on ONE picture area to look ok - not all.
- the camera can't cover your eyes dynamic range and that's why photo's look different from what you feel they should look compared with the original scene


Now - simular to the panorama idea - you do the following: if your camera can't cover the whole "exposure range" in one shot... take 2,3,4 or whatever number of shots! Of the same subject! the same scene! Have one picture with the great sky, but nearly black foreground, one scene with a blown out sky, but well exposed foreground etc.

Now - similar to a panorama - you need to "combine" these shots to get the final photo. In simple words - you "stack" these images with the different exposures to have sky and foreground well exposed.

Unfortunately neither your monitor nor the printer can show this HDR. So the next step is to "tone-map" this huge dynamic range into a normal 16 or 8bit image (LDR). Of course you loose something - but at the end you might end up with a picture that is closer to what you've seen with your eyes.

To start:
- save the image from your RAW converter with -2/0/+2 each (image1, image2, image3)
- download a demo of a HDR tool, load the 3 images and let it create the HDR (should look... errm... different)
- the do the tone mapping, just play with the sliders to get something that pleases you at least halfway
- save as LDR (tif, jpeg) and use normal image manipulation to finish.

Hope that helps,
Th.
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Old Jan 22, 2007, 1:17 PM   #7
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thkn777 wrote:
Quote:
Don't yell at me if it's not high sophisticated, technically 100% correct etc - you wanted a basic idea

First the basic idea. A HDR is somewhat like a panorama - you "stitch" several different exposed photos together to get MORE information on an image of the same size. (A panorama would be a number of photos with the same exposure stitched together to cover a bigger area.)

- for a start you can play with your RAW converter
- open a photo which naturally has some high dynamic range, i.e. landcape with sky, clouds and in the foreground some darker objects like houses, people, plants etc.
- now over- and underexpose in your RAW tool... as you can see you can focus on ONE picture area to look ok - not all.
- the camera can't cover your eyes dynamic range and that's why photo's look different from what you feel they should look compared with the original scene


Now - simular to the panorama idea - you do the following: if your camera can't cover the whole "exposure range" in one shot... take 2,3,4 or whatever number of shots! Of the same subject! the same scene! Have one picture with the great sky, but nearly black foreground, one scene with a blown out sky, but well exposed foreground etc.

Now - similar to a panorama - you need to "combine" these shots to get the final photo. In simple words - you "stack" these images with the different exposures to have sky and foreground well exposed.

Unfortunately neither your monitor nor the printer can show this HDR. So the next step is to "tone-map" this huge dynamic range into a normal 16 or 8bit image (LDR). Of course you loose something - but at the end you might end up with a picture that is closer to what you've seen with your eyes.

To start:
- save the image from your RAW converter with -2/0/+2 each (image1, image2, image3)
- download a demo of a HDR tool, load the 3 images and let it create the HDR (should look... errm... different)
- the do the tone mapping, just play with the sliders to get something that pleases you at least halfway
- save as LDR (tif, jpeg) and use normal image manipulation to finish.

Hope that helps,
Th.
I have used both shooting 3 different exposures in RAW, combining, converting, etc, and also 3 in JPEG. The images are sometimes very good, sometimes artificial to the point of being posterized or cartoonish.

However, I am now using a technique which I like as good, if not better, than the RAW method above, or the 3 bracketed JPEG. It is used with the Photomatix software, so I can't say how it works, or if it works, with others.

Take a normal exposed RAW file, and open it in Photomatix with File > open. It automatically makes it an HDR image.Then tone map it with either the detail enhancer, or tone compressor settings. I have found with the tone compressor settings, you get pretty good results if you put it on maximum brightness. The detail extractor tends to give the HDR effect, without some of the extremes you often see. I am posting this at work, so I will post several examples later.
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Old Jan 22, 2007, 5:05 PM   #8
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I'm still new to this process & have only processed a few images - all hand held and not too easy to achieve when it's blowing a gale but a few were close enough provided that the 'auto align' function was checked.

I used Photomatrix to process this image:


With this result:


And this:


With this result:


I've also played around with Atizen but the results are more difficult to ahieve.
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Old Jan 22, 2007, 6:08 PM   #9
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My HDR Photos from my city Antalya/Turkey







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Old Jan 22, 2007, 6:10 PM   #10
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