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Old Apr 29, 2007, 6:50 PM   #11
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Corpsy wrote:
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oreo57 wrote:
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Accurate AWB would be fine. Just doen't look to be as easy as you believe. To make a long story short, how do you distiguish between a late morning sunrise and indoor tungsten? these would need 2 different sets of coefficients to make the conversion accurate to the intent. Not that it couldn't be done but it just gets a bit more complicated. Since apparently many DSLR's do not have accurate WB in indoor ambient light, what does that suggest to you? This is not a Pentax issue per say.
As to any implied superiority over DSLR's and P&S, most P&S's meter off the taking sensor, giving them an extreme advantage in area and resolution. DSLR's have much smaller metering chips w/ low resolution (low pixel count relative to the sensor).
Unfortunately using the sensor has it's drawbacks in speed and shutter lag, which of course gets improved on as we speak
If you buy a K10 and set the WB at 5000K (shooting RAW of course), you get a better representation of the actual range on the histogram re: blowouts

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1036&message=22957362
AWB and light metering have nothing to do with each other. Light metering determines what the camera estimates to be a proper exposure, and white balance is applied to the RAW data after the image is capture. No matter what white balance setting you use, the exact same RAW data is collected.

I don't know how the AWB works exactly in different circumstances, only that as long as it is within it's set temperature range it tends to do a decent job. I imagine it's very close to how I manually white balance a photo in Photoshop, by balancing the 3 color channels throughout the luminosity range.
I plead partial stupidity here, yes they could estimate WB from the raw data and use it upon converting to jpg. Would have nothing to do w/ the light meter per se..
Not admitting to complete stupidity yet (pretty close) but the calculations and methods of determining wB are the same.... The lightmeter may be monochromatic, which would make it worthless for WB, don't know that for sure though, as you may gather

http://www.photoweb.net/pw_tech/floures1.html

http://www.nikondigital.org/articles...mera_color.htm


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Old Apr 30, 2007, 11:05 PM   #12
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Corpsy wrote:
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So far, nobody has explained why accurate auto white balance would not be a benefit, but some of you seem to be arguing that AWB shouldn't even be an available feature. Personally, I shoot AWB all the time since I shoot RAW anyway and can fix anything that doesn't come out right later on.
Even without RAW I tend to shoot mostly AWB unless it it is weird/dim enough light it is clearly not working... and again have edited most of my K10D presets for those situations (one of few if any other cameras to even allow you to do that) as well as the 4 custom ones (1 man and 3 color temp) for the really weird ones like pink street lights and the often club pink stage lighting.

And I seem an oddity that I do not expected indoor incandescent light to look like daylight.... while I do not expect ORANGE... I do expect it to be a bit warm... because if you are honest with your brain, that is how your eyes are actually seeing it too... its NOT daylight, and I prefer reality to artificial.
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Old May 1, 2007, 4:45 AM   #13
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Gazander wrote:
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AWB range starts at 4000 K
The Tungsten WB setting is ~2850 K

So you will NEVER get proper white balance on auto indoors.
Yes you would likely in a bright or theater level lighting.

But yes yes it tends to be a little to warm for typical dim home/non theater other bright type lighting. (Which is not at all surprising for a semi pro vs a consumer camera like the FZ-30, that can actually look too cool under "true" tungsten lighting)

On my K10D I have have both cooled my tungsten preset (though I'd have to renormal it in a theater setting likely) and also warmed my flash preset which even as fill in late day seems much too blue often, and indoors often unaturally blue (and that is true of any digital camera I have ever had). At least the K10D gives you that flexability, to alter things to conditions/taste... and quickly visually... not just hit and miss guessing.

The biggest limitation to AWB is there just not being enough white in the image.... if there isn't then it has to do its guess work on general dominant colors. The only proper way to do an auto white balance is to do it off a white card, zoomed on a white subject, or a WB lens cap and then lock it.

Unfortunately most still cameras don't do this easily/quickly and is usually called manual WB, though the measured WB is set automatically (but on K10D like all the others is still fine tunable as well), but is a standard one button feature of many semi and most pro video cameras.
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