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Old Feb 1, 2007, 1:04 PM   #1
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Minoru Yoneto of Queenstown New Zealand has shot some fantastic pics of Comet McNaught, and he uses a Penttax IstDS to shoot them. This page on Spaceweather.com is worth a look, and it's worth looking at the Comet McNaught Photo Gallery to see some of the other pics Yoneto and others have shot.

http://spaceweather.com/
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Old Feb 1, 2007, 1:38 PM   #2
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What a great picture!

Glenn
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Old Feb 1, 2007, 1:41 PM   #3
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WOW!!!!
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Old Feb 1, 2007, 3:09 PM   #4
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That's impressive!


Darren
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Old Feb 1, 2007, 4:28 PM   #5
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Hi everyone - I have been following the comet and pictures of itand I want to give out a link to enjoy. These were not taken with a Pentax (darn), but are so incredible that you will enjoy them anyway. It looks like he merged a number of shots together to get the final images.

These weretaken by Robert McNaught who discovered the comet originally and some pictures are there of the telescope they use down under. Enjoy and don't read what kind of camera was used. Click on new images- Bruce


http://www.mso.anu.edu.au/~rmn/C2006P1.htm
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Old Feb 1, 2007, 4:56 PM   #6
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OK, how come this is the first time I've ever heard of the Southern Lights? I don't think I've ever seen a picture of them, though I've seen hundreds of the Northern Lights. Are they really green and orange like that?
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Old Feb 1, 2007, 8:24 PM   #7
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That same Web site spaceweather.com has more information about both the Northern and Southern Lights. They are basically the same thing, caused by storms of electrically charged particals ejected from the sun, exciting molicules in the atmosphere around the North and South poles. They have those colors too. In November 2004, a solar storm set off an Aurora that I was able to take pictures of here in Southwest Missouri. The Northern Lights are called the Aurora Borealis and the Southern Lights are called Aurora Australis. The auroras are the pretty and photogenic part of a solar storm. It's important to know about them because the same Solar storms that cause auroras can cause serious problems with electronics. In 1989, a big solar storm caused a huge 9-hour power outage and serious damage to the Hydro-Quebec Electric Utility serving 6 million people in Canada and the Northeastern US. We;re in a solar minimum right now, but on the sun's 11-year cycle, Solar activity should be increasing and peak in 2011 and 2012. That was your space plasma physics lesson for the day. Thank you and Good night.
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Old Feb 4, 2007, 3:14 AM   #8
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I sort of prefer the non fisheye ones. And though probably not the kids one seeme composited though likely isn't.

And the last one not even sure why they posted.... nice concept, but focally pretty awful considering some grief I have gotten for slow esposure single element motion blur vs just plain out of focus. I think I would have erred in the side of stars and comet a bit out of focus vs person... or just longer higher F (DOF) shot. I' m sure it was slow sync flash
Or maybe just more distance from person that would have scaled better too. Unfortunately no EXIF info to really judge by what was actually done.

Either way.... 3 or 4 out of seven are quite something!

EDIT....On second look that last shot is even STRANGER (not even real) for being guy OOF.... the guy's hand seems to be casting a shadow on the sky as if it was possed in front of a poster print of the comet.
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Old Feb 4, 2007, 3:30 AM   #9
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Corpsy wrote:
Quote:
OK, how come this is the first time I've ever heard of the Southern Lights? I don't think I've ever seen a picture of them, though I've seen hundreds of the Northern Lights. Are they really green and orange like that?
Northern hemishere centric maybe????

You've likely heard the song but you have never seen the Sothern Cross either.... again south of the equator viewing only.

There are lights over BOTH poles during cosmic partical events.

Where magnetosphere is weakest... or actually drawing them in magnetically... and the particals not repelled as are over the non polar regions, interacting with the atmoshere.
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