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Old Mar 8, 2007, 10:11 PM   #1
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another
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Old Mar 8, 2007, 10:38 PM   #2
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how can I keep from the white looking like it is blown out in this photo?
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Old Mar 8, 2007, 10:39 PM   #3
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last one it was getting cold
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Old Mar 9, 2007, 12:12 AM   #4
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White birds are VERY difficult to photograph. The first one is especially difficult because of where the light was coming from - the bird was back-lit and the camera metered from the darker portions, leaving the white portions blown out. Remember that the camera sensor has less dynamic range than your eye, and sometimes you just can't get both the lights and the darks.

What type of metering were you using? If you were using matrix, the camera will expose for the water, and blow out the bird. Try using spot metering, and then expose for the white on the bird. If that's too dark, then try center weighted, but I have more luck with spot metering. Another thing to do is to turn on the indicator that will flash the blown-out parts when you review your picture. That way you can quickly see if the exposure was wrong and make changes to the EV (-1?) and take another.

It takes lots of practice and experimenting - I still haven't managed a decent picture of an egret yet.
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Old Mar 9, 2007, 6:42 AM   #5
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as H said.
in the playback menu , set the ''bright portion'' to 'on'. this will flash the burnt out hi-lites during playback black. then adjust your EV downwards to compensate. i have a lot of experience shooting white birds and it's really not that hard with some practice.
when using AV mode i've found you need to set the EV compensation to anywhere between -0.3, upto -2 in order to get the white details. this was shot at a -0.7.



this at a -0.3. it depends on the overall EV.



my problem with showing examples is that i shoot a lot in manual and adjust from the first shot i take so no compensation is listed in the exif data. as i said above-- it takes practice--- and a heavy delete finger.
shooting in raw makes all the difference in the world also. expose to theleft of the histogram(to be sure you don't blow the whites)and pull the EV up in PP, post processing.

roy
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Old Mar 9, 2007, 6:46 AM   #6
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oh, a little dodging and burning never hurt anyone either. works really well on white, BUT, the detail has to be there to work with. just ask ansel adams. he was a master at it.

roy
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Old Mar 9, 2007, 12:23 PM   #7
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I think your smart brother also advised using spot metering and adjusting the EV. But what does he know? IEE
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Old Mar 9, 2007, 6:31 PM   #8
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Thank you all for your advise I will get out and try spot metering. Good thing for digital no cost for trial and error.
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Old Mar 9, 2007, 7:48 PM   #9
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spot metering , you will find out is not the only thing you will have to do. you're right about film cost. and no wait too boot..
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Old Mar 9, 2007, 8:44 PM   #10
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Thanks Roy I did read your reply as well and will set the camera as you said and will adjust accordingly. I do appreciate all thehelp and hopefully will get out over the weekend to put it to use. It's supposed to be a heat wave here temps in the 40s or even 50 degrees.

Thanks Jim
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