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Old Jan 25, 2007, 7:57 PM   #1
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Hi Guys,
I am very seriously considering the K100D. From reading around its quite clear that the K10D is better although more expensive, approx 200GBP more.

This purchase will be my first DSLR and ideally I would like to take the camera to the slopes (for some boarding shots) as well as general photography back home in the UK, landscapes, surfing contests.

However my main concern is dust when changing lenses and how weather-proof the K100D is. Both issues the K10D addresses with anti-dust ccd coating, built in dust shaker and weather seals. Exactly how good are they on the K10D?

The image stabilizer for me is a must have on a camera for me (fairly shakey and weak puney hands) and to my knowledge pentax is the only dslr to offer image stability. Am I correct in this assumption? I was considering the D40 but have gone off that for this particular reason. I am aware pentax recommends turning the SR off when shooting panning shots.

My question then is should I wait a couple of months extra and save the extra for the K10D or should I be ok with the K100.

Can anyone reccommend a half decent telephoto lens between 50 - 150 GBP that also works with the auto focus?

Many thanks

Kris
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Old Jan 25, 2007, 8:24 PM   #2
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welcome to the board kris.
this question is a no brainer if you can afford it. why get down the road and say ,, what if??
ck the tamron and sigma 70-300mm lenses. peruse this site and you'll find a lot of info on both.

roy
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Old Jan 25, 2007, 10:20 PM   #3
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I do agree with roy, however, if you are a newbie to dslr's then I would start with the K100D it's a great camera and then you can put any extra you saved into accessories, which will also work on the K10 down the road (or whatever the next generation camera will be).
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Old Jan 25, 2007, 11:06 PM   #4
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Both of these cameras are excellent - I like the K100 better for natural low light conditions as it is less noisy at 1600 ISO.

I wouldn't make a wholesale K10 over K100 recommendation - I think it depends on the individual. The biggest thing I found when I first got the K10 was that it was far more complicated, as well as versatile. There are a number of additional adjustments - fine tuning if you will - that you can do with the K10 over the K100, and I like having a couple of the controls on the body that are in menus on the K10. I'm still learning how to handle the K10 and get the best from it. If I can ever find my manual, I want to re-read it through again because I'm finding more and more that I'm not sure about.

What is your photography background? Are you coming from a p&s, or were you a film SLR user and understand the basics of photography? If you are coming from a p&s without much background in photography (but want to learn) then get the K100 and have fun learning about what everything does. In about a year or two you'll have your money saved up for another camera and can buy the K10, then use the K100 as a second camera body. You can put a tele on one camera body and a wide angle on the other and not have to switch lenses quite as often.

One of the big selling points for the K10 was the weather seals - but I never had any trouble snowshoeing with a DS (though I didn't venture out in the rain or while it was still snowing). I wouldn't chance cross-country skiing because I'm such a beginner skier though. If you are going to be out often while it is actually snowing I'd wait and get K10, otherwise I don't think it matters that much (there's always plastic bags).

You should probably take a look at the 70-300mm lenses (both Tamron and Sigma make them) first, though, because you'll probably want the extra reach for surfing contests. The other option is the DA 50-200 - a sharp, workmanlike (and not too expensive!) lens that I use a lot.

In many ways you really can't go wrong with either camera - if you decide to get the K10, be prepared for a much longer/bigger learning curve (no matter what your photography background is - there are a whole lot more options and controls!).
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Old Jan 25, 2007, 11:35 PM   #5
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kristianjones_uk wrote:


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The image stabilizer for me is a must have on a camera for me (fairly shakey and weak puney hands) and to my knowledge pentax is the only dslr to offer image stability. Am I correct in this assumption? I was considering the D40 but have gone off that for this particular reason. I am aware pentax recommends turning the SR off when shooting panning shots.
There's a good article on stabilization in the current (Jan/Feb 2007) issue of PC Photo magazine. According to the article, sensor-shift stabilization technology is used not only in the Pentax K10D and K100D, but also in the Sony DSLR-A100 and Samsung GX-10.


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My question then is should I wait a couple of months extra and save the extra for the K10D or should I be ok with the K100.
Depends on two things: what you are going to want to buy BESIDES the kit camera itself; and how much money you have to spend. I assume you have at least $1000US to spend or you would not be talking about the K10D.

One of my brothers-in-law just bought a Canon Rebel XTi. I'm not sure he knows what he wants to do with it, but he can afford it and felt it was time to go that route. He may surprise me, but I doubt that he is going to be hit with lens-buying addiction. Having spent close to $1000 on the camera, he may now be content to use the kit lens forever. If you think you'll be able to be happy shooting subjects that are close enough for you to photograph them with an 18-55mm lens, then by all means, get the K10D, as it's unquestionably a better camera.

BUT...

A lot of the K10D's features are sort of "optional" in the sense that they don't really make the camera capable of taking BETTER PICTURES, and better pictures ought to be the point of the whole exercise, right? You pay for the K10D's dust reduction feature - but you can blow the dust off the K100D's sensor with a bulb blower. You pay for the weather proofing of the K10D, but you can simply take good care of a K100D and don't go outside with it when it's raining. You pay for the ability to shoot DNG instead of PEF in the K10D, but you can shoot PEF in the K100D and convert to DNG (without loss) on your computer. I'm not by any means saying that a K100D owner can compensate for the lack of every good feature of the K10D. I really wish I could get a bigger buffer on the K100D; I gather the K10D doesn't suffer from this problem the way the K100D does. I'm not even saying that these features of the K10D are unimportant. I would like weather-proofing very much, as I do occasionally find myself shooting in inclement weather. But the difference between the K100D and the K10D is not the difference between one camera that's only pretty good and another camera that's very good. Both of these cameras are very good cameras. As the owner of a K100D, I bristle a bit when I hear it described as a "beginner's camera." Maybe so. But it's better than any professional camera available for any price just a few years ago. You will be able to take great photos with a K100D.

And it is very likely that you will want to spend more money after you buy the camera - on a bag, a good tripod ($100+), perhaps an ExpoDisc ($100) or some filters, and especially on one or more additional lenses. Heard about "lens buying addiction" (LBA)? It's a real phenomenon and we joke about it because most of us are suffering from it. If you buy a K10D and want to shoot birds (to take one of my favorite subjects), you aren't going to be doing that with the kit lens. Portraits? You're going to want something a little longer than 55mm. Macro photography? You'll want a macro lens. Versatility? You'll want to replace the 18-55 kit lens with an 18-200 or 28-125 or similar zoom. In short, I think it's fair to say that you should plan to spend at least a few hundred dollars after you buy the camera, to buy the lenses you want and need to do with the camera the things you want to do.

So if you're budget is $1000 US, and you suspect that you're not going to be content with a kit 18-55mm lens, then buy the K100D body for $500 and spend the rest of your budget on maybe two half decent lenses. If you think that you will be content with the kit lens, well, then spend your $1000 on the K10D. Or buy the K100D and save the $500 for something else.

If your budget is $1500, then it's a tough decision. I can only tell you what I did, which is: I've spent well over twice the cost of my K100D on lenses, and I don't regret taking this route. Remember that in most respects, the lens matters more than the camera. A K100D with a really good lens is going to take better shots than a K10D with a mediocre lens (assuming the same photographer in both cases).

Summary: Buy the K10D if your budget permits - but be aware that there's a very good chance that as soon as you get the camera, you're going to want to spend a lot of money on lenses.


Quote:
Can anyone reccommend a half decent telephoto lens between 50 - 150 GBP that also works with the auto focus?
The Pentax 50-200 is very respected. I had one and liked it, but I sold it to get a Tamron 18-200 that I think is as good and more versatile. There are LOTS of choices in the lens market, in fact, it's bewildering.

Good luck.

Will
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Old Jan 26, 2007, 3:14 AM   #6
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Welcome Kris,

every point said above I agree on but still got my 5cents to put in,

before buying anything go to a camera shop and let them explain you the camera's and get them in your hands.
They do feel different, see if you would want the extra weight of the k10d, because you'll have to carry it around. See what you feel about the difference of size.

The difference between the two camera's is not that anyone will notice in the end-result. 6MB to 10MP, 3200iso to 1600iso. I simply don't know.

If I hadn't had some sponsoring I would have bought the k100d, now I had some money to spend on lenses, camera bag, tripod, remote controler, extra battery, ...

One more thing but this is just a personal opinion, I'm not someone who want's to buy every year or every other year a new cam, so when I do buy I want the best, most complex I can afford. Just a bit a technofreak I think, but in the end it's all about how you feel about the camera and what you want from it.

Ronny

(edit) just forgot - got the tamron 70-300 di-LD and for it's price it's a nice lens
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Old Jan 26, 2007, 8:50 AM   #7
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You can't go wrong either way. I chose the K100D over the K10D simply because I didn't feel the differences in the cameras were worth the extra money (right now around $450). That's a significant jump to me. I had to seriously think about what my needs were and what I would be happy with. The K100D is less complicated but still full-featured. I feel that if I have a camera which I'm comfortable with, I'll producebetter results than if I have a "better" camerawhich I don't understand. Plus I like the fact that the K100D uses standard rechargeable AA batteries.

I'm not knocking the K10D. I'm sure it's an amazing camera. I just feel that it's more camera than I need and certainly not worth an extra $450 (to me). I also don't understandwhat goodweather seals on the bodyare if the lens isn't sealed.
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Old Jan 26, 2007, 8:57 AM   #8
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Excellent, Cheers guys. The running theme is that I'm probably gonna get addicted to buying lenses, filters and will need a good bag to store all of the swag.

lI've only ever had Sony cameras before and I'm currently using a H1 which is starting to reach its limits. The purple fringing is aso annoying me, something which the Pentax dSLR's dont seem to suffer from. Anyhow I would like to progress past using an UltraZoom but would still like the safety net of stability control.

All in all I'm glad that people have spoken so highly about both cameras. I think I'll opt for the K100 for the time being due to the lesser learning curve. It will be a relief to know the lenses are compatible when I upgrade to a K10D. Hopefully I'll be able to ebay the K100 or keep it as a backup.

Again guys, thanks.
Kris.


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Old Jan 26, 2007, 9:11 AM   #9
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I don't think you should buy the K10D for your first DSLR since it takes a great deal more time to learn all the ways to get it to perform to its potential. The K100 will give you great results in a much shorter period of time, so you can work on your photographic skills instead of learning how to work you camera.

As for dust, all DSLR's get dust eventually (just finished getting dust off a D200 sensor), so that isn't even much of a consideration.

Welcome, and have fun!

Tom
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Old Jan 26, 2007, 9:21 AM   #10
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I am a DSLR newbie to be sure but one thing that was very important to me was the speed of the camera in nearly all aspects. It was also important to me that the camera have a high continuous rate of fire for some of the subjects I enjoy. That had me looking at the K10 more than the K100 and seriously considering the Canon 30D. Might not matter to you.The cost of Canon glass with IS put me off. Both the K100 and K10seem to be capable of excellent images in the right hands.
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