Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Pentax / Samsung dSLR, K Mount Mirrorless

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old May 19, 2007, 1:21 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
bilybianca's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Hassleholm, Sweden
Posts: 3,435
Default

Gazander wrote:
Quote:
The gentleman in the picture is actually... me!
For those curious, in the tankard is Unibroue's "Fin Du Monde" (translates to "End of the World")
So I'll just wait for the invitation, then:homey:

Kjell
bilybianca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 19, 2007, 3:46 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
tjsnaps's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Sacramento, Ca
Posts: 652
Default

Catbells wrote:
Quote:
tjsnaps wrote:
Quote:
Tim

I'm going to guess and say it took me somewhere between ten and fifteen minutes. But I have been doing it for a while.
Didn't realise that it was a competition!

I'm appreciative of the techniques used - not necessarily in the final result as the quality of the source material must be a limiting factor.
No compatition. I was just answering tim's question. He seems to be concerned with how long these things take. Like anything else the more you do it the more effeciant you become at it.
tjsnaps is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 20, 2007, 9:10 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
NonEntity1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Lake Placid Florida USA
Posts: 2,689
Default

tjsnaps wrote:
Quote:
Catbells wrote:
Quote:
tjsnaps wrote:
Quote:
Tim

I'm going to guess and say it took me somewhere between ten and fifteen minutes. But I have been doing it for a while.
Didn't realise that it was a competition!

I'm appreciative of the techniques used - not necessarily in the final result as the quality of the source material must be a limiting factor.
No compatition. I was just answering tim's question. He seems to be concerned with how long these things take. Like anything else the more you do it the more effeciant you become at it.
Yes, and thank you for that answer. I know some people like the PPing part of this hobby, to me it is a chore. But if I felt that I could do a good job faster I might be more willing to learn. The only time I tried to B&W everything in a picture except my subject it probably took me 90 minutes to two hours. I really liked the end result but it took so long I have never attempted it again.

I really enjoyed this thread and seeing what different people's take on Gaz's photo were as well as the different PPing efforts. Thanks for posting it Gazander.

Tim
NonEntity1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 21, 2007, 8:32 AM   #24
Senior Member
 
IntrepidWalker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 177
Default

Gazander wrote:
Quote:
Hi guys, sorry it took so long to respond to my own thread.

That's some very impressive cloning, though I'm not sure I'd want to completely obliterate the background. I like to keep the image close to the original scene. I think with some selective manipuation, I could probably get the highlight portion to be slightly less noticeable, but like I said I need to play with it some more.

Once again I really appreciate everyone taking the time to comment.
This one took a little under 8 minutes and is probably closer to what Gazanderwould prefer
Attached Images
 
IntrepidWalker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 21, 2007, 9:43 AM   #25
Senior Member
 
bilybianca's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Hassleholm, Sweden
Posts: 3,435
Default

This is how I would have done it - if I had done it...

Kjell
bilybianca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 21, 2007, 10:31 AM   #26
Senior Member
 
ennacac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 4,198
Default

IMHO PP is fun (sometimes) but looking at the composition including the background when you take the photo is really the way to go instead of relying on the digital darkroom to fix a problem you should not have had in the first place.

The final product posted could have been done in camera had the background been taken into consideration at the time of the shot along with DOF. Composition is a big part of photography, it is not just aiming the camera and pushing the button.

As I use to tell my students "Look into the viewfinder, not through it"

I see many of my pro friends that shoot weddings for a living, now taking thousands of shots in digital instead of the 300-400 they took in film days. They then spend countless hours going through all those images and then fixing them on the computer just because they don't take the time to compose now that they did back when they were shooting film.

Personally I feel they produced a better product using film than the do now with digital even though they still get $5,000-$7,000 per wedding.

Tom
ennacac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 21, 2007, 11:30 AM   #27
Senior Member
 
tjsnaps's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Sacramento, Ca
Posts: 652
Default

ennacac wrote:
Quote:
IMHO PP is fun (sometimes) but looking at the composition including the background when you take the photo is really the way to go instead of relying on the digital darkroom to fix a problem you should not have had in the first place.

The final product posted could have been done in camera had the background been taken into consideration at the time of the shot along with DOF. Composition is a big part of photography, it is not just aiming the camera and pushing the button.

As I use to tell my students "Look into the viewfinder, not through it"

I see many of my pro friends that shoot weddings for a living, now taking thousands of shots in digital instead of the 300-400 they took in film days. They then spend countless hours going through all those images and then fixing them on the computer just because they don't take the time to compose now that they did back when they were shooting film.

Personally I feel they produced a better product using film than the do now with digital even though they still get $5,000-$7,000 per wedding.

Tom
I would agree that you should always capture the best image you can in camera. However it can also be said that darkroom and retouching skills have always been an important part of photography. And Photoshop (or other programs) can allow creativity well beyond basic post processing. Yes.. if you rely on photoshop to get good results then its time to go back to basics. But IMO to NOT learn good PPing would be to short change yourself in your craft.
tjsnaps is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 6:17 AM.