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Old May 12, 2007, 11:31 PM   #1
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I am contemplating buying the K100d, but I am somewhat concerned about the small buffer issue. Being a newbie, I am not even sure it applies to me; hence the post.

I will use the camera primarily to shoot nature and the antics of my two year old daughter. I think my need for continuous shooting might be somewhat limited. My question is, given the small buffer, how quickly can I shoot in single-shot mode? Should I even be concerned about the buffer?

Thanks for your help. NP.
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Old May 13, 2007, 12:28 AM   #2
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Just my experience (I do mostly flowers and landscapes with some sports and architecture for variety) I don't have a problem with the buffer on the K100 shooting single shot. It takes me more time to glance down to review the picture, decide what I want to take next, line it up, focus and shoot than it does for the buffer to clear on single shot. Even when I'm not reviewing the photo, just changing something, like focal length or aperture orfocus it still takes me longer than the camera takes towrite the picture to the card. And I almost always shoot raw.
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Old May 13, 2007, 1:00 AM   #3
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With JPG likely never an issue, you MIGHT shooting RAW in very quick shooting, but again likely not if you do any review, reaiming, focusing, framing, etc between shots.
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Old May 13, 2007, 8:27 AM   #4
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I have the K100d and I have filled the buffer shooting jpeg in single shot mode but I was pushing the shutter button about as fast as it fires in burst mode. As the others have said, this should not be an issue under normal circumstances.

Tim
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Old May 14, 2007, 2:30 AM   #5
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I have the K100D and there are only a few times where I have run into having the buffer full. That is when I am taking shots in very quick succession, usually when I am doing a landscape using HDR, or high dynamic range. This may interest you. HDR is when you essentially take multiple images which are combined into a single one. For instance the K100D is setup to do this, where you can take 3 images in quick succession, one regular, one +1 full f stop and one -1 f stop (the K100D in this mode will automatically adjust the fstop from one shot to the next when set in this mode). Then post processing these three are combined together to form a single image taking the highlights of each (simple explaination) and folding them into a single result.

This web page has an illulstration that probably provides the best explaination and illulstration of the technique and its result http://www.hdrsoft.com/

Anyway, when taking these you usually snap off 3 frames pretty quickly and thus have about 15 seconds for the entire set to write to the memory card.

Its not a big deal, the only problem I had was when I was trying to take a HDR panaroma, thus each panel required 3 images, and I was trying to hold everything steady keeping an even horizon while the sets were writing out so I would have buffer room for the next panel of the panaorama.

Shooting in single shot mode - you will never notice that the buffer is limited to 3 images.

Otherwise, you reall do not have anything to worry about.


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Old May 15, 2007, 3:53 AM   #6
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This is really called auto bracketing all SLR's (and many high end P&S) offer and it doesn't have to be full stop steps.... also usually half and sometimes 1/3.... what you do with it after is another matter.

A cool thing the K10D (100 doesn't) also allows is to do the same with steps of WB, saturation, sharpness, or contrast as well.... and if one of those combined with bracketing, you are talking 9 recorded (3 actual) shots for every shot... and why its buffer needs to be so robust to pull that off and would bog down in continuous burst before too long, but in burst without that you can pretty, just hold the shutter until you run out of memory.

But again just rapid (not burst) single shot JPG on the 100D should not be a real problem, except in exceptionally rapid cases.
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Old May 15, 2007, 6:33 AM   #7
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interested_observer wrote:
Quote:
I have the K100D and there are only a few times where I have run into having the buffer full. That is when I am taking shots in very quick succession, usually when I am doing a landscape using HDR, or high dynamic range. This may interest you. HDR is when you essentially take multiple images which are combined into a single one. For instance the K100D is setup to do this, where you can take 3 images in quick succession, one regular, one +1 full f stop and one -1 f stop (the K100D in this mode will automatically adjust the fstop from one shot to the next when set in this mode). Then post processing these three are combined together to form a single image taking the highlights of each (simple explaination) and folding them into a single result.
IO,

you really don't want to change your f-stop when shooting for HDR. it changes the DOF of the image. you'll get better results if you change the speed instead.
also, use a manual WB so the cam uses it thru out the shoot.
roy
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Old May 15, 2007, 8:38 AM   #8
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robar wrote:
Quote:
you really don't want to change your f-stop when shooting for HDR. it changes the DOF of the image. you'll get better results if you change the speed instead.
also, use a manual WB so the cam uses it thru out the shoot.
roy
Either way you are recording 3 shots for every one taken.... 10D can hadle that with ease JPG... that will catch up to you on a 100D especially in burst....

But again going back to OP ? maybe?

Shouldn't be an issue you one shot clicking away on the 100D.... taking brief time outs and other than just holding the shutter button down.
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Old May 24, 2007, 6:44 PM   #9
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Thank you all for your advice. I took the plunge and purchased a K100D kit and 50-200mm lens from Beach. Got them a few days ago and I am hooked!

Seriously, this thing, even in my amateur hands, takes some really good pictures (WAF is high too). I can't wait to play with it this weekend and get to know what it can really do. Will post some pics once I get the hang of it.

Cheers,
NP
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Old May 24, 2007, 7:10 PM   #10
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Glad you are happy with your new purchase - definitely post some pictures! If you have any question, don't hesitate to ask - there's lots of folks around here who are knowledgable and happy to answer whatever you might ask.
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