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Old Mar 31, 2007, 5:48 AM   #11
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second i did - the histogram was placed almost completely on the left side - using adjust image / adjustments / shadow highlight I could spread that over a larger part of the histogram + a bit of unsharp mask.
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Old Mar 31, 2007, 5:48 AM   #12
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3rd - the white balance is a bit of - you can change this in Raw but here I did some adjustments on the curves, again highlight/shadows and unsharp mask
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Old Mar 31, 2007, 8:02 AM   #13
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The information previously supplied covers most of what can easily be done to 'tart up' an image.

I moved from a prosumer camera (Fuji S602) some 2 years ago to my Pentax *istDS and found it strange that image quality straight out of the camera to be, in some instances, sub standard compared to P&S cameras.

The reason is quite simple. It's not a lame excuse but worth bearing in mind. dSRLs DO NOT do as much 'in camera' processing as P&S cameras. The image is left deliberately soft so that the user can adjust these things to suit their requirements.

You can't undo what's been already done in the camera whereas you can always adjust outside the camera & go back, redo, etc.

The sequence below is something that I do to most of images whichtaken in RAW, then converted in Pentax PhotoLab v2 (sometimes ACR, or SilkyPix Developer):


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Old Mar 31, 2007, 8:19 AM   #14
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thongnd
i have to agree with all said above. the images are not bad. you also have to take in to account that the lens you are using is about the cheapest lens pentax has ever built. the lack of contrast is probably directly attributed to that. can you get your hands on a better lens ?? i think if you do you will be surprised.

roy

edit: the way i see it is that you should not be disappointed with the D but disappointed with the lens.
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Old Mar 31, 2007, 11:02 AM   #15
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also, try using the P, Av, Tv and M modes, instead f the programmes.

A DSLR is not a compact camera. You need to understand and fiddle with the settings a little before your pictures start becoming good.
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Old Mar 31, 2007, 11:32 AM   #16
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It apears we have another Perthite on the forum, welcome aboard.

I agree that the images straight out of the camera to someone that has never used a DLSR before can appear less than perfect. As has been mentioned, lens selection can make a big difference, not just in sharpness but also in contrast.

I have an old manual focus 50mm f/1.7 pentax lens. It provides images that are just so much more cleaner and sharper than my zoom lenses can provide.

If I was back in Perth I would meet up and let you try a few of my lenseson a walkabout in the city centre. You would see for yourself.

Crash
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Old Mar 31, 2007, 12:48 PM   #17
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Hi, Thank you for all of you. Now I feel better, I also try to correct follow with your guides. If you have any comment more, please tell me!!!

Thanks alot!!!

I feel love my camera again, all of evaluation ofmembers in forumsare high confident value!!!

Thongnd

@crashman : please contact me if you come back Perth, I very happy to meet you!!!
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Old Mar 31, 2007, 7:52 PM   #18
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The only thing I might mention in addition to what's already been said - sometimes you'll find situations where your dynamic range and picture gives your camera problems - your brick building is an example. When you come across something like this, take the picture and review it. If it looks like the sky has too much influence on your exposure, choose either spot or center weighted instead of matrix and meter off of the bricks. The building front in the shade still might be too dark, but the rest of the building might be better (but your sky will be lighter). Another option is to play with the EV setting for that picture - just remember to reset it.

The nice thing about digital is that you get immediate feedback and can make changes right then if you don't get what you want.
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Old Apr 1, 2007, 11:45 AM   #19
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@Crashman

While I agree that a prime *should* give you better/sharper etc. images than a zoom lens it isn't very fair to compare these two pictures.

- Lightning condition is completely different, especially from the backlight in shot #2 you can't expect that much

- 1/60s is good for motion blur, 1/125s gives higher chances to "freeze" this

- 28mm (absolute wide end of lens) vs. the 50mm also makes a difference

I think you should give your zoom lenses another chance. Same (and I mean *exactly* the same) conditions, zoom set to 50mm, same f-stop (f/5.6 sounds fine, stopped down for both lenses), same shutter speed on a static subject - and then compare...

I have a Pentax-A 50/1.7 and a Pentax-FA 28-105/4-5.6 zoom lens and I find the zoom lens quite sharp and enjoy using it really much.



@thongnd

I would also agree with the others, especially regarding camera settings, be sure to double-check if something is configured that you were not aware of. Example: check the +/- Av setting (can pre-configure a aperture "shift" in the -2..+2 range) - on my *ist DL2 the ISO automatic doesn't work if this isn't set at "0".

Also that postprocessing is *really* different from what you might be used to from previous digicams and JPEG's.



Regards,

Th.
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Old Apr 1, 2007, 12:11 PM   #20
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Th

I agree the best way to compare would be to shoot identical pictures with the same shutter and aperture. However I just happened to shoot two series of photographs immediately after each other in the same location.

The images from the 50mm prime were so much clearer and sharper as a whole series not just this one. I was actually a little surprised as I know what I paid for each lens.

I mainly shoot with the 28-70mm lens, which is on my camera almost all the time, lately I have had the 10-20mm lens on. Images are not bad, but if I want SHARP then I use my primes.

I want to get an AF version of the 50mm lens just to make focusing easier/faster.

Actually right now I am hankering for a nice 80-20mm f/2.8 If I can find one.

Crash
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