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Old Mar 16, 2007, 9:37 PM   #1
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The review states:

"Sharpness at the K10D's normal setting was what you would expect of a dSLR, a bit on the soft side so that the image had some range for post processing. But at its maximum in-camera setting, the K10D's images were less sharp than the competition."

According to the K10D manual, p. 120, the default setting ("Natural") when shooting JPEGs is meant to produce "Images [that] are finished naturally and suitable for retouching." It also states that the "Bright"mode is meant to produce "Images [that] are finished brightly, with high contrast and sharpness."

Was that claimed tested? How do JPEGs shot using the Bright mode compare in sharpness to the results from the competition?
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Old Mar 16, 2007, 11:15 PM   #2
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rmarquez wrote:
Quote:
The review states:

"Sharpness at the K10D's normal setting was what you would expect of a dSLR, a bit on the soft side so that the image had some range for post processing. But at its maximum in-camera setting, the K10D's images were less sharp than the competition."

According to the K10D manual, p. 120, the default setting ("Natural") when shooting JPEGs is meant to produce "Images [that] are finished naturally and suitable for retouching." It also states that the "Bright"mode is meant to produce "Images [that] are finished brightly, with high contrast and sharpness."

Was that claimed tested? How do JPEGs shot using the Bright mode compare in sharpness to the results from the competition?
Did you look at our sample images? There are two Bright images there to compare against the Natural version of the same scene.

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2007_...d_samples.html


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Old Mar 17, 2007, 12:19 AM   #3
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Steve:

A couple of points: You got the Auto Range wrong. For K10D, you are free to set any minimum or maximum limit, and in 1, 1/2 or 1/3 stop gradation if you prefer.

Second - why are you using an Ultra II card for the test? You really should use a 20MB/s write speed card such as Extreme III to take full advantage of the burst speed. It's no point using a slower card to test the fastest speed possible.

With Extreme III, you will notice that you can take more than 9-10 shots for PEF, and more than 12 to 13 shots for DNG RAW before it pauses. Yes, despite larger DNG file size, it can speed up the burst speed. The buffers also empty much faster. And you will find that you can take JPG continuously without ever pausing.


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Old Mar 17, 2007, 12:21 AM   #4
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Steve,

It was an extremely fair review and thank you for the time invested in it.

As for image sharpness, the K10D does produce slightly soft images, but the sharpness is there for you to do in PP to your taste, instead of the smooth plastic look some DSLR's produce, which can not be removed in PP.

It is a photographers camera, not a point and shoot camera, but it is a very nice, full featured photographers camera.

Tom
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Old Mar 17, 2007, 12:36 AM   #5
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Thanks, Steve, for posting a complete review of thecamera. I think it's not only detailed, it's fair.

I always use USM on all my pictures (did the same thing with the DS and K100, too) because I prefer to add my own, and this is something that should be pointed out. If I wanted a picture that was processed as super sharp and saturated, I would have bought a different brand. But I had trouble with the FZ30 that way - I thought much of the time my pictures looked over-processed for my tastes, and couldn't figure out how to get them more natural looking.

I'd rather someone buy the K10 for what it is, and what it offers (which is a whole lot, as Steve pointed out). It's not a perfect camera, it's not a beginners camera. Buyers should know that they will be adding their own processing/sharpness to THEIR taste, not to the manufacturer's taste and they are more likely to be happy with the camera. Tell them that their pictures will look just like another brand's pictures (especially if they prefer that look) and they will be disappointed when they find out that to get that look they'll have to spend extra time and effort processing them.
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Old Mar 17, 2007, 8:21 AM   #6
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Nevermind. I found the answer to my question.

http://littlezumbari.blogspot.com/20...harpening.html

And yes, Steve, thanks for the review.
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