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Old Apr 12, 2007, 10:25 AM   #21
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I think you did a great job! I have struggled with horse jumping for a long time. I have yet to get it right. You're right in that a zoom is essential. Sometimes they are on the near side of the ring and sometimes on the far side.

I still have a problem with timing and getting the horse in a proper tuck. Most of the time I am a smidge too early or late. Combine that with the exposure and WB and panning and freezing problems what I end of with most of the time is a HEADACHE! And don't even start me on the problems of an indoor.

Great shots from my eyes.

Robin
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Old Apr 12, 2007, 1:26 PM   #22
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Harriet, Nice captures and if you had fun taking them then it was a successful day! Jim
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Old Apr 12, 2007, 3:42 PM   #23
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[email protected] wrote:
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I still have a problem with timing and getting the horse in a proper tuck. Most of the time I am a smidge too early or late. Combine that with the exposure and WB and panning and freezing problems what I end of with most of the time is a HEADACHE! And don't even start me on the problems of an indoor.
Hi Robin,

I wouldn't knock yourself too hard about the timing thing -- I once read an article about the Sports Illustrated photogs. When they switched to DSLRs, it took most of them about 6 months to get used to the minute shutter lag of the digital bodies compared to their old film bodies. Training your body and brain to anticipate the right moment is very difficult.

Scott


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Old Apr 12, 2007, 5:04 PM   #24
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Thanks, Scott, for the encouragement.

I maybe unskilled but I am determined.

If I could acheive results like mtngal I'd be quite happy. My favorite photo is actually the one of the out of focus pony taking the in focus jump. It almost has a "phantom-like" aura about.
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Old Apr 12, 2007, 11:07 PM   #25
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Robin -

Actually, that pony is in focus - what you see is motion blur (believe me he was really flying by that point - it was a jumper class). You need a much faster shutter speed to stop motion than what I was able to get with the DA 50-200 lens. It did fine outside (the first picture) but if I were going to be doing this much inside, I'd want something much faster.

I found that my timing wasn't that good - I often was a hair late or way too early (the first indoor picture where I showed the un-retouched picture is an example). I was actually surprised that I did as well as I did - it's been probably 15 years since I've ridden over fences, and longer since I was at a horse show. It was probably trying to shoot hurdlers that helped - I only had one headless horseman from the show.

Biggest thing is to practice, practice, practice. Go out when someone's practicing and work onyourtiming and framing (something I had major problems with when I was shooting the hurdlers). Start off outside in good light, put the camera on "P" or Tv and set a fast shutter speed, then start shooting away. The neat thing about digital is that there's always the delete key, and you'll see what you are doing right or wrong right away, and you can make adjustments on the spot. Or do what I did - wander into a show that you don't know anyone riding in and start snapping. Relax and have fun with it, I find I do better if I wait for the action to come to where I'm focused (prefocus on the fence and snap when the horse comes to it) rather than following the horse (but then, recently I've been shooting track with a manual lens and if you don't do that you'll never get anything in focus). I should have thought about counting strides early on, had forgotten how that helps with one's timing when you are riding over fences, so it should work when you are shooting, too.

Take my comments for what they are - the musings/experience of someone who's main photographic experience at horse shows is a couple of hours last weekend playing around with it. I'd want tohave lots more practicebefore I would feel comfortable or able to get a really good shot.
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